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9

According to Genesis, Noah's ark was box shaped. At 300 cubits long (450 feet), 50 cubits wide (75 feet), and 30 cubits high (45 feet), the shape is not round. Genesis 6:15-16 And this is the fashion which thou shalt make it of: The length of the ark shall be three hundred cubits, the breadth of it fifty cubits, and the height of it thirty cubits. A ...


7

Good question. While no state of maturity for Adam and Eve at creation is ever explicitly stated in the Bible, there are some texts where we can infer something about their state. Adam is created to work the garden and care for it (Genesis 2:15). He then names the animals (Genesis 2:19, 20). This is not something that an infant could do. Adam and Eve are ...


6

My question is: Is there a place in Scripture from which we can draw a dogmatic conclusion as to whether Adam was created as a fully developed man, or as a new born babe? Based on the nature of the literary genre of Genesis, and comparisons of Gen.1-3 with other origin stories of ancient near eastern literature I would say the answer to your ...


6

Since our goal is to understand what the author of the text meant by what he wrote, it is more helpful to look at how the event is described by the author, in the text than to get hung up on semantic possibilities, ANE discoveries, or personal beliefs. The author clearly meant it to be understood as a global event. In addition to the evidence you already ...


5

Assuming a literal reading of the text (which is how the hermeneutic I hold takes Genesis), then in one 24 hour period, the 6th day of creation, Adam (and by extension on some of the points, Eve) was:1 Made fully capable of understanding language, as God spoke to them (Gen 1:28; cf. Gen 2:15-17) Made fully capable of sexual reproduction to multiply on the ...


4

Some argue that Job 40:15:24 mentions Behemoth and Leviathan and that these are dinosaurs, however radiometric dating indicates that most or all dinosaurs died out millions of years before Job. On the other hand, Technically Crocodiles are Dinosaurs so the answer is "all of them." It is also possible that the Leviathan is a Plesiosaur and this dinosaur ...


4

There are some helpful reflections in the existing answers, although one flaw affects them all, and it is embedded in the question, as posed, itself... The Meaning of ṢDQ? The flaw is the assumption that Hebrew verb (in Gen 38:26) ṣādaq should be understood here as "righteous", where "righteous" stands for some kind of ethical purity next to holiness ...


3

While the preceding verse (5) makes reference to Genesis 1:2, verse 6 itself is referring to the flood of Noah's time, note the connecting word 'later' in the CEV (a version produced by the American Bible society): 5 They will say this because they want to forget that long ago the heavens and the earth were made at God’s command. The earth came out of ...


3

Two very easy questions. Question one: the answer is Hebrew. Question 2: the word used in Gen. 1:26 is אָדָם (ʼādām, “man”); the word in 1:27 is הָאָדָם (hāʼādām “the man”).


3

You focus on Tamar. But first I would encourage you to focus on Judah. Judah was familiar with the law (as were all players in this family drama.) Yet his two eldest sons were so badly behaved that God struck them down. What does that say about the kind of father (and man) Judah was, that he should have two sons who so displeased the Lord? And why, then, ...


3

This theory is pretty credible. There a great deal of scholars which entertain this idea who are collectively known as Panbabylonists. This seems to raise the ire of many purists who would like to believe that Genesis was influenced by God alone. In my opinion, however many fail to consider the idea that perhaps sections of Genesis were not derived from ...


3

The view one takes on the credibility of the assertion is going to depend largely on one's presuppositions and level of allowance for the Bible text to speak for itself. If the Torah (Law, i.e. "teaching" is the idea in Hebrew, not just the actual commands and prohibitions), which includes Genesis, was formed contra what critical scholars claim, and instead ...


3

With any theory like this its just as credible that the influence goes the other way. The argument that the Sumerians could not influence the Hebrews directly is bunk, in that perhaps they could not directly influence the author of Genesis, but since they would have been contemporary with Abraham they could have influenced the stream of Hebrew thought at an ...


2

Short Answer: Based on the textual evidence, it may not be a third usage, but in fact the same as the second usage. In other words, the land (as opposed to the waters or heavens) was formless and void. There are two key pieces of evidence from the text that support this conclusion: Gen. 1:2 does not merely say the earth was formless and void, but also ...


2

As modern day Westerners, we forget that middle-easterners from 2 to 5 thousand years ago had a very different picture of the universe. Reading the Enûma Eliš and Eridu Genesis are very revealing in this regard. Here is a pictographic representation of what these people from long ago would have envisioned the universe: When reading Genesis one, is is most ...


2

Because in English, it is considered poor grammar not to have subject-verb agreement. From the text of the Pentateuch and Torah as a whole, it is clear that all occurrences of Elohim (plural) and Yahweh (singular) are discussing the same deity. In verses like Deuteronomy 6:4, Literally, this would translate as "Hear and Obey O Israel, the LORD your Gods ...


2

"Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished:" (2 Peter 3:6 KJV) The key word here is "perished". No one died from a flood before Noah's day. The scripture at Gen. 1:1 describes the earth as being "empty" so there were no people to destroy with floodwater. Also if we look at the context of Peter's word in this verse, we can ...


2

Tamar was more righteous because she saw the whole situation and Judah did not. She was “at the end of her rope,” in the society in which she lived. She had complied with Judah’s wishes as far as she could; she married two of his sons (Er and Onan), but she was at the point where she didn’t have any options left. It seems clear that Judah wasn’t going to ...


2

God tells humanity to "rule over" (LXX-κατακυριεύσατε) the earth in Genesis 1:28. This cannot be taken as divine permission to trash the planet. In the ancient world, image bearers of potentates acted as royal regents. God created humans, both male and female, as his image bearers to act as his regents. Stewardship of the created world seems to be part ...


2

The Idea in Brief The “serpent” was a quadruped that became an unclean creature. This creature was to creep on the ground and thrive on “dust,” which connotes what is unclean (to include death). The general imagery in Genesis therefore was that the “serpent” became unclean, and had become a threat to man, whose heel the “serpent” could bite and precipitate ...


2

As far as I know, the only other place in the Old Testament where this same Hebrew term ("desire for you") is used, is in the next chapter, when God speaks to Cain. "If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is for you, but you must rule over it.” (Genesis 4:7, ESV) In the literary ...


2

Abraham, at Gen. 22: 16-17 is promised that his descendants would be blessed with an "exceeding multiplication of his seed like the stars of the heaven and the sand upon the seashore." Previously, at Gen. 13:16, God promised Abraham that his posterity would be as numerous "as the dust of the earth." Rabbi Mendel Weinbach writes about this: "Sand, dust ...


1

This is clear use of hyperbole. Jesus makes use of similar hyperbole in the sermon on the mount (Matthew 5:21-48) in which he instructs us to cut out our eyes if we even look lustfully at a woman or cut off our hand if we stumble. He doesn't mean this literally, but is using hyperbole to emphasize his point. Likewise, here we have an over-emphasis to drive ...


1

A question about how old or recent an interpretation is goes beyond basic hermeneutics into textual studies of the hermeneutics of the ancient and medieval church. I can't go in depth, but I can give a brief overview. Respected scholar Richard Bauckham notes in his book, God and the Crisis of Freedom, "Neither the theological nor the exegetical tradition ...


1

The genealogies of the New Testament should be read not for length of peoples' ages - these may very well be inaccurate - but instead for the honor claim that they make. This is also part of a literary device used to divide the structure of Genesis called the toldot formula into 7 parts. Radiometric dating indicates that modern mankind has lived for many ...


1

You must keep in mind that these societies predate any concept of "inalienable rights" or "personal integrity". Whether someone is righteous or not is up to the perception of their peers and chain of patrons (possibly all the way up to God). The god, patron, or public determine on a very subjective case-by-case basis what is right or wrong. Judah was not ...


1

The first part of the term "Bene Ha'elohim" simply means sons of. Therefore, the question really revolves around what "elohim" refers to here. There are a couple of things that elohim can refer to. In the Bible, it is typically used to refer to Yahewh (god,) however elohim can also refer to gods; the mighty, great or powerful (so, lords or aristocracy); or ...


1

Pauls conversion revelation & vision of the risen Christ 14 And when we were all fallen to the earth, I heard a voice speaking unto me, and saying in the Hebrew tongue, Saul, Saul, why persecutest thou me? it is hard for thee to kick against the pricks. Some have inferred from this that Hebrew might be the native language of Heaven. Acts 26:13 At ...


1

I think it is clear that the final redactor(s) thought of Elohim as one, and therefore as the sole-one who created mankind (human beings). The phrase 'Let us make...' is a borrowed-motif from other Ancient Near East cultures, and alludes to the concept of a Divine Council (Assembly) - something that the final redactor(s) believed based on the following ...



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