Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

8

The idea of a "son" in first century Christian writings was different than it is today. The term "son" simply signified that he came from God and bore His image. (examples) Both of these things are true of Adam: Then God said, “Let Us make man in Our image, according to Our likeness . . . " God created man in His own image, in the image of God He ...


5

While Luke indeed points out in his Gospel that Joseph was of the house of David,1 it is curious why this was of importance to the narrative, since Jesus was conceived without the seed of Joseph. This led many early Christian Church Fathers and scholars to propose that Mary is also of the house and lineage of David.2 From here several hypotheses emerged to ...


4

Most commentators circle around the ideas that these are either Jewish genealogies or a unknown Gnostic type of genealogies that include angels. However there seems to be strong support that it was a particularly Jewish disturbance being spoken of in Timothy and Titus, as compared to say Colossians which may have been related to a mystic type of Jewish ...


4

Judah was the father of Peretz, but Tamar was known as the "mother of Peretz and Zerah" and the emphasis is on the maternal side in this verse, as in verses 5 and 7 referring respectively to the sons of the matriarchs Rahav, Ruth and Bat-Sheva. See also the wording of the genealogy in Chronicles I 2:4 where the twins are mentioned as the sons of Tamar. See ...


4

From a Christian Perspective, there is a lineage from Adam to Yeshua (Jesus) in which we find righteous men who sought after and followed God; this forms a red line of redemption from Adam (and Eve) whose seed God promised would crush the serpents head, to Jesus who it is believed will fulfill that prophecy. Generally, the way the book of Genesis is ...


3

The problem occurs in v. 10 as well, where variant readings between "Amos" and "Amon" occur. That is, like "Asaph" and "Asa," the words are near homonyms with the respective psalmist Asaph and prophet Amos. In this regard, the late Bruce Metzger (1994) comments as follows on these verses: 1:7–8 Ἀσάφ, Ἀσάφ {B} It is clear that the name ...


2

Just to add. Greek does not use the word "son". Whole geneolgy goes just with genitives. "Josef of Heli, of Mathat ... etc. until of Adam, of God." In greek tou + genitive means usually "belonging to". The only time the word "son" is used here is in v. 22 where Jesus is "supposedly son of Joseph" and in v. 21 where God says to Jesus "you are my beloved son". ...


2

In my research on the use of numerology in Genesis, I found: Shem is given as living 600 years Arphaxad lived 438 years - 35 years before the birth of Salah (11:12) and 403 after (11:13) Salah lived 433 years - 30 years before the birth of Eber and 403 years after (11:14-15). Eber lived 464 years - 34 years before the birth of Peleg and 430 years after ...


1

Luke is drawing a comparison between Adam the son of God and Jesus the son of God. He ends the genealogy with Adam as son of God and moves directly into describing the temptation of Jesus in the wilderness. The point Luke is emphasizing is the difference between the actions of Jesus and Adam when they were tempted. Though the first Adam failed to obey God in ...


1

Ussher provides answer half of your question in his work, Annuls of the World: Jacob was ninety-one years old when Joseph was born, and consequently, seventy-seven years old when he first began to serve Laban. This may be deduced, for Jacob was a hundred and thirty years old when he first stood before Pharaoh at the time when the seven years of ...


1

Leon R. Kass, author of The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis says that the line of ten generations from Adam to Noah begs to be compared to the seven generations from Cain to the sons of Lamech. Genesis chapter 4 Adam Cain Enoch Irad Mehujael Methusael Lamech Genesis chapter 5 Adam Seth Enos Cainan (Cain) Mahalaleel (Mehujael) Jared (Irad) Enoch ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible