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Contextual and Historical Analysis Two other uses The word עִצָּבוֹן (ʿiṣṣāḇôn) itself is only found 3 times in the Hebrew Scripture, all in Genesis. Here in 3:16, then in 3:17, and finally Gen 5:29.1 The use in Gen 5:29 is actually a clarifying commentary on 3:17. The NKJV (used for all English translations herein) translates 3:17 and 5:29 as: 3:17 ...


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Carol Meyer's translation is spot on. It is my attempt to refute the notion that Eve and all later mother's birth pangs were multiplied, but it was actually the woman's conceptions and attempts (or efforts) to conceive the promised seed, that were increased. Let me explain. After a causal reading of Gen 3 one may conclude that once Adam and Eve sinned, God ...


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Families in those days tended to be much larger, especially in regards to kings. David had many wives, each probably bearing multiple children. It would not be difficult in such a situation to see two important details: Due to having many children, David would not have been as intimate with all of his children. It's simply a matter of running a kingdom, ...


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Jewish law interprets this as an enjoineder against using undue force in a confrontation. If the action were justified, there'd be no punishment. In addition, the Talmud considers 'cutting off the hand' as indicating the payment of a fine--one's hand seen as figuratively as the recipient of (financial) gain. In Jewish penal law there may be a death ...


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I'd always taken your first two examples to be showing the hot-headedness of young men. By the time someone is a father of a woman of marriable age one is likely to have calmed down somewhat and be more mature, not risking civil war or clan war to revenge one person. Having lived within a tribal culture in Africa for a few years, it was my experience that ...


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The issue described is not a joke. I believe when properly understood, this passage should be seen as one of the most significant in the Old Testament. There is no written record of what is described ever being done. That is one of the reasons it is difficult to determine the meaning. Lacking a real event to demonstrate how this should be applied, we are ...


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There are two types of sorrow or pain the LORD spoke of: To the woman he said, “I will greatly increase your עִצְּבוֹנֵ֣ךְ pangs in childbearing; in בְּעֶ֖צֶב pain you shall bring forth children, yet your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you.” (Genesis 3:16 NRSV) The difference between the two may be seen in how the two words ...


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They are all male names. You can check this through the use of Biblical encyclopedias and dictionaries that will list the uses of the name elsewhere in the Bible. A combination of Easton's Bible Dictionary and the ISBE would suffice. Examples of preliminary results for the first four names are as follows: Mattithaia, male: (1 Chronicles 25:3, 21) Shema, ...



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