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Contextual and Historical Analysis Two other uses The word עִצָּבוֹן (ʿiṣṣāḇôn) itself is only found 3 times in the Hebrew Scripture, all in Genesis. Here in 3:16, then in 3:17, and finally Gen 5:29.1 The use in Gen 5:29 is actually a clarifying commentary on 3:17. The NKJV (used for all English translations herein) translates 3:17 and 5:29 as: 3:17 ...


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Carol Meyer's translation is spot on. It is my attempt to refute the notion that Eve and all later mother's birth pangs were multiplied, but it was actually the woman's conceptions and attempts (or efforts) to conceive the promised seed, that were increased. Let me explain. After a causal reading of Gen 3 one may conclude that once Adam and Eve sinned, God ...


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In The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis, Leon R. Kass looks at whether there really are two different accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2. On pages 55-57, Kass discusses the main differences between chapter 1 and chapter 2, and concludes the second story is not just a magnified version of the human portions of the first. He says it is utterly distinct ...


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It's been noted in the past that animal names and varieties of plants are the most difficult to translate, and so we will be fortunate if we can determine a conclusive answer to these sorts of questions. I was originally thrown in understanding this question due to the KJV's rendering of 'asses', which I automatically assumed were cross-bred animals - but ...


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There are two types of sorrow or pain the LORD spoke of: To the woman he said, “I will greatly increase your עִצְּבוֹנֵ֣ךְ pangs in childbearing; in בְּעֶ֖צֶב pain you shall bring forth children, yet your desire shall be for your husband, and he shall rule over you.” (Genesis 3:16 NRSV) The difference between the two may be seen in how the two words ...


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Jewish law interprets this as an enjoineder against using undue force in a confrontation. If the action were justified, there'd be no punishment. In addition, the Talmud considers 'cutting off the hand' as indicating the payment of a fine--one's hand seen as figuratively as the recipient of (financial) gain. In Jewish penal law there may be a death ...


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Some scholars, such at Dominick Crossan and Marcus Borg suggest that 1 Cor. 14:33-36 is a later insertion, for if you remove this passage, the subject of prophecy in 14:26-33 picks up naturally at 14:37-40. Furthermore, the insertion is given as a separate paragraph in all Greek manuscripts. The silencing of women in church contradicts the general attitude ...



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