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The very first miracle Jesus performed was a living illustration of his mission to cleanse. What did Jesus mean that his hour had not yet come? His hour to perform miracles? His mother surely was not asking him to perform a miracle, for he had never even done any miracles. Besides that, he immediately performed the miracle, something he would not have ...


4

John’s extensive marriage theme begins with none other than the wedding of Cana and Jesus’ encounter with His own mother, the first woman to appear in the gospel. When the "mother of Jesus" approaches him about the wedding’s lack of wine, she assumes and expects her son to assume a role that in Jewish custom is specifically reserved for the groom and or ...


4

Short Answer: The "hour" that Jesus is referring to here is the hour of His work on the cross. "The reason Jesus gives for the distance he maintains between his mother and himself must be viewed in the light of the cross. . . . the word 'time', literally 'hour' (hora), constantly refers to his death on the cross and the exaltation bound up with it (7:30; ...


4

Under torah a woman does not have standing to bring a legal claim against her husband, nor can she initiate a divorce. It seems to follow, then, that she could not initiate the sotah ritual against a straying husband. (Note that if there has been adultery, then this means the other man's wife, if he is married, has no recourse against him.) According to ...


4

In part, Matthew is laying the groundwork for the naming of Jesus, so named because "He will save His people from their sins" (Mt 1:21). In various ways, these women reveal the mess of the Messiah's own family tree. Matthew is not of course implying that the women are the primary sinners in the stories they evoke. But the mention of David without Bathsheba ...


4

An alternate translation is “assembling” rather than “ministering”; the relevant root is צבא, see, e.g., Wiktionary. Try this translation on for size: He made the washstand of copper and its base of copper; from the mirrors of the assembled [women], who congregated at the entrance of the tent of meeting. The translation of “ministering” is somewhat ...


3

My understanding is that Jesus was really challenging the view of woman in the current society even having a serious conversation with a woman. And he, as you note, did have woman disciples: Some time afterward he went on through towns and villages, preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The twelve were with him, and also some ...


3

The passage here includes the phrase: לֹא תָחוֹס עֵינֶךָ You shall not have pity. This same text also appears in Deut 19:21: וְלֹא תָחוֹס, עֵינֶךָ: נֶפֶשׁ בְּנֶפֶשׁ, עַיִן בְּעַיִן שֵׁן בְּשֵׁן, יָד בְּיָד, רֶגֶל בְּרָגֶל. And thine eye shall not pity: life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot. We ...


2

Each of these women recognized the expectation of the "Promised Seed" by faith in God's covenant with Abraham and David, respectively. For an amplified discussion of Tamar, Rahab, and Ruth, and their respective goal of the pursuit-and-capture of the "Promised Seed" by faith, please click here. (Please note however that Bathsheba is not mentioned by name in ...


2

Abstract This may also have something to do with 'leaving mother (and father)" and clinging to the wife "church", as talked about in Genesis 2. The Wedding at Cana in Galilee is the first and opening miracle in John’s Gospel. When the wine runs out and Mother Mary says: “They have no wine” Jesus says: “Woman, what does that have to do with ...


2

When Paul (1Cor 14:33) was refering to the Law he may have used the term in its wider sense as the whole Torah including the 1st Book of Moses where it is stated that (as a consequence of the transgression in Eden) the man would from then on rule over the woman. (Without conflict there would have been no such order.) The Law itself expands on the matter of ...


2

The text does not say what the women did when they were ministering. Possibly they were greeting people as they entered the temple? Possibly helped direct visitors or provided a cup of water to thirsty visitors? Maybe they just kept things clean and organized? Regarding the mirrors, it seems that the women were not very vain for otherwise they would not be ...


2

My understanding, which is not intended to exclude other/different perspectives and answers, is this: Two women were named "Tamar". The historical narratives simply records this fact. If we were intended to draw parallels between the Tamars, the narrative would have emphasized other similarities between them, or at least used similar wording. But apart ...


2

Q#1: Why are such differences presented? Every language has synonyms and synonymous expressions. We use these because using the same expressions again and again is boring, and is often seen as a sign of a poor writer. If I want to communicate the idea that my mother's age is 48, I can say, "she's 48", "she's 48 years old", "she was born 48 years ago", ...


1

Sarah's lifespan was part of an elaborate numerology hidden in the story of the patriarchs. True, her age when she gave birth (90) might have inspired awe among the earliest audience of this story, as would that of Abraham (100) but these numbers were probably chosen mainly because they were easy for tradents to remember as they passed the stories down ...


1

You simply cannot determine gender based on the gender of a noun in any particular language. Otherwise the OT translation from Hebrew to Greek would totally switch the gender of the RUACH/PNEUMA. Which is silly. The context should determine who or what it really is. In this case RUACH is the power of the Creator. Even as the Hebrews understood it. Wisdom ...



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