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18

@Richard offered a decent but limited exegetical understanding of the text (he emphasized the definition of the verb but not the grammar behind it), albeit with a strong complementarian doctrinal bias. @Soldernal offered a good contextual study of the text, and made it clear that Paul permits women to speak elsewhere which is helpful to this discussion ...


16

Who is "she"? To answer your first question, the "she" in verse 15 probably refers back to the she in verse 12 ("she must be silent"). For "she" to refer to Eve would seem like a digression. It's better to think Paul stays on point. What does it mean for her to be "saved through child bearing?" Having read numerous attempts at a reasonable interpretation, ...


16

The Hebrew words in question are עזר כנגדו (ezer kenegdo). The Hebrew root עזר means “help” and the word kenegdo comes from the root word נגד (neged). Neged in the OT always means "opposite" or "across from" and negdo means across from him. In Exodus 19:2, Israel encamp neged hahar, opposite to Mount Sinai. The form kenegedo doesn't appear anywhere else ...


12

According the the NET Bible translator note on the verse: 1 tn Heb “ a woman, a prophetess.” In Hebrew idiom the generic “woman” sometimes precedes the more specific designation. See GKC 437-38 §135.b. Interestingly, since her husband, Lappidoth, is identified the text must reorient itself to point back to Deborah when talking about her leadership ...


11

This passage is not easy to understand, not least because certain interpretations offend many modern sensibilities. There are some (relatively minor) issues of textual criticism and of translation. There are some difficult referents, like "law" in verse 34. Moreover, the "crystal clear" line of total silence for women is difficult to adopt because in 1 ...


10

Looking at the verse, we can see that the command is crystal clear for woman to not speak in church. In fact, it mentions this four times in four different ways: The women are to keep silent they are not permitted to speak let them ask their own husbands at home it is improper for a woman to speak in church To further illustrate the point of silence, ...


9

Jon Ericson has already given a thorough interpretation, but just to answer the Hebrew query in your question: וּדְבוֹרָה אִשָּׁה נְבִיאָה, אֵשֶׁת לַפִּידוֹת--הִיא שֹׁפְטָה אֶת-יִשְׂרָאֵל, בָּעֵת הַהִיא. (From Mechon Mamre) אִשָּׁה (woman) is the feminine form of אִישׁ (man). The other Hebrew words in this passage that are explicitly feminine are: ...


8

The very first miracle Jesus performed was a living illustration of his mission to cleanse. What did Jesus mean that his hour had not yet come? His hour to perform miracles? His mother surely was not asking him to perform a miracle, for he had never even done any miracles. Besides that, he immediately performed the miracle, something he would not have ...


6

I don't have a problem with a change like this. The concept behind "brother" in these contexts is "fellow member of the covenant community." Originally, it applied to Jews only. Then very early Christians began referring to themselves as "brethren" both amongst themselves and to Jews. Acts 1:16 is a great example of that, but there are others in Acts ...


5

John’s extensive marriage theme begins with none other than the wedding of Cana and Jesus’ encounter with His own mother, the first woman to appear in the gospel. When the "mother of Jesus" approaches him about the wedding’s lack of wine, she assumes and expects her son to assume a role that in Jewish custom is specifically reserved for the groom and or ...


5

As for why the KJV used the term "meet", the Old English adjective form means "proper", "suitable" or "precisely adapted to". See the definitions on Dictionary.com, Merriam-Webster.com and TheFreeDictionary.com. I think that in some cases people have reacted to this rather strongly (and unnecessarily) because of the passing resemblance to "meat" - See, God ...


5

This test has many dimensions to it. It has little to do with the guilt or innocence of the woman. In order for the test to apply, the woman must become foolish. This has been interpreted to mean that she has aroused her husband's jealousy by flirting. Or she has aroused the suspicion of witnesses to her flirting, but they have not witnessed adultery, and ...


5

An alternate translation is “assembling” rather than “ministering”; the relevant root is צבא, see, e.g., Wiktionary. Try this translation on for size: He made the washstand of copper and its base of copper; from the mirrors of the assembled [women], who congregated at the entrance of the tent of meeting. The translation of “ministering” is somewhat ...


4

It is the tendency in Greek grammar (and I believe is also common in European languages, before the wide use of what we've come to call politically-correct language) that whenever mixed-gender groups are referred to, the masculine is used. (Smyth, §197a, §1055) So in Romans 1:13, if Paul had wanted to say either "brothers" or "siblings" he would have said ...


4

Under torah a woman does not have standing to bring a legal claim against her husband, nor can she initiate a divorce. It seems to follow, then, that she could not initiate the sotah ritual against a straying husband. (Note that if there has been adultery, then this means the other man's wife, if he is married, has no recourse against him.) According to ...


4

Short Answer: The "hour" that Jesus is referring to here is the hour of His work on the cross. "The reason Jesus gives for the distance he maintains between his mother and himself must be viewed in the light of the cross. . . . the word 'time', literally 'hour' (hora), constantly refers to his death on the cross and the exaltation bound up with it (7:30; ...


4

The entire verse (in Hebrew) reads as follows: לא יהיה כלי גבר על אשה ולא ילבש גבר שׁמלת אשה כי תועבת יהוה אלהיך כל עשׁה אלה ף From right-to-left, these words are: לא - H3808 - Not (when paired with a verb, considered imperative - "Must not") יהיה - H1961 - Be, become, come to pass, happen כלי - H3627 - Article, implement, vessel, object; can include ...


4

In part, Matthew is laying the groundwork for the naming of Jesus, so named because "He will save His people from their sins" (Mt 1:21). In various ways, these women reveal the mess of the Messiah's own family tree. Matthew is not of course implying that the women are the primary sinners in the stories they evoke. But the mention of David without Bathsheba ...


3

Each of these women recognized the expectation of the "Promised Seed" by faith in God's covenant with Abraham and David, respectively. For an amplified discussion of Tamar, Rahab, and Ruth, and their respective goal of the pursuit-and-capture of the "Promised Seed" by faith, please click here. (Please note however that Bathsheba is not mentioned by name in ...


3

My understanding is that Jesus was really challenging the view of woman in the current society even having a serious conversation with a woman. And he, as you note, did have woman disciples: Some time afterward he went on through towns and villages, preaching and proclaiming the good news of the kingdom of God. The twelve were with him, and also some ...


3

The passage here includes the phrase: לֹא תָחוֹס עֵינֶךָ You shall not have pity. This same text also appears in Deut 19:21: וְלֹא תָחוֹס, עֵינֶךָ: נֶפֶשׁ בְּנֶפֶשׁ, עַיִן בְּעַיִן שֵׁן בְּשֵׁן, יָד בְּיָד, רֶגֶל בְּרָגֶל. And thine eye shall not pity: life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot. We ...


3

Calvin and Gill agree that "she" refers to all women. Both take the through to be circumstantial rather than causal; that is, with the sense of passing through rather than by. Having just mentioned how the woman was deceived first, and therefore has the curse of the pain of childbearing upon her, Paul quickly moves to giving comfort that women who persevere ...


3

There is no ambiguity about Deborah’s gender, but I have seen the words usually translated as “wife of Lapidoth” sometimes translated “a fiery woman”.


3

To add to Ami's answer... Genesis 1:27 So God created man in his own image, in the image of God he created him; male and female he created them. No other creature was created in God's image - in the context of the creation account here in Genesis 1, we can infer the nature of mankind is more like God than any other created thing. It follows that, ...


2

When Paul (1Cor 14:33) was refering to the Law he may have used the term in its wider sense as the whole Torah including the 1st Book of Moses where it is stated that (as a consequence of the transgression in Eden) the man would from then on rule over the woman. (Without conflict there would have been no such order.) The Law itself expands on the matter of ...


2

Bible scholar Ben Witherington argues that the peculiar phrasing of this verse—the singular "she" in the subject combined with the plural "they" after the verb, as well as the form of τῆς τεκνογονίας, literally "the childbearing"—points to a particular birth, namely, the birth of Jesus. Moreover, the context indicates that Paul is addressing a ...


2

My understanding, which is not intended to exclude other/different perspectives and answers, is this: Two women were named "Tamar". The historical narratives simply records this fact. If we were intended to draw parallels between the Tamars, the narrative would have emphasized other similarities between them, or at least used similar wording. But apart ...


2

Q#1: Why are such differences presented? Every language has synonyms and synonymous expressions. We use these because using the same expressions again and again is boring, and is often seen as a sign of a poor writer. If I want to communicate the idea that my mother's age is 48, I can say, "she's 48", "she's 48 years old", "she was born 48 years ago", ...


2

Abstract This may also have something to do with 'leaving mother (and father)" and clinging to the wife "church", as talked about in Genesis 2. The Wedding at Cana in Galilee is the first and opening miracle in John’s Gospel. When the wine runs out and Mother Mary says: “They have no wine” Jesus says: “Woman, what does that have to do with ...


2

Those who opposed the custom of women wearing a head covering, as was customary in the middle-east, were those 'inclined to be argumentative'. Paul is not negating any part of his argument but showing how firm his stance was on the issue. Paul always stressed submitting to local cultures and customs. This verse at the end follows a lengthly argument why in ...



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