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-1

I believe that what this scripture is implying is that the law was a tutor. A tutor helps you understand things. The purpose of the Law for the Jews was to point them to there need for the coming messiah who would fulfill that Law and release them from it. The Law was to help bring the understanding that they were incapable of doing it and that the messiah ...


-3

This question comes from the book of Galatians. The entire book of Galatians is about the separation from the law. So first let us understand the law better. For this concept to be really understood I will start by explaining the name of the Lord. in Hebrew the name of the lord is the English word "Be". YHWH = "Be" The word is In the future tense. The ...


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After asking the question, I also found this in the Pulpit Commentary: "Have crucified the flesh (τὴν σάρκα ἐσταύρωσαν). That is, have put it away from them, as a thing to be abhorred, that it might die the death. These three several particulars of thought appear combined in the mixt mode embodied in the word "crucified." The verb, denoting simply affixing ...


1

The truths in the Bible are usually presented in a balanced way, i.e. it is objective and subjective. In simple terms, we can described it using three words: facts, faith, and experience. Facts are God's promises, His redemption, His works, and His free gifts. Faith denotes the way man believes in God, trusts in His work and redemption, and claims His ...


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The Idea in Brief When Paul was converted, he engaged the Jews in Damascus who rejected his testimony. Paul departed Damascus, and traveled to Arabia, which was the sanctuary of Elijah and Moses when they too were rejected by the Jewish people. After Paul had returned to Damascus, he faced not only more hostility, but death. He then escaped Damascus through ...


4

The texts in question In Act 9:20-28 we read: Acts 9:20 Immediately he preached the Christ in the synagogues, that He is the Son of God. 21 Then all who heard were amazed, and said, "Is this not he who destroyed those who called on this name in Jerusalem, and has come here for that purpose, so that he might bring them bound to the chief ...


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The question appears to attempt to harmonise Paul's Epistle to the Galatians with Acts of the Apostles by defining a sequence of events that minimises apparent contradictions. Scholars and theologians such as John Shelby Spong (Born of a Woman, page 109) point out that Galatians 1:16-17 and Acts 9:19-29 give very different accounts of Paul’s travels from ...


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When he says observe days and months and years. He was clearly speaking about mosaic law in the chapters. Because he says beggarly elements, maybe some of them worshiped tree spirits or star gods too, either way one is believing the law can save you, the other is idolatry and paganism. Both are falling back to the flesh. I know people have taken astrology ...


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Interesting Q&A! No time for proper reply/interaction now :( so just to note that -- as you probably realize -- none of ##1-4 require speech to continue beyond v. 14, so they are suggestive at best. Also, recent commentators (I'm thinking of Longenecker and Martyn) look to Hans Dieter Betz's substantial study of this problem and opt (with him) for the ...


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According to Meyer's NT Commentary, many commentators have taken different positions on this question, those that view 15-21 as a continuation include Chrysostom, Theodoret, Jerome, Estius, Bengel, Rosenmüller, Tittmann, Knapp, Flatt, Winer, Rückert, Schott, Baumgarten-Crusius, de Wette and Möller, Hilgenfeld, Ewald and Holsten. Those opposed include ...


-3

For all who rely on works of the law are under a curse First off it's only those who rely on works of the law that are under it's curse. So what it is saying is that if you have no faith in Messiah then you are living totally by works and you will fail at that. We need to realize that the Israelite's had faith in the same thing as "Christians" (for lack ...


2

The referent of the phrase "Him who called you"could potentially be answered in several ways. (1)It could refer to Paul himself. He (along with Barnabas) was the missionairy who came to Galatia preaching the gospel. he was the instrument God used to awaken faith in the Galatians, see Acts 16:16. However Paul makes it clear in v8, he himself was not the ...


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In regard to τοῦ καλέσαντος ὑμᾶς “the one who called you” in Galatians 1:6, D. Francois Tolmie says: “As a rule, Paul uses this expression to refer to God, but it could also refer to himself in this case …” D. Francois Tolmie, Persuading the Galatians: A Text-centred Rhetorical Analysis of a Pauline Letter, 2005, pp39-40. For those who are ...


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The many references to famine are true but one thing which seems odd is the slowness of response. Famine relief needs to be fast yet this collection takes a long time and Paul is revisiting churches and waiting at least one winter while organising it and moving the silver(?) with a group of men. I would suggest that this is as much about sharing capital as ...



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