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6

It is helpful to understand the purpose(s) of the Mosaic Law. Quickly: It was intended to point people to their need for a Savior (Gal 3:19; Rom 5:20). It was intended to highlight their sinful nature (Rom 7:7). It taught many aspects of God and peoples' relationship to him. For examples, the sacrificial system was a reminder of humanity's need for a ...


5

According to Meyer's NT Commentary, many commentators have taken different positions on this question, those that view 15-21 as a continuation include Chrysostom, Theodoret, Jerome, Estius, Bengel, Rosenmüller, Tittmann, Knapp, Flatt, Winer, Rückert, Schott, Baumgarten-Crusius, de Wette and Möller, Hilgenfeld, Ewald and Holsten. Those opposed include ...


4

The texts in question In Act 9:20-28 we read: Acts 9:20 Immediately he preached the Christ in the synagogues, that He is the Son of God. 21 Then all who heard were amazed, and said, "Is this not he who destroyed those who called on this name in Jerusalem, and has come here for that purpose, so that he might bring them bound to the chief ...


3

Paul is not placing a curse on the Galatians but is defending his teaching against the Jewish law code. In Galatians 3:1-4, Paul calls the Galatians stupid because they have been informed that Jesus was crucified, and should have faith in what they heard, not in supposed benefits in observing the law. In the second part of verse 3:10, Paul is quoting from ...


3

When Yahveh offered the Torah (Law of Moses) to the Israelites, He dictated all the terms of the covenant (the Torah was the Old Covenant). One of the terms was that the Israelites would be "cursed" (אָרוּר) if they did not do everything commanded of them in the Torah. In Deu. 27:26, it is written, Cursed is he who does not confirm the words of this ...


2

In Rom 1:8-10, Paul's blessing refers to the strong faith of the Romans; in 1 Cor 1:4-6 likewise, as Paul thanks God for their faith; 2 Cor 1:2-7 differs only in that the blessing is in the form of words of comfort; 1 Thess 2-4 is again gives thanks for their faith. Compare this to Galatians, where Paul wishes the Galatians well (Gal 1:2) but omits the ...


2

You need to look at these verses in their context. The Εpistle to the Galatians begins as follows (as there are no serious textual or interpretational issues here I will cite only the KJV): 1 Paul, an apostle, (not of men, neither by man, but by Jesus Christ, and God the Father, who raised him from the dead;) 2 and all the brethren which are with me, ...


2

The referent of the phrase "Him who called you"could potentially be answered in several ways. (1)It could refer to Paul himself. He (along with Barnabas) was the missionairy who came to Galatia preaching the gospel. he was the instrument God used to awaken faith in the Galatians, see Acts 16:16. However Paul makes it clear in v8, he himself was not the ...


2

In regard to τοῦ καλέσαντος ὑμᾶς “the one who called you” in Galatians 1:6, D. Francois Tolmie says: “As a rule, Paul uses this expression to refer to God, but it could also refer to himself in this case …” D. Francois Tolmie, Persuading the Galatians: A Text-centred Rhetorical Analysis of a Pauline Letter, 2005, pp39-40. For those who are ...


2

And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because thou hast hearkened to my voice." Genesis 22:18 LXX kai eneuloghqhsontai en tw spermati sou panta ta eqnh ths ghs anq¢ wn uphkousas ths emhs fwnhs Note the use of the singular seed (spermati) Paul probably has in mind the LXX translation of the verse . Anyway, offspring can be understood ...


2

The angel Gabriel had already foretold that John would receive the Holy Spirit even before his birth. 13 ... Your wife Elizabeth will bear you a son, and you are to call him John. 14 He will be a joy and delight to you, and many will rejoice because of his birth, 15 for he will be great in the sight of the Lord. He is never to take wine or other ...


2

The Idea in Brief When Paul was converted, he engaged the Jews in Damascus who rejected his testimony. Paul departed Damascus, and traveled to Arabia, which was the sanctuary of Elijah and Moses when they too were rejected by the Jewish people. After Paul had returned to Damascus, he faced not only more hostility, but death. He then escaped Damascus through ...


1

The truths in the Bible are usually presented in a balanced way, i.e. it is objective and subjective. In simple terms, we can described it using three words: facts, faith, and experience. Facts are God's promises, His redemption, His works, and His free gifts. Faith denotes the way man believes in God, trusts in His work and redemption, and claims His ...


1

No, not necessarily. I even doubt embryonic John was filled with the Holy Spirit, since the passage does not warrant that conclusion, since it clearly says ". . . and Elizabeth was filled with the Holy Spirit" (v.41, my emphasis) I believe a better question would be: "What is the significance of Elizabeth's exclamation, "'As soon as the ...


1

I don't think a "concrete," "certain," answer can be given ... However, perhaps there is a plausible explanation given the period, and given cultures at work: Titus, Timothy, Galatians, had notable issues regarding Gentile Christians and the controversy of Pharasaic/Rabbinic doctrines and traditions being taught in the Churches. In view of this, it ...


1

"When he who had set me apart before I was born, and who called me by his grace, was pleased to reveal his Son to me ... I went away into Arabia, and returned again to Damascus. Then after three years I went up to Jerusalem to visit Cephas and remained with him fifteen days ... ... Then I went into the regions of Syria and Cilicia. And I was still ...


1

The translation of the New Testament in the New International Version (NIV) is based upon "the Koine Greek language editions of the United Bible Societies and of Nestle-Aland."(1) Specifically, it is based on the Nestle-Aland 27th edition. The Greek text of the NA27 states: ὅτι δέ ἐστε υἱοί ἐξαπέστειλεν ὁ θεὸς τὸ πνεῦμα τοῦ υἱοῦ αὐτοῦ εἰς τὰς καρδίας ...


1

Interesting question, and several thought-evoking answers. One point that I find missing: John was raised in a dispensation wherein the Holy Spirit came upon people rather than when the Spirit came to abide within men. It seems that the text defining that he would be filled with the Holy Spirit even before birth must be considered in light of the applied ...


1

You've probably already consulted commentators on who these brothers/brethren may have been. If so, you likely realize your question is a difficult one to answer with any degree of certainty. Some commentators are not even sure if Paul was addressing churches in Northern or Southern Galatia, although the popular opinion seems to be he was addressing the ...


1

In Romans 1-3, Paul teaches the Gentiles without the law of Moses were guilty of sin before God and the Jews who were under the law of Moses were also guilty of sin before God concluding that all have sinned. Contextually Romans 3:28 refers to the law of Moses. Today we a justified by a system of faith that is separate from the works of the law of Moses. In ...


1

I've always understood it as the "manifestation of sin in the presence of the Law," but more specifically "the penalty of sin the the presence of the law." Here's how I've explained it in teaching this passage: If there were no speeding laws you could drive fast and recklessly — and although dangerous and potentially harmful, there's no "curse." But once ...


1

Israel was carried "On Eagles Wings" as she was led from Egypt, to Sinai where God visibly appeared to her and made an Everlasting Covenant with her; making her a chosen people unto Himself, and a great nation, which would strike terror and dread amongst her enemies, and be a sign to all the nations of the earth that God was with them. He sanctified her, and ...


1

Another possible (though less likely) interpretation is that the Greek word translated as especially in the ESV (malista Strong's #3122) should be translated as namely, or that is to say. This would give the sense: So then, as we have opportunity, let us do good to everyone, viz. to those who are of the household of faith. In other words, in this ...


1

Part of Paul's intention that we may undervalue, if we view it as somewhat transcendental, is his desire to increase the praise from the earth to God, who admittedly deserves all praise. Paul lists praise to God as one desired result of this offering (2 Corinthians 9:12-13). He contrasts the world's religions with the fact that God deserves eternal praise ...


1

I realize this is an older thread. But, I would like to point out that Paul, who was an Hebrew of the Hebrews (Phil. 3:5) having been raised in Judaism and zealous of the law, included himself among those who were in "bondage to the elements of the world" Ga:4:3: Even so we, when we were children, were in bondage under the elements of the world: And by ...


1

According to Strong, χάριν (charin) (in v19) means "through favor of, that is, on account of". YLT reads "on account of the transgressions." The CLNT has it, "On behalf of transgressions" - it is as though "Transgressions" were one party in relationship to the other party, the Jews. Strong also suggests χείρ (cheir) can mean "the hand (literally or ...



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