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11

This is an interesting question that seems to divide people. The two major opinions are that it either is ("almost certainly") the same event or that it is ("absolutely") not the same event. The people who believe it is not the same event seem to be the most vocal since (1) they have textual discrepancies on their side and (2) they are going against the ...


8

To understand what Paul is saying here in Galatians 2:17-18 it is helpful to read the context starting from Galatians 2:3-14. However, to cut to the chase - Paul "destroyed" or "tore down" the idea that a person can be justified by the Abrahamic/Mosaic laws of circumcision/diet. When Paul states, "...I prove that I am a lawbreaker.", he is saying that if ...


8

Short Answer: Yes, they would know what he meant The longer answer is that the letter to the church in Rome (1:7) was to a mixed group of Gentiles (1:13) and Jews (2:17). Most believe the church started from some of the Jews present at Peter's preaching during Pentecost, the "visitors from Rome" (Act 2:10; NKJV/ESV/NASB). Starting at 2:17, Paul begins more ...


7

Galatians is directed to Gentiles who were being persuaded to become circumcised and adopt the Mosaic law (Torah). The lapse which Paul mentions in the verse following does not mean that they had followed the law previously. Rather, he has an overarching salvation-historical shift in mind. The world prior to (and outside of) Christ is made up of "elements" ...


7

They were primarily bi-lingual Note: unattributed links are to general knowledge found on Wikipedia and primarily for the historical background. Alexander the Great made his conquests during the early 4th c. BC, at which time Hellenization first occurred in the area (which in part actively sought the teaching of the Greek language). The Celtic invasion of ...


6

The OP quote from James in Acts is consistent with requiring the Gentiles to adhere to the seven commandments to bnei Noah, but not to "trouble" them with the other 606 commandments still required of the nation of Israel, at least not immediately as a prerequisite for learning the Torah. James's opinion might indicate that the Gentiles should then study the ...


6

Paul's Argument Paul spends a lot of time demonstrating the incompatibility of Christ and justification by works. If the appeal did not come from people claiming to serve Christ, that sort of argumentation is unnecessary. I am shocked that you are so quickly deserting the one calling you in the grace of Christ [in order to follow] a different gospel. ...


6

Cultural Setting I don't think there are any hard-and-fast rules about whether tutors or guardians would remain to advise the grown child, but it seems more likely than not that they would remain part of the household. For one thing, tutors were often slaves owned by the patriarch (or sometimes close relations). Second, tutors usually were retained to ...


6

In Galatians 5:25, "live" is "live" as in "live or die" rather than "live" as in "the way I live my life". In other words, "If the Spirit is what saves us from death, let us allow that same Spirit to direct our steps" This is reinforced in chapter 6 with a different metaphor: 8 For the one who sows to his own flesh will from the flesh reap corruption, ...


6

According to early church interpretation it's the law or the works of the law.1 1: Tertullian, adv. Marc., 5,3,8; Eusebius of Emesa, in Gal.; Ephrem, in Gal.; Augustinus, Exp. Gal. 16,7-10; Ambrosiaster; Theodoret of Cyrus


6

Galatians (like all of Paul's letters) contains long strings of argument that overlap and merge. So it's difficult to know where to start. For the sake of argument, let's start with Galatians 3:15-18 (ESV): To give a human example, brothers: even with a man-made covenant, no one annuls it or adds to it once it has been ratified. Now the promises were ...


6

No Blunder at All The word "seed," whether Hebrew or English, is often used in a figurative sense to refer to one descending from another (and not normally to the actual sperm or egg of the parent that is the source of propagation). The word can have a singular or a collective meaning. Even a collective meaning, however, is viewing the individual elements ...


5

The NET Bible has something interesting to say about this word: Or “disciplinarian,” “custodian,” or “guide.” According to BDAG 748 s.v. παιδαγωγός, “the man, usu. a slave…whose duty it was to conduct a boy or youth…to and from school and to superintend his conduct gener.; he was not a ‘teacher’ (despite the present mng. of the derivative ...


5

"Is it a good interpretation of the phrase?" In substance, yes--context shows it is the Jewish holidays being referred to. Martin Luther, in his Commentary on Galatians, agrees, commenting on "days and months and times and years" with: The Apostle Paul knew what the false apostles were teaching the Galatians: The observance of days, and months, and ...


5

As you're already aware, the NASB is giving a near-literal translation of the verse. What remains to be done by the reader, then, is the interpretation: What does Paul mean that he is confident "in you in the Lord" (εἰς ὑμᾶς ἐν κυρίῳ)? The NLT includes an interpretation in its translation for the reader. In this case, they understand that Paul's confidence ...


5

An alternative explanation could just be rooted in practicality. The pattern had already been established by the Antiochene church in Acts 11:27-30. Agabus predicted an imminent famine and the church in Antioch. There were many famines during Claudius's reign (41-54), the most severe of which occurred in Judea around 46-47. Because of the imminent threat, ...


5

The Greek text of Galatians 6:10 reads: Ἄρα οὖν ὡς καιρὸν ἔχομεν, ἐργαζώμεθα1 τὸ ἀγαθὸν πρὸς πάντας, μάλιστα δὲ πρὸς τοὺς οἰκείους τῆς πίστεως.2 A literal translation of this passage is: Consequently therefore, as we have opportunity, let us do good to all, and especially to those of the household of faith. The double connective at the ...


4

Good question. There are many fascinating aspects of Paul's hermeneutic that come to the fore here, and we need to do some digging to recognize the source of the connections which he makes. How is Hagar connected to Sinai? First, the connection is there simply in terms of Paul's own controlling metaphor. Throughout Gal 3:22 and onward, Paul has been ...


4

Abstract Paul is making an argument in Galatians that the Gentiles are recipients of God's promise to Abraham via Jesus. The "Old Covenant" is "old" because it has been replaced by the prior covenant. Similarly, the "New Covenant" was given to Abraham first, but only implemented in Christ later. The timeline is: Abram received the promise off ...


4

I see no reason at all to take this as a statement about the quality of eternal life. After all, there's no reason to think that Paul is here discussing how they will reap a greater/lesser (whichever way you want to go) quality of corruption if they sow to the flesh. Indirectly related, lessening "eternal life" to rewards in heaven instead of resurrection ...


4

In classic Greek, the word has an astounding variety of meaning: I. in a form of sun-dial, the shadow of the gnomon, the length of which in feet indicated the time of day... II. element 1. a simple sound of speech, as the first component of the syllable... 2. in Physics, στοιχεῖα were the components into which matter is ultimately divisible, ...


4

Not really, unless we imagine the decision of the Council is at odds not only with Paul's wishes, but also with what Peter stated during the course of the argument (describing the yoke of Torah as something that "neither our fathers nor we have been able to bear," Acts 15:10). According to Acts, Paul certainly seems to have thought the decision was a ...


4

It seems probable that when Paul was blinded on the Damascus road and subsequently healed at the hands of Ananias, the healing was partial and his eyes continued to give him ongoing trouble. This is strongly hinted at in the immediate context of Gal 4:13; in v 15, Paul says that had it been possible, the Galatians would have plucked out their own eyes and ...


4

One possibility is that it came out of the meeting in Jerusalem described in Galatians 2, where Paul writes: and when James and Cephas and John, who were acknowledged pillars, recognized the grace that had been given to me, they gave to Barnabas and me the right hand of fellowship, agreeing that we should go to the Gentiles and they to the circumcised. ...


4

Peter was present when the gospel was first introduce to the Gentiles — Cornelius being the first. Peter was the first (or was present) for the introduction of the gospel to all major groups (Jews, Samaritans, Gentiles). That does not means that that was Peter's primary mission field. Paul's primary mission field was initially to Jews living outside of ...


4

This question is too good to have no answers, but I fear my answer will not do it justice. I hope others will take a shot at it as well - even if for no other reason than to prove me wrong. 1) Paul is converted on the way to Damascus (let's call this year 0) Acts 9:8 Then Saul arose from the ground, and when his eyes were opened he saw no one. But they ...


4

It is not about grammar but about the mystical interpretation of Abraham's seed that both the Hebrew and the Greek scriptures argue according to Pauline theology: He is not laying stress on the particular word used, but on the fact that a singular noun of some kind, a collective term, is employed, where τὰ τέκνα or οἱ ἀπόγονοι for instance might ...


3

It seems from the context (see Gal. 3) that Paul was not rejecting holidays, even Jewish ones, rather, he was making the point to them that since we have been saved, we are free from the bondage of the law and should not enslave ourselves again. He was telling them that as we have been saved by faith, we should also walk by faith, not trusting in the works ...


3

"Days and months and seasons and years" does indeed refer to the levitical calendar (corresponding to weekly sabbaths, new moons, annual festivals, and sabbatical years). Paul likely uses the generic language (as opposed to the more specific terms used in Col 2:16) in order to place Torah's calendar into the same class as the various calendrical observances ...


3

I know that this is an old topic, but for what it's worth, there may be some credibility to taking Paul's meaning to include "heavenly bodies." The Galatians were migrant Gauls, or Celts, whose primary religion was Druidism, which was a form of animism. In Galatians 4:8, Paul says "Formerly... you did not know God, you were enslaved to those that by nature ...



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