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6

Another answer addressed the issue of Samaritan rejection of one traveling to Jerusalem, so I will attempt to address your other question: Why does this use "his face" instead of simply "him"? What is the difference supposed to be? The difference is a Semitic flavor and the emphatic sense of the Semitic idiom behind it. The word πρόσωπον = face is ...


3

The original question contained a link to the interesting article by Rendsburg 1988: http://jewishstudies.rutgers.edu/docman/rendsburg/64-the-mock-of-baal-in-1-kings-18-27/file Has anyone else looked at it? The author argues that śiăḥ and śiḡ are a hendiadys. śiḡ or siḡ is well-known in the meaning “go away, step aside”, and can thus reasonably be ...


2

In addition to several of the meanings of Salt given here in other answers, the word Salary is derived from the latin "salarium" which is associated with Roman soldiers who were paid in salt according to Roman historian Pliny the Elder in Plinius Naturalis Historia XXXI. In this writing he states "[I]n Rome... the soldier's pay was originally salt and the ...


2

There are only 4 instances of kə·sūṯ (Strong's H3682) in the Old Testament: Genesis 20:16, Job 24:7, Job 26:6 and Job 31:19, each of which is associated with "covering" nakedness. Adding to that the "thou shalt not uncover the nakedness of" expression of the KJV in Leviticus 18, becoming "you shall not have sexual relations with" in the NIV, there can be ...


2

Greek Text and English Translation The Greek text of Col. 2:11 states, ἐν ᾧ καὶ περιετμήθητε περιτομῇ ἀχειροποιήτῳ ἐν τῇ ἀπεκδύσει τοῦ σώματος τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν τῆς σαρκός ἐν τῇ περιτομῇ τοῦ Χριστοῦ TR, 1550 which is translated as, in whom you also were circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, by the stripping away of the body of the sins ...


2

One Subordinate Clause or Two? The offered phrase suggests the last five Greek words of Lk.10:18 form one subordinate clause, that Jesus said Satan is like ‘lightning falling from heaven’ (i.e. Satan falls from heaven like lighting falls from heaven). Some English translations allow or may suggest this reading (e.g. NASB, NIV). But what would that ...


1

Throughout the Old and New Testaments, there was a strong connection between serpents, evil and the underworld and this connection extended into most other mesopotamian cultures as well. Because of this association, serpents developed a highly negative connotation and any association with them was thus considered offensive. This however is a pretty ...


1

Textual Variants πᾶς γὰρ πυρὶ ἁλισθήσεται καὶ πᾶσα θυσία ἀλὶ ἁλισθήσεται (Textus Receptus, 1550) πᾶς γὰρ πυρὶ ἁλισθήσεται (NA28) According to Constantin Tischendorf's critical apparatus, (This exegesis maintains the lengthier variant.) Exegesis of Mark 9:49 The conjunction γὰρ ("for") The conjunction γὰρ connects Mark 9:49 with the ...



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