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16

Short answer: No. You shouldn't. And that's basically because, to use the quote that is mis-attributed to Freud: "Sometimes a cigar is simply a cigar." It is possible that a literal reading will work fine here. She uncovers his actual feet (and lies down there, in a humble position), which eventually wakes him. Despite being startled (v8) (perhaps by ...


11

In the Hebrew Bible, salt is both a disinfectant and preservative, but if the salt loses its integrity (or its "flavor" to preserve) the result is disintegration. When Jesus talked about salt "trampled under feet," he was referring to this latter connotation of disintegration found in the Hebrew Bible. So when salt maintains its integrity (or its "flavor" to ...


10

Read in isolation, 2 Kings 4:38-41 can be understood as a story about a foul tasting soup that Elisha improved by adding a new flavor. However, the context in II Kings is miracles performed by Elisha to save people from death by famine. From within that context it seems that the "death in the pot," was an actual danger that required Elisha's intervention. ...


9

Summarizing Hastings Dictionary of Christ and the Gospels entry on wine bottles: In ancient Israel, the grapes were pressed in the winepress and left in the collection vats for a few days. Fermentation starts immediately on pressing, and this allows the first "tumultuous" (gassy) phase to pass. Then the must (fermenting juice) was put in clay jars to be ...


9

In Hebrew writing, it is common to express the same idea twice but using two different phrasings or metaphors. For example, in Micah 4:3, the prophet writes: and they shall beat their swords into plowshares,     and their spears into pruning hooks; The same idea is given twice: instruments of war will become instruments of ...


7

Ruth instigates her right to remarriage to Boaz as the next of kin by uncovering his feet. This imagery of foot uncovering (in the context of the kinsman-redeemer) comes from the Law of Moses - Deuteronomy 25:9 (NASB) 9 Then shall his brother's wife come unto him in the presence of the elders, and loose his shoe from off his foot, and spit in his face, ...


7

I guess I prefer the "on earth" reading because the "life without God" reading requires a bit more pressing. I also wonder if the sun plays such an important role in Ecclesiastes because they may represent a common set of wisdom that was not specific to just Qoheleth. There are apparently some interesting parallels between Eccl. and Egyptian literature and ...


6

As I've looked into it further, I think we have something along the lines of connotation verses denotation. The denotative meaning of the phrase "under the sun" in Ecclesiastes is "on earth," and this is neutral in meaning. Something being "under the sun" just means it is on the earth. Indeed, "within the realm of God's dominion" would fit there. ...


6

After Jesus becomes harsh and gets the scribes' and Pharisees' attention, Matthew 12:34 (NASB) “You brood of vipers, how can you, being evil, speak what is good? For the mouth speaks out of that which fills the heart.” two verses later he reminds and warns them of judgment day. Matthew 12:36-37 (NASB) “But I tell you that every careless ...


6

Another answer addressed the issue of Samaritan rejection of one traveling to Jerusalem, so I will attempt to address your other question: Why does this use "his face" instead of simply "him"? What is the difference supposed to be? The difference is a Semitic flavor and the emphatic sense of the Semitic idiom behind it. The word πρόσωπον = face is ...


5

The full verse of Matthew 24.29 reads in Greek: Matthew 24.29, NA28 Εὐθέως δὲ μετὰ τὴν θλῖψιν τῶν ἡμερῶν ἐκείνων ὁ ἥλιος σκοτισθήσεται, καὶ ἡ σελήνη οὐ δώσει τὸ φέγγος αὐτῆς, καὶ οἱ ἀστέρες πεσοῦνται ἀπὸ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ, καὶ αἱ δυνάμεις τῶν οὐρανῶν σαλευθήσονται. Or in English: Matthew 24.29, NRSV translation ‘Immediately after the suffering ...


5

This is a great question, but please allow me to provide some background first in order to answer this question. First, there are two "sacraments" in view: baptism and the bread & cup. Paul indicates that the Israelites coming from Egypt were "baptized" and subsequently ate the manna (bread) and spiritual drink (cup). However, they did not enter the ...


4

With above sentences the writer (not sure if this is Agur or the son of Jakeh) is talking about the 7th and 4th item. For example: 3 things amazes him and there is even a 4th thing that amazes him even more. The book of Proverbs is completely in poetic form. It contains different variations and combinations of basic forms of parallelism, a distinguishing ...


4

Psalm 140:9-11 provides one possible answer, since there appears the same parallel of coals falling upon the head. Most English translations group verses 9-11 as one paragraph; the LXX and Masoretic Text (MT) group the entire psalm as one unit. Psalm 140:9-11 (NASB) 9 As for the head of those who surround me, May the mischief of their lips cover ...


4

His Kingdom Prophecy lists a couple of interesting interpretations. for example, they quote Kenneth Samuel Wuest (1893-1962): In Bible times an oriental needed to keep his hearth fire going all the time in order to insure fire for cooking and warmth. If it went out, he had to go to a neighbour for some live coals of fire. These he would carry on ...


4

Translators often point out these sorts of puns in footnotes and they are even more commonly mentioned in commentaries. For instance, here's one I found many years ago when I read the NIV Study Bible: Genesis 40:12-13 (NIV) “This is what it means, ” Joseph said to him. “The three branches are three days. Within three days Pharaoh will lift up your ...


3

You can if you want, because the Hebrew word for "foot" and "leg" coincide. So she could have been exposing as much of the leg as you desire, including up to the waist. But the connotation of sex is subtle. A similar construction occurs in Judges 5 regarding Ya'el, Chever's wife, Wikisource translation here Between her legs he crouched, fell, lay.(S) ...


3

The word in Hebrew, verse 40, is maveth. It means death, as in pestilence. It is used in the Bible where death and destruction is conveyed as a meaning. It's not talking about bitterness. The message is, the prophet intervenes for these men due to Yahweh's mercy. Ref.: Gesenius's Lexicon of Hebrew and English and my knowledge of Hebrew.


3

I will answer your “Question 1”, as this is not addressed in the earlier question. In Classical Greek πιστεύω means “trust, put faith in, rely on” and takes an object in the dative or accusative; it is never (as far as I can see) construed with the prepositions ἐν or εἰς. This construction is, however, commonplace in LXX and NT, e.g. Ps. 77:22, where ὅτι ...


3

The original question contained a link to the interesting article by Rendsburg 1988: http://jewishstudies.rutgers.edu/docman/rendsburg/64-the-mock-of-baal-in-1-kings-18-27/file Has anyone else looked at it? The author argues that śiăḥ and śiḡ are a hendiadys. śiḡ or siḡ is well-known in the meaning “go away, step aside”, and can thus reasonably be ...


2

Under the sun—how beautiful is the poetry of the Old Testament! The swasheck and Frank Luke's answers, as well as the question itself, all contain some helpful thoughts. However, I think they have still failed to capture the full sense of the phrase. I would argue that its meaning is somewhere between in the physical world and life without God: more ...


2

A wild gourd is just that. A gourd which grows in the wild. It would be difficult to say which species of gourd it might be though. "There was no more death in the pot" has also been translated "there was no more bitterness in the pot" or "there was no more harm in the pot". Starch, by my understanding, does have the ability to mitigate certain bitterness ...


2

To answer the first part of your question, the foundations and pillars of the earth were thought to be distinct from the earth itself. These were the structure which actually held up the earth. It may be helpful to visualize the Ancient Middle Eastern conception of cosmology to better understand:


2

OP: Is this a figure of speech? No, the "graded numerical sayings" are not "figures of speech". It is more accurate to describe this "n + 1" pattern in biblical poetry in terms of "rhetoric" (or "stylistics") rather than a "figure of speech" which normally has to do with non-literal language (e.g., metaphor, simile). Although "graded numerical ...


2

The language of Luke 10:18 "ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ πεσόντα" echoes the Language of Isa 14:12 in the LXX "ἐξέπεσεν ἐκ τοῦ οὐρανοῦ". In the excellent book "Commentary on the New Testament use of the Old Testement" (Beale & Carson) it is pointed out that Jewish tradition also applies Is 14:12 to the fall of Satan as Jesus Christ does, they cite: 2 Enoch 29:3 ...


2

One Subordinate Clause or Two? The offered phrase suggests the last five Greek words of Lk.10:18 form one subordinate clause, that Jesus said Satan is like ‘lightning falling from heaven’ (i.e. Satan falls from heaven like lighting falls from heaven). Some English translations allow or may suggest this reading (e.g. NASB, NIV). But what would that ...


2

Greek Text and English Translation The Greek text of Col. 2:11 states, ἐν ᾧ καὶ περιετμήθητε περιτομῇ ἀχειροποιήτῳ ἐν τῇ ἀπεκδύσει τοῦ σώματος τῶν ἁμαρτιῶν τῆς σαρκός ἐν τῇ περιτομῇ τοῦ Χριστοῦ TR, 1550 which is translated as, in whom you also were circumcised with the circumcision made without hands, by the stripping away of the body of the sins ...



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