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8

The question, launched from a rendering of Ezekiel 6:3, is: What is the purpose of "I, even I" as opposed to just saying "I"? Two observations, first on the translation, second on the Hebrew which gave rise to it. (1) First of all, then, note that the "I, even I" translation of Ezek 6:3 is limited to a very particular translation tradition. Picking up ...


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The practice is not well understood, although it has long been claimed to be part of indigenous culture from time immemorial (well, from Ezekiel's time,1 anyway!) up to the present day. From antiquity, the evidence from Galen is often cited (see, e.g., Keil below). It comes up in his De sanitate tuenda, often known in English as "Galen's Hygiene". The ...


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The Main Difference is Whether to View it as Eschatological or Not The "Christian symbolic" or "spiritual" view believes the symbolism represents aspects of the church now (during the present time, in this age), and is a common view of amillennialists. Whereas the "apocalyptic" view still sees the vision referring to eschatological (yet future) realities ...


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A "Literal" Hermeneutic The grammatical-historical (literal) hermeneutic recognizes symbolism in language, but differs from symbolic and apocalyptic interpretations of Ezekiel's temple because of its commitment to take Scripture's communication at face value unless something clearly deems otherwise. So in Ezekiel's vision of the temple, the literal ...


3

The Idea in Brief Ezekiel was despondent, which appears to be the meaning of the ESV translation "overwhelmed." That is, the Spirit of the Lord was upon him to prophesy, but he was despondent for several days, which left the exiles in silence. Discussion First, the verb מַשְׁמִים (mašmîm) is a hifil participle from √šmm "to lie deserted; to lie stiff ...


3

Ezekiel identifies the current time as the fifth year of King Jehoiachin's exile (the next verse, Ezekiel 1.2). Ezekiel proceeds to give dates according to this exile. (Notice Ezekiel's prophecies are not all arranged in chronological order.) the sixth year (8.1) the seventh year (20.1) the ninth year (24.1) the tenth year (29.1) the eleventh year (26.1; ...


3

The Hebrew verb עָשָׂה (asah) is frequently used in conjunction with the direct object מִשְׁפָּט (mishpat) in the Hebrew Tanakh. In the context of the laity, it typically means keeping the commandments of the Law of Moses as instructed (Lev. 18:2-4). In the context of judges, it typically means judging righteously according to the Law of Moses (Lev. 19:15). ...


3

When the book of Ezekiel opens, the first two units (chapters 1-7 and 8-11) consist of back-to-back visions of God's throne-chariot, carried by the cherubim. In chapter 1, Ezekiel takes his time describing the cherubim, but when his account moves to the throne itself, he becomes vague and sketchy: And above the dome over their heads there was something ...


2

In answer to your question concerning the wording of Ezekiel 6:3; namely, "'Behold, I, even I, will bring a sword upon you, and I will destroy your high places'" (Ezekiel 6:3), I direct you to this web site Bible.org which includes the following footnote: "Hebrew, 'Look I, I am bringing.' The repetition of the pronoun draws attention to the ...


2

As was described in this Mi Yodeya article, priests only actually worked in the temple for 2 days a year. This is a result of the priests being divided up into 24 groups (mishmarim) for Temple service, with each group being further subdivided by family. So even priests over the age of thirty would have had a lot of time on their hands to do things other ...


2

Rashi points out an interesting fact about the threefold division (bold mine): Le zent in O. F., the 100 (zuz weight). Menahem, however, connected it to the word מִנְיָן, a number (p. 118). We have here 240 “zuz,” [four zuz to a shekel]. From here we derive that the “maneh” of the Sanctuary was double, and they added a sixth to it in Ezekiel’s time, ...


1

The general opinion of scholars seems to be that Ezekiel's bared arm signified the Lord's hostility toward his people and/or his readiness to act against them. Dr. Thomas Constable of Dallas Theological Seminary says Ezekiel's act of facing Jerusalem with his arm bared signified Yahweh's hostility toward his people [Constable's Notes]. Lamar Cooper suggests ...


1

The Book of Ezekiel has been identified as one of the most difficult to study. The theme often changes dramatically from chapter to chapter, returning in a later chapter to a previous theme. The overall theme of the book is God's anger with Jerusalem because the people worship other gods, and he has chosen the priest Ezekiel to warn them, especially the ...



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