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11

The Tetragram in Hebrew is a proper name, and names do not have articles in Hebrew any more than they do in English. The article "the" arises in OP's KJV example because of the convention (beginning as early as the Septuagint) of representing the divine name by the word "Lord", which then has the knock on effect of requiring an article in English usage. ...


8

I don't know of any scholar who denies that Hammurabi wrote a code of laws before Moses received the Ten Commandments and the accompanying law. So if the question is: Did Moses invent the idea of having a written code of laws, the answer is clearly "no". But if the question is: Were the specific set of laws in the Ten Commandments et al not really written ...


7

Frequently, an "Angel of the LORD" will appear in passages throughout the Bible to bring a message to an individual. In these instances, the speech used is always that of God himself. Tradition held that messages came with the full authority, weight, and force of the person who sent it. This messenger was an extension of the originator of the messenger ...


7

There's a subtle shift in how the narrative refers to Pharaoh and the army part way through the account. We can see the first method in the first question: Q: Does the Pharaoh actually leave with the army to chase the Israelites? A: Yes Exodus 14:7 So he made ready his chariot and took his army with him, (ESV) The Pharaoh is spoken of directly. Prior ...


7

The Ark (Heb. אָרוֹן) was known as "the Ark of the testimony" (אֲרוֹן הָעֵדֻת cp. Exo. 25:22) and "the Ark of the covenant" (אֲרוֹן הַבְּרִית cp. Jos. 3:6) (among other things) since the two stone tablets contained therein were known as "the two tablets of the testimony" (שְׁנֵי לֻחֹת הָעֵדֻת; cp. Exo. 31:18) and "the two tablets of the covenant" (שְׁנֵי ...


5

Is there any evidence that this phrase should be translated 'ganja'? No. Exodus 30:23 (ESV) reads: Take the finest spices: of liquid myrrh 500 shekels, and of sweet-smelling cinnamon half as much, that is, 250, and 250 of aromatic cane (qənêh-bōśem) The OP points out: there is a speculation that kaneh bosem is a plural form of kaneh ...


5

In Exo. 12:12-13, it is written, 12 For I will pass through the land of Egypt this night, and I will smite all the firstborn in the land of Egypt, both man and beast, and I will execute judgment against all the gods of Egypt. I am Yahveh. 13 And the blood shall be your sign upon the houses where you are. And when I see the blood, then I will ...


5

They were to eat the lamb roasted over fire because it was quick: the same reason they were to eat it with their cloak tucked into their belt, their sandals on their feet and their staff in their hand. “Eat it in haste; it is the LORD's Passover.” (Exodus 12:11) They did not know exactly when the LORD was going to call them out but they were to be prepared ...


4

It is mostly irrelevant whether the perpetrator of a crime has one eye or two, because Exodus 21:23-25 are referring to monetary penalties, except in the case of murder. Here is the text from Exodus 21:23-25, all three verses of which are important in understanding the answer to your question: 23: אִם אָסוֹן יׅהְיֶה וְנָתַתָּה נֶפֶשׁ תַּחַת נָפֶשׁ 24: ...


4

Since I have given Alan a bit of a hard time, I feel somewhat obligated to provide an answer. :) Context Like all passages, the key to understanding Exodus 32:26-29 is to look at the broader context. In the previous chapters of Exodus, Moses has lead the Israelites out of Egypt through a series of miraculous events. He has now gone up Mount Sinai to get ...


4

Exo 3:14 and 15 has two verbal forms of the same stem (hwh). The answer in 3:14 is explanatory, but in 3:15 it is literal—YHWH is given as the name. Moses asked about the name and the explanatory reply was “אֶהְיֶה אֲשֶׁר אֶהְיֶה” (ʾehyeh ʾăšer ʾehyeh)—I am that I am or I will be what I will be (S. R. Driver considers it idem per idem construction as in Exo ...


4

The Ten commandments were specifically addressed to the Israelites, in Exodus 20:2. The author had no concept, at that time, of them being applied to all of humanity: Exodus 20:2: "I, the LORD, am your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, that place of slavery.


4

Paul does make various allusions to the Book of Exodus, so it is also possible in this case. However, the context of Exodus 34:15 is different to that of 1 Corinthians 10:27 and the message is different. Any allusion to Exodus would have been for the purpose of correcting or redefining the restrictions imposed by the earlier text. In Exodus, Moses is warned ...


4

Although the Hebrew article is frequently used in a manner that is similar to the English definite article, there are certain contexts where this parallel breaks down. One such case when the Hebrew definite may correspond to an English indefinite is summarized by Waltke and O'Connor:1 The article may also mark nouns definite in the imagination, ...


3

It was not uncommon for people in the Bible to go under multiple monikers. Abram was also known as Abrham (Gen 17:5), Sarah was also known as Sarai (Genesis 17:15), Jacob was also known as Israel (Genesis 35:10) and so forth. This simply appears to be another one of those instances. Names in Hebrew culture often had significance and names were often ...


3

Text Exodus 1:6-22 (ESV): 6 Then Joseph died, and all his brothers and all that generation. 7 But the people of Israel were fruitful and increased greatly; they multiplied and grew exceedingly strong, so that the land was filled with them. 8 Now there arose a new king over Egypt, who did not know Joseph. 9 And he said to his people, “Behold, the ...


3

To put this as a purely linguistic question: Hebrew qānē is the same word as Sumerian gin, Akkadian qanū, Ugaritic qn, Greek κάννα, Latin canna, all meaning “reed” or “cane”. Greek κάνναβις, Latin cannabis, English “hemp” is a different word, perhaps ultimately from Sumerian kunibu, all meaning “hemp”. These two words cannot very well be connected.


3

I believe there is a reason for distinct words in Scripture, even when possibly synonymous, just as we use nearly synonymous words to give subtly to ideas. NOTE: I hold to primarily Mosaic authorship by divine inspiration. Clarification The term "heart" (לֵב, lēḇ) herein refers to Pharaoh's mind, spirit, and will, i.e., the "inner person" per what the ...


3

Exodus 12:12b (and against all the gods of Egypt I will execute judgment: I am the Lord) seems incongruous, both as the only reference anywhere in this narrative to the gods of Egypt and as breaking the flow of narrative. Reading Exodus 12:12a then 12:13, we can see a unity of text and a logical sequence in the narrative: Exodus 12:12a,13 (KJV): For I ...


3

The lamb was to be roasted with fire not eaten raw or boiled. The lamb was to be proportioned between households so that everything would be eaten: …every man shall take a lamb according to their fathers’ house, a lamb for a household. And if the household is too small for a lamb, then he and his nearest neighbor shall take according to the number of ...


2

"In vain", I believe, maps pretty well to "without due reverence" as can be seen in other examples: Psa_139:20 For they speak against thee wickedly, and thine enemies take thy name in vain. Pro_30:9 Lest I be full, and deny thee, and say, Who is the LORD? or lest I be poor, and steal, and take the name of my God in vain. It is parallel to ...


2

tl;dr There is no basis for "bride" in the original Hebrew. The Hebrew text of Exodus 11:1b is: כְּשַׁ֨לְּח֔וֹ כָּלָ֕ה גָּרֵ֛שׁ יְגָרֵ֥שׁ אֶתְכֶ֖ם מִזֶּֽה׃ (Westminster Leningrad Codex) The word which is translated by REB as "bride" is the word "כָּלָה". The word "כָּלָה" (vocalized here with a qamatz below the kaph and no dagesh in the lamedh) means ...


2

While the Bible does not proscribe how execution by stoning should be carried out in detail, later Jewish tradition does and may reflect how stoning was performed during Second Temple Judaism or earlier. The Jewish Encyclopedia summarizes the procedure: The convict having been placed on a platform twice his height, one of the witnesses throws him to ...


2

It is very odd that Moses would ask in Exodus 3:14, “If I go to the Israelites and tell them, ‘The God of your fathers has sent me to you,’ and they ask me, ‘What is his name?’—what should I say to them?” Considering that Moses probably knew which God he was speaking to based on the previous statements in the exchange in verse 6 “I am the God ...


2

While not stated directly, the Sabbath is evidence that holy ground first occurred during creation. The Sabbath is holy to God's people and it is holy to the LORD: And the LORD spoke to Moses, saying, “Speak also to the children of Israel, saying: ‘Surely My Sabbaths you shall keep, for it is a sign between Me and you throughout your generations, that ...


2

The Hebrew text states, כַּאֲשֶׁר צִוָּה יהוה אֶל מֹשֶׁה וַיַּנִּיחֵהוּ אַהֲרֹן לִפְנֵי הָעֵדֻת לְמִשְׁמָרֶת which is translated as, As Yavheh commanded Moses, so Aaron placed it before/in front of/in the presence of the testimony, to be kept. The preposition לִפְנֵי means "before, in front of, in the presence of." Gesenius, p. 680, wrote, It ...


2

In one way, Ezekiel is not intentionally contradicting Exodus 20 (or the equivalent but possibly earlier Deuteronomy 5:9), but rather drawing a parallel to Deuteronomy 24:16: Deuteronomy 24:16: The fathers shall not be put to death for the children, neither shall the children be put to death for the fathers: every man shall be put to death for his own ...


2

The Idea in Brief The LXX speaks of two outcomes: one regarding the developed fetus and one undeveloped. The Masoretic Text however simply presents the fetuses in the plural, and in this respect there is no amplification or clarification between developed and undeveloped in the Masoretic Text. In summary, if the Masoretic Text carries the original literary ...


2

The complete record of the birth of Moses has been divided into two parts. Details covering the birth are placed first (Exodus 2:1-10); his genealogy is second (Exodus 6:14-25). Each of the two records serves as a type of introduction to the two primary phases of his life. After his birth Moses lived in Pharaoh’s house as the son of Pharaoh’s daughter. After ...


2

The Words chazaq And the LORD said unto Moses, When thou goest to return into Egypt, see that thou do all those wonders before Pharaoh, which I have put in thine hand: but I will harden chazaq his heart, that he shall not let the people go. -- Exodus 4:21 (KJV) chazaq is used when Pharaoh's heart is hardened by means of wonders and miracles. See ...



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