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Contrary to the fairly normative *mis*interpretation in much of Protestantism, all Paul is saying is that if you don't have absolute faith that the act you are about to perform is right, then it is sin to do it. This has zero reference to the idea that everything a non-believer does is a sin even when its morally good. That's not what Paul is talking about ...


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Throughout his work Paul is redefining some metaphysical terms. "Faith" is perhaps one of the best examples of this. It is a key element of his teaching in the book of Romans. He introduces faith in chapter 1:1-17. He picks it up again in 3:21-5:2 then refers back to his expositions on faith throughout the rest of the book. So faith is a key term for Paul ...


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Ah, the ESV's breaking up of the runon sentence I think makes it harder to catch the meaning. Because they disconnected "He listened to Paul speaking" from "And Paul, looking intently at him" with a period, I completely missed that all this happened while Paul was speaking. Until I went to Unbound Bible to look at the Greek, and I also read the ASV. ...


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It seems unlikely the daughters would willingly leave their betrothed behind or that the sons-in-law would easily let them go without them. Further, it would make it more likely the daughters would have been the ones looking back.


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Consider the statement "let God be true and every man a liar" (Romans 3:4). This is not saying God should be true, but a fact. In the same sense, let him be accursed is not referring to the church cursing someone, but a statement of fact. Consider also Romans 9:3 "I could wish myself accursed." Accursed is to be under judgment of God and would not ...


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Since adultery is specifically used, the context must refer to either the man, the woman or both being married. Lust referring an unlawful desire, it is unlawful for a married man to desire another woman or an unmarried man to desire a married woman. Such looking in order to cherish an unlawful desire is committing adultery in the heart.


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Not Sure One Can Give a Dogmatic Answer, But... Scripture does not ever give a total number of Lot's daughters. Indeed, the plural "sons-in-law" does not even need to imply two, so (assuming they were married, not just engaged) it could also be that Lot had more than four daughters, two at home and however many were married. However, BDB states that the ...


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The key word in this passage is קָדֵשׁ, which occurs in the singular and refers to the male (cult) prostitute and/or synecdoche for male (cult) prostitution, and the term in the masculine singular occurs six times in the Hebrew Bible where the context is moral abomination. The triliteral root means to consecrate, and, depending on the context (as well as the ...


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1. Use of the Hebrew word satan The Hebrew word satan means, in a general sense, 'opponent', 'adversary', or 'accuser'. As with any word in any language, satan does not have a one-size-fits-all application. It can mean different things in different contexts. In my answer on this question, I surveyed a few of the Hebrew texts that use the word satan. On one ...



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