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Not Sure One Can Give a Dogmatic Answer, But... Scripture does not ever give a total number of Lot's daughters. Indeed, the plural "sons-in-law" does not even need to imply two, so (assuming they were married, not just engaged) it could also be that Lot had more than four daughters, two at home and however many were married. However, BDB states that the ...


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The key word in this passage is קָדֵשׁ, which occurs in the singular and refers to the male (cult) prostitute and/or synecdoche for male (cult) prostitution, and the term in the masculine singular occurs six times in the Hebrew Bible where the context is moral abomination. The triliteral root means to consecrate, and, depending on the context (as well as the ...


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1. Use of the Hebrew word satan The Hebrew word satan means, in a general sense, 'opponent', 'adversary', or 'accuser'. As with any word in any language, satan does not have a one-size-fits-all application. It can mean different things in different contexts. In my answer on this question, I surveyed a few of the Hebrew texts that use the word satan. On one ...


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Definition of Terms Anagogic Sense: The anagogical sense (Greek: anagoge, "leading"). We can view realities and events in terms of their eternal significance, leading us toward our true homeland: thus the Church on earth is a sign of the heavenly Jerusalem. A medieval couplet summarizes the significance of the four senses: The Letter ...


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The Idea in Brief The New Testament is explicit that women do not hold the "office" of teaching (or pastoring), but they may nonetheless have the "gift" of teaching. In the case of the "office" of deacon, there is no explicit expectation or reference that such people need teach the Word of God (as is otherwise the case with the overseer in the same ...


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The following summary is inductive, which takes specific points from the epistle to the Corinthians (and Galatians), and then arrives to the following general summary as probable, but not certain. The these things refer to the divisions among the Corinthians. That is, Paul was using himself and Apollos as the figureheads of these schisms, when in fact the ...


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Paul had just described himself and Apollos as farmers (3:6), builders (3:10), servants and stewards (4:1). It seems likely in following Paul's flow of thought that these are the "things" he refers back to in 4:6. Now these things, brethren, I have figuratively applied to myself and Apollos . . . (NASB)


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I would say 1. And explain it with the following: Blessed are they which do hunger and thirst after righteousness: for they shall be filled. Matthew 5:6 Jesus is setting standards that would be impossible to meet without the Holy Spirit. But he is promising that those who strongly desire righteousness will be filled with righteousness. Paul describes ...



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