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The Greek word behind remorse/repent is μεταμεληθεὶς, pronounced metameletheis, coming from metamelomai. It is found six times in the New Testament: Matthew 21:29, 32; 27:3; 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice); and Hebrews 7:21 (quoting from Psalm 110:4 where it translates the Hebrew nacham). It is uniformly translated as "repent" in the KJV. While some may say that ...


3

When the book of Ezekiel opens, the first two units (chapters 1-7 and 8-11) consist of back-to-back visions of God's throne-chariot, carried by the cherubim. In chapter 1, Ezekiel takes his time describing the cherubim, but when his account moves to the throne itself, he becomes vague and sketchy: And above the dome over their heads there was something ...


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Abraham, at Gen. 22: 16-17 is promised that his descendants would be blessed with an "exceeding multiplication of his seed like the stars of the heaven and the sand upon the seashore." Previously, at Gen. 13:16, God promised Abraham that his posterity would be as numerous "as the dust of the earth." Rabbi Mendel Weinbach writes about this: "Sand, dust ...


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As far as I know, the only other place in the Old Testament where this same Hebrew term ("desire for you") is used, is in the next chapter, when God speaks to Cain. "If you do well, will you not be accepted? And if you do not do well, sin is crouching at the door. Its desire is for you, but you must rule over it.” (Genesis 4:7, ESV) In the literary ...


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This is clear use of hyperbole. Jesus makes use of similar hyperbole in the sermon on the mount (Matthew 5:21-48) in which he instructs us to cut out our eyes if we even look lustfully at a woman or cut off our hand if we stumble. He doesn't mean this literally, but is using hyperbole to emphasize his point. Likewise, here we have an over-emphasis to drive ...



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