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The Greek word behind remorse/repent is μεταμεληθεὶς, pronounced metameletheis, coming from metamelomai. It is found six times in the New Testament: Matthew 21:29, 32; 27:3; 2 Corinthians 7:8 (twice); and Hebrews 7:21 (quoting from Psalm 110:4 where it translates the Hebrew nacham). It is uniformly translated as "repent" in the KJV. While some may say that ...


3

When the book of Ezekiel opens, the first two units (chapters 1-7 and 8-11) consist of back-to-back visions of God's throne-chariot, carried by the cherubim. In chapter 1, Ezekiel takes his time describing the cherubim, but when his account moves to the throne itself, he becomes vague and sketchy: And above the dome over their heads there was something ...


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Abraham, at Gen. 22: 16-17 is promised that his descendants would be blessed with an "exceeding multiplication of his seed like the stars of the heaven and the sand upon the seashore." Previously, at Gen. 13:16, God promised Abraham that his posterity would be as numerous "as the dust of the earth." Rabbi Mendel Weinbach writes about this: "Sand, dust ...


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This is clear use of hyperbole. Jesus makes use of similar hyperbole in the sermon on the mount (Matthew 5:21-48) in which he instructs us to cut out our eyes if we even look lustfully at a woman or cut off our hand if we stumble. He doesn't mean this literally, but is using hyperbole to emphasize his point. Likewise, here we have an over-emphasis to drive ...


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The genealogies of the New Testament should be read not for length of peoples' ages - these may very well be inaccurate - but instead for the honor claim that they make. This is also part of a literary device used to divide the structure of Genesis called the toldot formula into 7 parts. Radiometric dating indicates that modern mankind has lived for many ...



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