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11

This answer draws on Michael J. Cahill, "Drinking Blood at a Kosher Eucharist? The Sound of Scholarly Silence", Biblical Theology Bulletin 32/4 (2002): 168-181. It should be consulted directly for full discussion and copious further references. OP: Wouldn't Jews be taken aback by the suggestion that they should drink blood? Yes, they would. OP: How ...


11

The other two answers do a good job of answering the question, but I thought it was worth pointing out the actual ban and its explanation: Leviticus 17:10 Explicitly makes your point for you; those who consume the blood of animals are cut off from the Jews, but then verse 11 explains the reason for the ban on blood of animals; drinking blood takes upon ...


10

It's hard to imagine that anyone familiar with Christian practice could read the words in 52-58 especially and not think of the Lord's Supper. That said, it seems best to understand this passage not as primarily referring to the sacrament itself, but as primarily referring to that to which the Eucharist also points. In support of this view, Carson in his ...


7

To answer the question, we must first determine what genre the gospel of John actually is. Unlike the synoptic gospels, John doesn't seem overly concerned with chronology. It doesn't seem be a Greek-style biography or history. Instead, commentators often speculate John to be a series of discourses or a thematically-arraigned work compiled over many years. ...


6

Jesus had aleady shocked his followers with references to drinking blood in John Chapter 6. "For My flesh is true food, and My blood is true drink" When leads to.. As a result of this many of His disciples withdrew and were not walking with Him anymore. I think we can infer that by the time of the Last Supper, any disciples who had a problem with ...


5

In addition to the helpful answers already here, I'd add the following. The generally excellent exegete Calvin agrees with your charge of anachronism: "it would have been foolish and unreasonable [for Jesus] to discourse about the Lord’s Supper, before he had instituted it. It is certain, then, that he now speaks of the perpetual and ordinary manner of ...


3

Argument from Passover The Last Supper was the Passover meal, which required the eating of unleavened bread: Luke 22:7,8 (ESV) Then came the day of Unleavened Bread, on which the Passover lamb had to be sacrificed. So Jesus sent Peter and John, saying, “Go and prepare the Passover for us, that we may eat it.” Exodus 12 and 13 prescribe a week of ...


2

The context of 1 Cor 11:29 in the Greek does not refer to the body of Christ in general (now comprised of all believers), but to the individual physiological body of the believer in particular. Bruce M. Metzger, on page 496 of the Second Edition of his very able and critically-panned Textual Commentary on the Greek New Testament (Stuttgart: Deutsche ...


2

It's unclear what Jesus' intention was, and although the textual parallel in those two passages is undeniable: Lk 22:17 λαβὼν ἄρτον εὐχαριστήσας ἔκλασεν καὶ ἔδωκεν αὐτοῖς Lk 24:30 λαβὼν τὸν ἄρτον εὐλόγησεν καὶ κλάσας ἐπεδίδου αὐτοῖς ...plenty of other events have nearly the same construction: Mt ...


1

This is a good question, and touches on a number of hermeneutical nuances. In order to bring out some of the subtleties which will underlie our answer, I'd like to begin by reviewing a number of key assumptions inherent in the question itself. Assumption 1: The disciples were Jews It is true that the disciples were of Israelite descent and had grown up ...


1

Yes, there is likely an allusion here. I had trouble finding many commentators who discuss even the possibility of an allusion. In fact, the sole mention I could find came from Luke Timothy Johnson's volume on Luke in the Sacra Pagina series. Almost in passing he writes: The phrase echoes the biblical language used of Adam and Eve in Gen 3:7, "the eyes ...


1

Most commentaries seem to conclude that it at least it was indicative of the Last Supper, if not a re-enactment of it. I tend to agree with Darrel Bock(if I understand him correctly), that this was not a re-enactment of the Last Supper: The Last Supper(what we tend to look at as the institution of the Lord's Table) was in fact the Passover.(Luke 22:11) ...


1

The broader context to these verses is that when they came together as a church they treated the Lord’s Supper as a common matter, like a regular meal. Not only so but in so doing, they treated it as a party where they ignored the poor, injuring them by their actions. There were ‘divisions’ among them v18. Some of them went ahead with ‘private suppers’. As a ...


1

26 For as often as ye eat this bread, and drink this cup, ye do shew the Lord’s death till he come. 27 Wherefore whosoever shall eat this bread, and drink this cup of the Lord, unworthily, shall be guilty of the body and blood of the Lord. 28 But let a man examine himself, and so let him eat of that bread, and drink of that cup. ...



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