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10

This is just to add to Mike's answer, not to replace it. Joshua does not transliterate into Greek exactly. There are letters in Hebrew that are simply not there in Greek. The Greek of Luke 3:29, Acts 7:45 and Hebrews 4:8 all have Ἰησοῦ/s for Joshua. Translators render it as Joshua instead of Jesus because that is the name readers will be familiar with. ...


10

In Hebrew the name Joshua is: יְהוֹשׁוּעַ Yehoshua or יְהוֹשֻׁעַ Yehoshua “the LORD is salvation.” In Greek it is the transliteration of the Hebrew: Ιησους (Iēsous, sounds like ee-ay-soos). Therefore in the Greek New Testament Jesus and Joshua are both Iēsous. Up until now the names are the same and even in the Latin Vulgate they remained the same. In ...


6

I'm not sure this is a answer, certainly if it is, it is speculative. However, it isn't clear why "ash heap" is an option here, because the word clearly derives from the word for fruitfulness. But as we know, words are a lot more than their etymology. They are a network of associations tying together different ideas based on the context in which they are ...


4

I know that the other answers explain this in more depth, but the simple answer is really that the early Christians read the Greek Septuagint (LXX), and this translation of the Hebrew Tanakh and apocryphal works rendered יֵשׁוּעַ / יְהוֹשֻׁעַ as Ἰησοῦς. From there it was transliterated into Latin (Iesus) and became the name associated with the Christian ...


2

I looked up אפר in BDB, which led to three references in torah (and more in the rest of tanakh that I didn't chase): וַיַּעַן אַבְרָהָם, וַיֹּאמַר: הִנֵּה-נָא הוֹאַלְתִּי לְדַבֵּר אֶל-אֲדֹנָי, וְאָנֹכִי עָפָר וָאֵפֶר. And Abraham answered and said: 'Behold now, I have taken upon me to speak unto the LORD, who am but dust and ashes. (Gen 18:27) ...


2

Pardon me for inserting my less than scholarly conjectures. Due to the Hebrew words for Ash אפר Fruit פרי In my own words Ash as an adjectival descriptor אפרי = Stuff that has been made to be, appear to be like, ash. Frequently, in languages including English and Hebrew, we use the adjectival or participle descriptor with an implied object. And then ...


1

Both fruit and ash come from the two-letter sub-root פֶר . Sub-roots are not words, though some are occasionally used as such. They are primarily metaphoric concepts which are narrowed by the intersecting ideas of the letters which are added to them. פֶר means young bull. As such it is the metaphor of the young bull. It is viril (fruitful) and it is the ...



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