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9

It appears to refer to a hug in which the hugger buries his face in the neck of the huggee. Another use of this is in Gen 33:4: וַיָּרָץ עֵשָׂו לִקְרָאתוֹ וַיְחַבְּקֵהוּ, וַיִּפֹּל עַל-צַוָּארָו וַיִּשָּׁקֵהוּ; וַיִּבְכּוּ. And Esau ran to meet him, and embraced him, and fell on his neck, and kissed him; and they wept. A rabbinic midrash from ...


7

I do not pretend to know the minds of the ESV revisers. But there is some justification for their rendering of Genesis 2:16, although exploring the (possible) reasoning cannot be done briefly. Here we go... Genesis 2:16-17 We need the text, and in this case it is imperative to work from the Hebrew, with the immediate context also in view (I'll stick with ...


7

My translation from the beginning of 13: 1When Ephraim speaks they tremble, For he's a prince in Israel, [reading nasi instead of nasa] But he's guilty of Baal worship, he's dead. 2And now they continue to sin, they made an image from silver, to fit their own idolatrous ideas, the whole thing is a work of craftsmen, of them it is said, ...


6

The verse: וַיֹּאמֶר יְהוָה, לֹא-יָדוֹן רוּחִי בָאָדָם לְעֹלָם, בְּשַׁגַּם, הוּא בָשָׂר; וְהָיוּ יָמָיו, מֵאָה וְעֶשְׂרִים שָׁנָה. The word translated "abide in" is יָדוֹן . The root dalet-vav-nun concerns judgment or discussion, according to 501 Hebrew Verbs. This use is passive. I think the translator means "abide (in)" in the sense of "I can't ...


6

The complete list from the OT: Gen 33:4 Gen 45:14 Gen 46:29 The expression is not found in Hebrew outside the OT (and indeed only in Gen.) and is not used in modern Hebrew except when intent is mock Biblical.


6

"Born" is usually a conjugation of the verb ילד. However, in Hebrew, different words can have an overlap in meaning, and this appears to be the case with יחם. While יחם simply means "to be hot" (cp. Eze. 24:11), it may also be used idiomatically in the realm of sexuality, meaning "to be aroused." This phenomenon is not unlike that which occurs in many other ...


5

I cannot explain why two different translators would come up with different meanings except to say they had different agendas. One agenda, I'm afraid, is the concept that sex is dirty or wrong, and the second is the Christian concept of "original sin." Neither of these is accepted in a Jewish reading of the Hebrew. With JPS translation, it is as follows: ...


5

No, the prophet is not teaching that the Israelites are in sin because they are drinking wine. The picture is not one where everyone is sitting down to a nice meal together and giving thanks to God, but God is angry because they had a little wine. The picture is not temperance, but intemperance (esp. 4:18). It is a picture of the Israelites engaged in ...


4

The JPS translation is clearest here, as pointed out in the comments, so I’ll use it to illustrate my answer: “There are friends that one hath to his own hurt; but there is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother.” The original Hebrew is indispensable here: “אִישׁ רֵעִים, לְהִתְרֹעֵעַ; וְיֵשׁ אֹהֵב, דָּבֵק מֵאָח׃” Ish re‘im l’hithro‘eä‘; v’yesh ’ohev ...


4

Daniel 2:2 is written in Hebrew. In transliteration, the list of professionals that the king calls is: hartumim ashaphim mechashphim casdim The verse is an echo of Genesis 41:8. "Hartumim" appear in the story of the dreams of Pharaoh in Genesis 41:8, in Exodus 7:11 and elsewhere, as dream interpreters and fortune tellers. The word might come from ...


4

The Hebrew of "raisin cakes" is אֲשִׁישֵׁ֥י עֲנָבִֽים Strong's: 809, 6025. The old rendering is "flagons of wine" (KJV). If that interpretation is taken, then he is criticizing their drunkenness, as elsewhere in Hosea. Calvin and Henry both follow the flagon translation. However, this appears to be a mistranslation; the word seems to come from a root ...


4

2. And now, they continue to sin, and they have made for themselves a molten image from their silver according to their pattern, deities, all of it the work of craftsmen; to them say, "Those who sacrifice man may kiss the calves." And now: Jehu’s dynasty, who saw all this, continue to sin. according to their pattern: Heb. ...


3

The verse appears in the Masoretic Text and LXX as follows, respectively - Psalm 19:3 (MT) 3 אֵֽין־אֹמֶר וְאֵין דְּבָרִים בְּלִי נִשְׁמָע קֹולָֽם׃ The literal translation - There is no speech and there are no words: their voice is not heard. Psalm 19:1-3 (LXX) 3 οὐκ εἰσὶν λαλιαὶ οὐδὲ λόγοι ὧν οὐχὶ ἀκούονται αἱ φωναὶ αὐτῶν ...


3

The Hebrew for that part of the verse is: כִּי מַה-טּוּבוֹ, וּמַה-יָּפְיוֹ The words "tov" (good/goodness) and "yafi" (beauty) have the suffix "וֹ", which is third-person singular masculine. This suggests that the goodness and beauty being talked about belong to God (but see below for another idea), and not to some unnamed "they". A more literal ...


3

In the English the infinitive here serves as the content of a purpose clause. It's hard to extract temporal aspect from infinitives without context, which appears to indicate that Satan did not have this opportunity. לְשִׂטְנֹֽו in verse looks to be a Hiphil (purpose) stem of the sin-tet-nun root. The lamed prefix reinforces this since it indicates ...


3

Allepo Codex and Masoretic, Hos 4:10: Achlu v'lo yisbau / They ate and were not satisfied hiznu v'lo yiphrotsu / They whored but did not multiply ci et YHWH azavu lishmor / because YHWH they abandoned to keep (follow) Hos 4:11 Znut v'yayyin v'tirosh / Whoring and wine and fresh wine yikach lev / will take away the heart (attention or understanding) ...


3

The link to Strong H809 in Kazark's answer brings three other references: II Sam 6:19 I Chron 16:3 Song 5:2 In addition see Isaiah 16:7. None of the contexts gives a clearer idea of what "ashishim" are. Different words but similar general imagery to Hosea 3:1 in Amos 6:6 provided a basis for some commentators. "anavim" are grapes, but in this context ...


2

This is more an expanded comment on Eli's answer than an answer in itself. Eli wrote: The intention of the list is to cover all of the possible wisdom professions and to show that none of them can compete with the word of God as given to Daniel. This is an astute observation when taking into account the style of the whole book. Long lists occur in many ...


2

This is only a small addition to previous answers, which have dealt well with the main issue. Act 20:37 And they all wept sore, and fell on Paul's neck, and kissed him The idiom is not restricted to Hebrew: Here a Gentile author is writing about a group of predominantly Gentiles saying goodbye to the apostle to the Gentiles. It is possible that Luke ...


2

Proverbs 18:24 KJV: A man that hath friends must show himself friendly: and there is a friend that sticketh closer than a brother. NIV/ESV: A man of many companions may come to ruin, but there is a friend who sticks closer than a brother. There is another possible way to view the Hebrew here in that the key Hithpael-stem verb may mean "broken" in an ...


2

This is a case of ambiguity in the translation, as some of the explanatory words like "where" or "which" are not present in the Hebrew. Unfortunately it is very hard to put into English without making a judgment about the details. See http://biblehub.com/interlinear/psalms/19-3.htm to read an interlinear text and http://biblehub.com/psalms/19-3.htm to see a ...


2

The Septuagint gives: ... en anomiais synelempsthen kai en hamartiais ekkisesen me he meter mou ... amidst lawlessness I was conceived and in erroneous expectations my mother longed with burning for me It is not very likely that David intended to blame his mother for his own fault. With more probability he admitted the shame of one who was hoped for in ...


1

Even if this "surely" in Genesis 2:16 were meant to imply predestination (which does not seem likely), it does not refer to eating from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, but to eating from all the other allowed trees. 16 And the Lord God commanded the man, saying, “You may surely eat of every tree of the garden, So this verse is not about the ...


1

According to the footnote in the NET Bible, the word used here is יָדוֹן (yadon), which only occurs here. Apparently, it might be derived from the word "strive" (din), but then it should have been יָדִין (yadin). The LXX translates it "remain with", which might be the real meaning of יָדוֹן (yadon). See footnote 5 at ...



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