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8

I understand you may be looking for an exegesis that fits within your existing view ('that 90% of the Book of Revelations is yet to be fulfilled'). However, I will be offering a more grammatical-historical approach. The Roman Empire destroyed Jerusalem and its temple in 70 AD, an event Jews quickly began comparing to the destruction of Jerusalem and its ...


7

I do not believe that the explanation, "God has made a new type of gold" is sufficient. Firstly, we know that John is able to identify the material as gold, and such an identification could hardly be made if the material were transparent. Secondly, while we might think of gold as the element Au with the atomic number 79, that was not the definition of gold ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


4

The parables’ interpretation hinges on the identity of Jesus’ brothers. While it is true that at least some of these “brothers” are in need, their need does not define them. The need simply identifies them as the “least.” Jesus, in Matthew 12:48, has already made known the identity of his “brothers.” Who are my mother and my brothers?” Then pointing ...


4

Contextually, Isaiah 49 is describing the return of Jacob/Israel from exile. Verse 49.5: 'And now YHWH says ... to bring Jacob back to him, that Israel might be gathered to him' This includes the rebuilding of the city Jerusalem/Zion. Beginning in verse 14: But Zion said, 'YHWH has forsaken me, and my Lord has forgotten me.' [YHWH's ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


3

I agree with the previous answer by Joseph and will seek to reiterate it by looking at the immediate context of 1 Thess. 4. In 1 Thess. 4:13 Paul refers to "those who are asleep" and is simply trying to encourage them since it seems that some of them were grieving. They were under the misconception that the dead would not experience the coming of the Lord. ...


2

In the Christian New Testament, there were false teachers who had taught (during the First Century at the time of Paul) that the resurrection had already taken place. 2 Timothy 2:17-18 (NASB) 17 and their talk will spread like gangrene. Among them are Hymenaeus and Philetus, 18 men who have gone astray from the truth saying that the resurrection has ...


2

The Greek verb συστέλλω occurs in 1 Cor 7:29 and in only one other verse of the New Testament. Acts 5:5-6 (NASB) 5 And as he heard these words, Ananias fell down and breathed his last; and great fear came over all who heard of it. 6 The young men got up and covered him up, and after carrying him out, they buried him. The verb means "to wrap up." The ...


2

The Greek text states, ὃν δεῖ οὐρανὸν μὲν δέξασθαι ἄχρι χρόνων ἀποκαταστάσεως πάντων ὧν ἐλάλησεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ στόματος πάντων, ἁγίων αὐτοῦ προφητῶν ἀπ᾽ αἰῶνος which I translate as, whom Heaven must receive until the times of the ἀποκατάστασις of all things, which God spoke by the mouth of all His holy prophets from the most ancient time. I did not ...


2

Babylon's "sorcery" is simply referring to her decptive, enchanting powers mentioned earlier in the chapter. The merchants, similar to the kings that "committed fornication with her", were enticed by her luxuries (see verse 3). To interpret this whole chapter more broadly, I believe that Babylon refers both literally to Rome and figuratively to the ...


1

The "Times of Restitution" must be understood in context with Peter's speech, and not made a separate clause, confirming or denying God's status with Israel. The Greek word for “Restitution"(Restoration)in Acts 3:21 is ἀποκαταστάσεως, which is a noun form and is related to the verb form apokathistáneis (ἀποκαθιστάνεις), which is “restore” in Acts ...


1

The context of the rebellion of II Thessalonians chapter two is much debated. I will attempt to provide a solid biblical based answer. The context of II Thessalonians 2:3 is the Second Coming of Christ. I'd like to briefly make mention of two different Bible versions, and their rendering of verse two of this chapter. I'd also like to explain why I feel the ...



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