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15

According to the notes on the NET Bible: This is one of the hardest verses in the gospels to interpret. Various views exist for what generation means. (1) Some take it as meaning “race” and thus as an assurance that the Jewish race (nation) will not pass away. But it is very questionable that the Greek term γενεά (genea) can have this meaning. Two other ...


8

I understand you may be looking for an exegesis that fits within your existing view ('that 90% of the Book of Revelations is yet to be fulfilled'). However, I will be offering a more grammatical-historical approach. The Roman Empire destroyed Jerusalem and its temple in 70 AD, an event Jews quickly began comparing to the destruction of Jerusalem and its ...


8

The OP asked: "What is the exact meaning of this verse?" In the TR and BMT/GMT texts, Matt. 25:13 reads: γρηγορειτε ουν οτι ουκ οιδατε την ημεραν ουδε την ωραν εν η ο υιος του ανθρωπου ερχεται A better rendering from the Greek into English might be: "Be accordingly vigilant because no man knows the day or time when the son of man comes." ...


8

One of my favorite sayings in hermeneutics is: The meaning of a word is determined by the context in which it is used. As you indicated in your question, there are many "women" mentioned in the Bible, so to determine which "woman" is being referenced here, we need to look at the context. As we proceed, keep in mind that this is "a great sign in ...


7

I do not believe that the explanation, "God has made a new type of gold" is sufficient. Firstly, we know that John is able to identify the material as gold, and such an identification could hardly be made if the material were transparent. Secondly, while we might think of gold as the element Au with the atomic number 79, that was not the definition of gold ...


7

All the major witnesses support the reading ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης. This translates into English as "(out) of/ from the great tribulation." The article, in bold face, is present, so the phrase must include the definite article in the English translation. There are some exceptions to translating the Greek definite article into English (e.g., before proper ...


6

@H3br3wHamm3r81 has a good answer and I do not intend to replace, but to supplement his answer. οὗτοί εἰσιν οἱ ἐρχόμενοι ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης Lit. "These are the ones coming out of the tribulation, the great one." ἐκ τῆς θλίψεως τῆς μεγάλης is a prepositional phrase (preposition->article->noun->article->adjective) that modifies "the ones coming ...


6

Is Matthew 5.5 in the same line of thought? To start, we should double check that Matthew 5.5 is relevant to interpreting any texts from the Hebrew scriptures ('Old Testament'). We want to be careful not to group it with those texts if they're not even using the same language. A simple way to verify this is to compare Matthew 5.5 with the Greek translation ...


5

Eschatology makes hypocrites of us all. The most figurative book in the Bible is interpreted literally, and literal texts are interpreted figuratively to meet our preconceived expectations, making a secondary issue into one of the most incendiary. Using methods of sensus plenior: Matthew writes in a Hebrew form similar to poetry, but has nothing to do with ...


5

A Generation is 40 years in Bible. Here are some examples. Numbers 32:13 (ESV) - And the Lord's anger was kindled against Israel, and he made them wander in the wilderness forty years, until all the generation that had done evil in the sight of the Lord was gone. Deuteronomy 1:34-36 (ESV) - And the Lord heard your words and was angered, and he swore, ‘Not ...


5

The next verse is: And it shall be, that whoso of the families of the earth goeth not up unto Jerusalem to worship the King, the LORD of hosts, upon them there shall be no rain. Sukkot (Tabernacles) is the beginning of the rainy season in the land of Israel. This suggests a direct causal connection: no worship at Sukkot, no rain that winter. No ...


5

First we must lay out two basic interpretive principles. Then I will list the meaning of the 144,000 (Revelation 7:4-8; 14:1-5) for each of the four main Christian interpretive approaches to the book of Revelation. Interpretive Principles First we must decide if the 144,000 mentioned in Revelation 7:4-8 are the same as those in 14:1-5, or if they refer to ...


5

I don't know enough Greek to say definitively one way or the other, but the idea that those who are "taken" are like those who were "swept away" makes more sense than the opposite. It may also be relevant that in the parable of the wheat and the weeds, (Matthew 13:24-30), the weeds sown by an enemy are the first to be "taken" at harvest time. He put ...


4

Contextually, Isaiah 49 is describing the return of Jacob/Israel from exile. Verse 49.5: 'And now YHWH says ... to bring Jacob back to him, that Israel might be gathered to him' This includes the rebuilding of the city Jerusalem/Zion. Beginning in verse 14: But Zion said, 'YHWH has forsaken me, and my Lord has forgotten me.' [YHWH's ...


4

The parables’ interpretation hinges on the identity of Jesus’ brothers. While it is true that at least some of these “brothers” are in need, their need does not define them. The need simply identifies them as the “least.” Jesus, in Matthew 12:48, has already made known the identity of his “brothers.” Who are my mother and my brothers?” Then pointing ...


4

I don't think so. The return of Christ can't be reasonably connected to Rosh Hashanah because the shofar was blown on many other occasions as well, including war. Besides, it is more likely that the trumpets your mention would be understood by ancient Jews as the 'silver trumpets' blown daily by the priests in the temple. We can't tell in the Greek which ...


4

First, the word translated transparent is diaphanes and its used just once in the New Testament: here. It's a compound of dia ("through") and phaino ("shine"). If it's a bad translation, it's also a common one. From what I see, the only two English words translators use are "transparent" and "clear". Only the Aramaic Bible in Plain English avoids the ...


4

While Matthew 5:5 echoes Psalm 37:11, it's not obvious that they have the same horizons, so I will take them one at a time and then offer a summary. Psalm 37:11 A canonical reading of Psalm 37:11 places the verse in the context of a number of Psalms about David (essentially 3-41). Psalm 37 itself is marked as "Of David" indicating that the primary referent ...


3

First, there is an incongruity between the narrative at the end of 19 and at the start of 20 that should be observed. The visions in 19:11-21 culminate with the death and destruction of the nations. 19:15 - Coming out of his mouth is a sharp sword with which to strike down the nations. 19:17b-18 - Come, gather together for the great supper of God, ...


3

According to Vincent's Word Studies: Temple of God According to some, a figure of the Christian Church. Others, the temple of Jerusalem. Barnes' Notes on the Bible defends the first reading: The phrase "the temple of God" is several times used with reference to the Christian church, 1 Corinthians 3:16, 1 Corinthians 3:17; 2 Corinthians 6:16; ...


3

Definition Let's look at the Greek here: The original word for "this generation" is genea. Strong's concordance for this shows: 1) fathered, birth, nativity 2) that which has been begotten, men of the same stock, a family a) the several ranks of natural descent, the successive members of a genealogy b) metaph. a group of men very like each ...


3

The NET Bible has a helpful comment: There is debate among commentators and scholars over the phrase one will be taken and one left about whether one is taken for judgment or for salvation. If the imagery is patterned after the rescue of Noah from the flood, as some suggest, the ones taken are the saved (as Noah was) and those left behind are judged. The ...


3

I think Jack Douglas did a good job of giving the appropriate options available for that passage. I don't think any preterist argument really does a good enough job handling the rest of the Text available, especially referring to the Rapture. Anyways, Jack said this: (3) generation may refer to “the generation that sees the signs of the end” (vv. ...


3

I agree with the previous answer by Joseph and will seek to reiterate it by looking at the immediate context of 1 Thess. 4. In 1 Thess. 4:13 Paul refers to "those who are asleep" and is simply trying to encourage them since it seems that some of them were grieving. They were under the misconception that the dead would not experience the coming of the Lord. ...


2

Paul's warning about "the last days" would be strange if he were merely describing the normal brokenness that has been common to man since the dawn of time. (Such brokenness would not be news to anyone, and would not be specific to "the last days.") He seems to be anticipating something unusual. ...And yet, the characteristics he is describing have been ...


2

I take the 144,000 to be certainly a symbolic number. A perfect amount of 12,000 people from anything, and that twelves times over, can't under any rational system be literally 144,000 people regardless of the prophetic situation, current, past or future. The question then is what does it mean as a symbol surrounding the Lord? Naturally the twelve tribes ...


2

Well sorda. Act 1:6 When they therefore were come together, they asked of him, saying, Lord, wilt thou at this time restore again the kingdom to Israel? Act 1:7 And he said unto them, It is not for you to know the times or the seasons, which the Father hath put in his own power. 2Ti 3:1 This know also, that in the last days perilous times ...


2

The sheep and "the least of these my brothers" are mutually-defining. The kingdom of Jesus is a kingdom of koinonia, partnership. Just as Yahweh self-identifies with Abram his covenant partner in Gen 12:3 ("I will bless those who bless you, and those who curse you, I will curse"), Jesus says the same here regarding those in the kingdom. They are his ...


2

Babylon's "sorcery" is simply referring to her decptive, enchanting powers mentioned earlier in the chapter. The merchants, similar to the kings that "committed fornication with her", were enticed by her luxuries (see verse 3). To interpret this whole chapter more broadly, I believe that Babylon refers both literally to Rome and figuratively to the ...


2

The Greek text states, ὃν δεῖ οὐρανὸν μὲν δέξασθαι ἄχρι χρόνων ἀποκαταστάσεως πάντων ὧν ἐλάλησεν ὁ θεὸς διὰ στόματος πάντων, ἁγίων αὐτοῦ προφητῶν ἀπ᾽ αἰῶνος which I translate as, whom Heaven must receive until the times of the ἀποκατάστασις of all things, which God spoke by the mouth of all His holy prophets from the most ancient time. I did not ...



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