Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

OLD TESTAMENT USAGE: The word "poiema" us used only twice in the New Testament, as you say. But in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the same word is used several times: 1Sam. 8:8 According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt, even to this day—with which they have forsaken Me and served other ...


5

Update: I've left my original two opening paragraphs here (slightly modified for contextual clarity) because I still believe in general they are true when it comes to resolving highly disputed variants in the text. Often the reason they are highly disputed is because the extant textual witness cannot answer which variation is correct in a straightforward ...


4

There are four instances of the Present Imperative (Second Person Plural) in the Epistle to the Ephesians where there is ambiguity between the middle and passive voice, because the literal grammatical verb form is identical. (Please click here for more examples in the New Testament.) In the Epistle to the Ephesians, every single one of these four verbs is in ...


3

All people are descendants of Adam (Acts 17:26). When Adam disobeyed the Lord, he lost access to the tree of life, which would have enabled him to have lived an indefinite mortal life (Gen 3:22-23). This broken access from the presence of the Lord resulted in the eventual physical death of Adam (Gen 5:5). All descendants of Adam therefore live imperfect, ...


3

Household codes were common in Greco-Roman culture, going back to at least Artistotle in his book Politics. In these Greco-Roman household codes, the father has an effectively absolute rule over his household (which includes his wife, children, and slaves), and in comparison to the household codes from the New Testament, they are definitely much harsher in ...


3

Examining the Text The Greek text gives a fairly clear clue as to what is being referred to (its just one's theology that tends to get in the way of seeing it). There is a textual variant here, but it is not relevant to the discussion. The variant is found in the majority text and will be noted here by asterisks, like so: τῆς. Since the article follows a ...


3

The mystery is Christ and our mystical union to him. Hodge pretty much answers the question as simply as possible: Τὸ μυστήριον τοῦτο μεγα ἐστίν, this mystery is great. The word mystery does not refer to the passage in Gen. 2:24, as though the apostle intended to say that that passage had a mystical sense which he had just unfolded by applying it to ...


2

A "correct" interpretation depends in large part on one's assumptions (or presuppositions). A covenant theologian might presuppose the Church (i.e., the "holy Catholic--or universal--and apostolic church" began in Abraham's tent, whereas a theologian of a different stripe might presuppose the Church was yet future, as Christ seems to indicate in Matthew ...


2

Looking only at verse 32, it is pretty clear that the profound mystery involves Christ and his relationship with the church. However, looking at the broader passage (probably around 5:21-33) demonstrates that Paul is talking about more. This portion of Ephesians is one of the key passages on marriage relationships, and it is here that Paul explains the ...


2

ΤΟΜΥΣΤΗΡΙΟΝΤΟΥΤΟΜΕΓΑΕΣΤΙΝ (P46, ca. 175-225 CE, et al.) "But I am speaking," says [Paul], "of Christ and the Church." (Tertullian, Against Marcion, V-847, ca. 175-222 CE) Paul has referred to the conjunctions within the Pleroma ... when writing of the conjugal union ... thus: "This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the ...


1

Brother Jospeh has given a great answer to your first question, so I wanted to address the second one: "Speaking in psalms, singing in hearts, giving thanks, submitting one another. Are these behaviors the result of being filled in the Spirit or are they ways to fill yourself in the Spirit?" In Greek, these are present active participles that are acting ...


1

1) Since the verb "πληρόω" is transitive, there won't be any wordform distinction between present middle and passive, and only the context can guide you. So of course there are two interpretations: the passive is favored by those who believe God fills people with (the) Spirit and the middle is favored by those who believe people fill themselves with spirit. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible