Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

7

OLD TESTAMENT USAGE: The word "poiema" us used only twice in the New Testament, as you say. But in the Greek translation of the Old Testament, the same word is used several times: 1Sam. 8:8 According to all the works which they have done since the day that I brought them up out of Egypt, even to this day—with which they have forsaken Me and served other ...


5

Marriage isn't 50-50. It's both parties giving 100%. Dr. Emerson Eggerichs addresses the differences in the commands extensively in his book Love and Respect and on his website, most recently in a September 4 blogpost. This verse doesn't mean that women don't have to love and men don't have to be subject to their wives. Paul was giving instructions about ...


5

Update: I've left my original two opening paragraphs here (slightly modified for contextual clarity) because I still believe in general they are true when it comes to resolving highly disputed variants in the text. Often the reason they are highly disputed is because the extant textual witness cannot answer which variation is correct in a straightforward ...


4

There are four instances of the Present Imperative (Second Person Plural) in the Epistle to the Ephesians where there is ambiguity between the middle and passive voice, because the literal grammatical verb form is identical. (Please click here for more examples in the New Testament.) In the Epistle to the Ephesians, every single one of these four verbs is in ...


3

Another perspective on this issue: why should Paul have counselled "love" in each of the three cases of domestic relationship in Colossians 3:18-20 (wives to husbands, husbands to wives, children to parents)? The question assumes that this disposition -- certainly a norm in modern western nuclear families -- is also the default social configuration in ...


3

Short Answer: We can be fairly certain this is just saying that before Jesus could go back up to heaven, He first had to go down to the earth, which is lower. The variants There are two major textual variants in this verse listed by the UBS4, and they shed some light on what is going on here. 1) A large number of later sources added "first" so that it ...


3

All people are descendants of Adam (Acts 17:26). When Adam disobeyed the Lord, he lost access to the tree of life, which would have enabled him to have lived an indefinite mortal life (Gen 3:22-23). This broken access from the presence of the Lord resulted in the eventual physical death of Adam (Gen 5:5). All descendants of Adam therefore live imperfect, ...


3

Examining the Text The Greek text gives a fairly clear clue as to what is being referred to (its just one's theology that tends to get in the way of seeing it). There is a textual variant here, but it is not relevant to the discussion. The variant is found in the majority text and will be noted here by asterisks, like so: τῆς. Since the article follows a ...


2

Short Answer: Yes. In verse 12 'ἦτε' is in the imperfect tense, which is "past time" (similar to our "past tense" in English). Paul is describing the state of Gentiles prior to the unification of the two groups in Christ. Thus, it is inaccurate to render this by saying Gentiles have no citizenship and are strangers (present tense), rather it should be ...


1

Prolegomena The question assumes Pauline authorship, a point on which scholars are divided.1 It must be noted that I do not take Paul to be the author of Ephesians—I regard this epistle as pseudonymous. This is important for understanding the approach I will present because it begins with the observation that the author of Ephesians modeled this ...


1

It is sometimes argued by modern American Christians (who are used to having a single "pastor-teacher" figure up in front of their church) that pastors and teachers are the same. However, I would be careful not to think of this as the majority view (or even the majority view amongst scholars.) The interpretive decision to group "pastors and teachers" ...


1

Brother Jospeh has given a great answer to your first question, so I wanted to address the second one: "Speaking in psalms, singing in hearts, giving thanks, submitting one another. Are these behaviors the result of being filled in the Spirit or are they ways to fill yourself in the Spirit?" In Greek, these are present active participles that are acting ...


1

1) Since the verb "πληρόω" is transitive, there won't be any wordform distinction between present middle and passive, and only the context can guide you. So of course there are two interpretations: the passive is favored by those who believe God fills people with (the) Spirit and the middle is favored by those who believe people fill themselves with spirit. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible