Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

The manuscripts that omit "in Ephesus" do not have a blank line. That is actually just a theory at this point with no manuscript evidence as far as I know. The words just run together, as you say. If you want to know what this looks like, you can look at Codex Sinaiticus (4th century) for this. When Sinaiticus was originally copied, it was missing εν εφεσῳ. ...


8

In ancient times a seal or signet was an instrument, often metal or stone, with an engraved pattern or design on it. It would be pressed into a softer material, usually wax or clay leaving an imprint like a stamp. A seal affixed to a document (usually on a scroll) would have to be broken in order to unroll the document and read it. This meant it was in one ...


6

Paul made a direct word-for-word quote not from Psalm 37:8, but from the Septuagint of Psalm 4:4 - ...ὀργίζεσθε καὶ μὴ ἁμαρτάνετε... In the Hebrew of Psalm 4:4, the verb for "anger" is רָגַז which has the connotation of perturbing, or being perturbed. In the 41 instances that this verb occurs in the Hebrew Bible in various conjugations and tenses, the ...


5

Update: I've left my original two opening paragraphs here (slightly modified for contextual clarity) because I still believe in general they are true when it comes to resolving highly disputed variants in the text. Often the reason they are highly disputed is because the extant textual witness cannot answer which variation is correct in a straightforward ...


5

In Romans 3:4 Paul does the same kind of verb change. That is, he modifies the meaning of a verb from the Old Testament while quoting every other word verbatim from the Old Testament verses in question. So to use the example of Romans 3:4 we see that Paul is quoting from Psalm 51:4 saying, "...and prevail when you are judged." But the same verse in the ...


5

Likely polyptoton based on the ancient Hebrew prayer Nishmat that ends "shir ushvaha, hallel v'zimra" translated into Koine, in which case it would not necessarily be appropriate to look for a distinct meaning for each term. Attributed variously to the Apostle Peter and to Shimon ben Shatah, I guess depending on which side of the fence you are on, and ...


5

First I checked that the same phrase appears in both Col 3:16 and Eph 5:19. It does. psalmois, humnois, kai odais pneumatikais I then checked those words out in the lexicons and compared the words they translated in the LXX. psalmois - often for neginah, which means song, or mizmor, also meaning song. Used 92 times in the LXX but mostly in the title ...


4

I believe the Paul is contrasting the similarity of drunkenness with being 'filled with the Spirit' while at the same time contrasting the differences of drunkenness with being 'filled with the Spirit'. For example, the whole context is expressing a thankful, social, warm, loving atmosphere that comes with a 'filling of the Spirit'. This state of spirit has ...


4

τῇ γὰρ χάριτί ἐστε σεσῳσμένοι διὰ πίστεως διὰ is a preposition which is, technically, ad "verbal adjective." Participles usually introduce participial phrases which can serve either adverbially or adjectivally ("Running for your life." vs. "Hair of white.") and, as such, can take on a wide variety of meanings. To further widen the range, they can also ...


3

When one sleeps, it actually appears like the person is a corpse. (When I sleep, I snore, but that is different.) When my children were very, very young and sleeping in the crib, I would actually nudge them to ensure they were not dead, because in sleep the resemblance is almost exactly akin to death (except for those who snore like me). When the Bible ...


3

Charles Hodge, in his commentary on Ephesians gives a very good explanation of the difference in the quotation. Hodge reasons that Paul applies the receiving of gifts in accord with the original idea of a King with plunder. A kind has plunder to give to his kingdom, so he switches the verb while retaining the same image and idea: The divine writers ...


3

Τῇ γὰρ χάριτι ἐστε σεσῳσμένοι διὰ πίστεως· καὶ τοῦτο οὐκ ἐξ ὑμῶν, θεοῦ τὸ δῶρον· Ephesians 2:8 For by Grace you are saved through faith and this is not of yourselves,God's Gift. (This is what the Greek texts says) It's explicit that the Gift is Faith because the demonstrative pronoun THIS( τοῦτο) refes to the immediate antecedent which is FAITH. Also, ...


3

τῇ γὰρ χάριτί ἐστε σεσωσμένοι διὰ τῆς πίστεως· καὶ τοῦτο οὐκ ἐξ ὑμῶν Θεοῦ τὸ δῶρον. There is no "it" in the original greek text. The English translators had to put the word "it" as an idiomatic pronoun to make the sentence in English "complete". Idiomatic use of pronoun "it" is very common in English. For example, It is not in my intention to offend you. ...


3

Household codes were common in Greco-Roman culture, going back to at least Artistotle in his book Politics. In these Greco-Roman household codes, the father has an effectively absolute rule over his household (which includes his wife, children, and slaves), and in comparison to the household codes from the New Testament, they are definitely much harsher in ...


2

A "correct" interpretation depends in large part on one's assumptions (or presuppositions). A covenant theologian might presuppose the Church (i.e., the "holy Catholic--or universal--and apostolic church" began in Abraham's tent, whereas a theologian of a different stripe might presuppose the Church was yet future, as Christ seems to indicate in Matthew ...


2

This is more of a theological question since the text itself doesn't really make this explicit. The English translation you've given is a good rendering of this passage into English. The text is clear that "you have [already] been saved," as it is perfect (completed action), but whether faith was a one-time event or ongoing necessity is not immediately clear ...


2

Note: I have very little understanding of Greek grammar. Please take this answer with a grain of salt. The NET Bible notes on verse 5: By predestining. The aorist participle may be translated either causally (“because he predestined,” “having predestined”) or instrumentally (“by predestining”). A causal nuance would suggest that God’s predestination of ...


2

The assumption in the question is that the Ephesians text does not refer to thought and attitude. For sake of this post, I do not believe that this assumption is correct and is perhaps birthed from to great a focus on the allegory of the text and not enough on the substance. The "armor of God" allegory is used to extend the idea of a battle, though not one ...


2

I take your third option as the best because we are saved, or justified “by grace through faith,” which is how we receive Jesus Christ and his obedience on our behalf. In case we do not get it, the opposing competitor for such salvation is stressed so that it is absolutely clear. Works is not a competitor to grace, or faith, but to justification and ...


2

I would interpret it as follows: "us" and "we" in the whole passage refers to all believers (or specifically Paul and the Ephesians here) - with the exception of the following: v12 "we who were the first to hope in Christ" refers to those early believers (like Paul), of whom it is likely that nearly all were Judean Jews; v13 "you also" refers to the ...


2

As mentioned by @Joseph, Paul is quoting Psalm 4: 4Be angry, and do not sin; ponder in your own hearts on your beds, and be silent. ESV When quoting from the Old Testament, New Testament authors assume the context of the quotation is understood or will be examined1, so we need to look at more of Psalm 4 to understand Paul's meaning. The ESV ...


1

The particular pairings of the three mentioned texts find parallels in Aristotle where he writes, "Now we should begin by examining everything in its fewest possible elements; and the first and fewest possible parts of a family are master and slave, husband and wife, father and children." (Politics I.3) However, these pairings lack any of the ethical ...


1

Short Answer: This particular text does not relate to an individual coming into unity of faith and becoming a perfect man, but rather, to the body of Christ as a whole coming into unity of faith and becoming a perfect man. This will not be complete until all God's chosen have come in, and the completed body perfectly reflects Christ. This growth of the body ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible