Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Read in isolation, 2 Kings 4:38-41 can be understood as a story about a foul tasting soup that Elisha improved by adding a new flavor. However, the context in II Kings is miracles performed by Elisha to save people from death by famine. From within that context it seems that the "death in the pot," was an actual danger that required Elisha's intervention. ...


10

Rabbi Elchanan Samet has a book called Pirkei Elisha about all the Elisha stories in II Kings. In that book, Rabbi Samet is making one basic argument: there isn't a single Elisha story that is intended to show: "Elisha can do magic." Through a careful literary and historical reading of each story, Rabbi Samet tries to show how broad social implications and ...


6

Before anything, though, I must say that no, king Joash would not know that he must strike the ground five or six times. But, he really should have did that. All verse emphasis mine. First of all, we would have to look at the reason why Elisha would be angry at an answer to a seemingly minuscule command, 2 Kings 13:14 (NKJV) 14 Elisha had become ...


4

The phenomenon described in II Kings 3:20-23 is well known in the area. Rain can fall in the higher areas such as Edom (now Jordan) or in the Judean hills while down in the Jordan valley on either side of the river, the sky is clear and sunny. When this happens, the wadis (gulleys) that drain the uplands erupt suddenly in flash floods that endanger ...


3

I'm reasonably certain that 24 oxen is, well, a lot of cow. What can we learn from this? First and foremost, that Elisha's family or clan was well-off. Let's go to an authority. The Anchor Yale Bible, I Kings. Page 455: 19 He found Elisha son of Shaphat; he was plowing. The detail conveys more than local color; Elisha's prosaic background points up ...


3

The word in Hebrew, verse 40, is maveth. It means death, as in pestilence. It is used in the Bible where death and destruction is conveyed as a meaning. It's not talking about bitterness. The message is, the prophet intervenes for these men due to Yahweh's mercy. Ref.: Gesenius's Lexicon of Hebrew and English and my knowledge of Hebrew.


2

A wild gourd is just that. A gourd which grows in the wild. It would be difficult to say which species of gourd it might be though. "There was no more death in the pot" has also been translated "there was no more bitterness in the pot" or "there was no more harm in the pot". Starch, by my understanding, does have the ability to mitigate certain bitterness ...


2

Those were the things which Elisha refused. Gehazi's acceptance was unacceptable in the frame of Elisha's refusal. So Elisha catalogs the types of gifts that he refused in order to emphasize his role as a mere channel of the divinity as opposed to miracle-worker.


1

I think Elisha was rebuking not only the actions of Gehazi, but also the attitude of his heart. Gehazi accepted two talents of silver and two changes of clothes. Although opinion varies as to how much a talent weighed (maybe 25-35kg), it was certainly a lot of money. Perhaps, as he walked back, he was thinking about what he could do with such a large sum: ...


1

This story is very profound. It is interesting that manslaughter is typified through the dislocated ax head. That is, we read in the Law of Moses as follows. Deuteronomy 19:4-6 (NASB) 4 Now this is the case of the manslayer who may flee there and live: when he kills his friend unintentionally, not hating him previously— 5 as when a man goes into the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible