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The OP presents two arguments used by some in the issue of Elijah being or not taken to heaven. @gutenburgb have already addressed the second one and I'll address the first one. The original verb for the quoted "no man hath ascended up to heaven" (KJV Joh 3.13) is ἀναβέβηκεν, which is the perfect active indicative of ἀναβαίνω, to go up, to ascend, acc. to ...


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From my study I have come to the conclusion that Elijah wrote the "writing" before he was taken to heaven. It seems pretty clear that by "the prophet Elijah" the writer of Chronicles is not referring to a different Elijah. The Hebrew word miktab (translated "a writing") is also used in 2 Chron. 35:4 which says: And prepare yourselves by the houses of ...


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Elijah may have been "relocated" by the Lord. This would explain several things. First, as you mentioned, the likelihood of the Elijah mentioned in 2 Chronicles, someone who would have been in the natural life span of Elijah, is significant. The writer of the Kings and Chronicles was either the same person (presumably Jeremiah), or they relied heavily on the ...


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The Idea in Brief The Latin Vulgate appears to qualify and amplify the ambiguous meaning of the Masoretic Text. That is, Elijah gives his blessing for Elisha to return home to bid his family and friends good-bye because of the anointing by Elijah. Thus the Latin Vulgate adds "and return" (i.e., to me, Elijah). The basis for the Latin Vulgate reading may ...


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Combining Matthew Henry's insight here, Constable's insight here, and perhaps a soupçon of my own insight, I suggest we are safe in saying the following: Elijah's idiomatic expression, and possibly a common Hebraism in Elijah's day, "Go back again, for what have I done to you?" could be paraphrased as follows: "Go ahead. You're free to do as you like." ...



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