New answers tagged

-1

If you trace this reference from the opening of the book you see that the author of Ecclesiastes has begun by asking his theme question, "What do you gain from all your hard work under the sun?" Then he goes on to make the point that the cycles of nature continue and are not changed by our work. After this he tells us again what he is endeavouring to ...


-1

To answer this you need to first look at the question the author was seeking to answer, "What do you gain from all your hard work under the sun?" Ecclesiastes is first and foremost a theology of work and thus the majority of his reflections speak to that question first. When he says to put your best effort into whatever your hand finds to do it is on the ...


1

1. Question Restatement: Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity. — Ecclesiasites 1:2, KJV 2000 What is its literal meaning, in context? 2. Clarification Although "הָ֑בֶל" can denote "breath" and "vapor" -- it is certainly distinct from "ר֫וּחַ, (ruakh)", also wind - breath, or spirit. This term, "הָ֑בֶל" - is ...


0

The writer of Ecclesiastes uses the Hebrew word, hebel. It is one of those words that sounds like its meaning for it is spoken with a breathy sound. The word is translated as vapour, fleeting, smoke, breath (and occasionally by meaningless but that really doesn't fit at all). Although the author repeats the word a number of times at the beginning and end of ...



Top 50 recent answers are included