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It is safe to say that commentators through the centuries have found this pair the most puzzling of the catalogue of times in Ecclesiastes 3:2-8. And, as George Barton wrote in his ICC commentary of 1908, [t]he interpretation of the first clause is difficult. Observations There are obvious regularities and patterns in the pairs of opposites that are ...


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Further Analysis Davïd's answer gives a good statement about the verse, providing a very useful analysis. However, there are a couple of points of analysis for Eccl 3:1-8 that I believe are relevant, yet unexplored (likely both by Davïd and the commentaries he references). Four More Relevant Observations "More," because again, Davïd's observations are ...


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I have two answers, a simple meaning and an allegorical meaning. Simple meaning: After a home is built the excess stones are removed from the home (because they are in the way and no longer useful). Before a home is built we gather the stones to build the house. So this is a parallel of verse 3. See Metzudat David (an 18th C Jewish commentary that focuses ...


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1. Question Restatement Does Eccl. 1:15 suggest that ALL cannot be made straight, including the nature of men? Or is this phrase limited only to "The Works of Man"? Eccl 1:13, NASB - And I set my mind to seek and explore by wisdom concerning all that has been done under heaven. It is a grievous task which God has given to the sons of men to be ...


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There are two exegetical questions to consider in the phrase "nothing new under the sun": What is the scope of "under the sun"? This has been addressed elsewhere, and is likely to mean something like "in all creation". What is the contextual meaning of "nothing new"? Aside from context, at one extreme this could mean something like a 'Groundhog Day' ...


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The LXX could be construed to support either 'eternity' or 'the world' but not 'ignorance'. The relevant bit: καί γε σὺν τὸν αἰῶνα ἔδωκεν ἐν καρδίᾳ αὐτῶν (LXX, Rahlfs) indeed, he granted eternity in their heart (NETS) he has also set the whole world in their heart (Brenton) Both make sense as renditions of: גַּ֤ם אֶת־הָעֹלָם֙ נָתַ֣ן בְּלִבָּ֔ם ...


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The Idea in Brief There are three Jewish sources which relate that this particular passage in Ecclesiastes is not about misery resulting from wisdom: that is, the Babylonian Talmud, the commentary of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki ("Rashi"), who is also found in the Talmud, and finally Targum Qohelet each relate that the context of Ecclesiastes is not about misery ...


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Ecclesiastes is notoriously difficult to map. Many outlines have been proposed, none gaining consensus. Many commentators abandon the search for coherence altogether and conclude that the book is “a string of unrelated meditations” (Eaton), that "in general no progression of thought from one section to another is discernible" (Whybray).1 The book’s ...


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The Idea in Brief The comments of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki ("Rashi"), Jewish aggadic midrash (Qohelet Rabbah), the Targum Qohelet (Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible), and the structure of the Masoretic Text provide the picture of how Jewish scholars over the millennia had viewed the current passage at hand. That is, Solomon immersed himself in the ...


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In Ecclesiastes 2:26, the Preacher (son of David) says that God gave to those he considered good, the gifts of wisdom and knowledge. In this passage, at verses 1:17-18, the author talks about how he set out to know wisdom, madness and folly. He learnt that this also is vexation of spirit "For in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge ...


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Well, this is a famous crux, and there have been a number of solutions, some more plausible than others. Michael Fox thinks that הָעֹלָם is a scribal error for עָמֵל (toil) which occurs two verses earlier. Here it would be not the usual toil but the mental toil (amal b'libam) of understanding one's place in the world. There's also a fairly common ...


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1. Question Restatement: Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity. — Ecclesiasites 1:2, KJV 2000 What is its literal meaning, in context? 2. Clarification Although "הָ֑בֶל" can denote "breath" and "vapor" -- it is certainly distinct from "ר֫וּחַ, (ruakh)", also wind - breath, or spirit. This term, "הָ֑בֶל" - is ...


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In the first instance Kohelet is looking at all the oppression taking place upon the earth and noting that evil people are dominating others and there is no one who will rescue them. In a time of oppression and genocide the ones who died are indeed released from the evil and in that sense are better off. Those who are not yet born are not subject to those ...


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IT is simple.1 alone is safe 2 is safer 3 are safest.1 alone is good 2 is better 3 is best.This passage is used to get married alot because 1 alone is not good two together is great but when GOD is with the two it can not be broken.



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