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Ecclesiastes 7:27 unusually records: "says Qohelet" (אָמְרָה קֹהֶלֶת = ʾāmĕrâ qōhelet), notable for more than one reason. The problem here is the gender of the verb (which is, in the MT, 3rd feminine singular). The title "Qohelet", usually translated (when it is translated) as "the Preacher" or the like, only occurs in Eccl. 1:1, 2, 12; 7:27; 12:8, 9, 10 - ...


4

The LXX could be construed to support either 'eternity' or 'the world' but not 'ignorance'. The relevant bit: καί γε σὺν τὸν αἰῶνα ἔδωκεν ἐν καρδίᾳ αὐτῶν (LXX, Rahlfs) indeed, he granted eternity in their heart (NETS) he has also set the whole world in their heart (Brenton) Both make sense as renditions of: גַּ֤ם אֶת־הָעֹלָם֙ נָתַ֣ן בְּלִבָּ֔ם ...


4

There are two exegetical questions to consider in the phrase "nothing new under the sun": What is the scope of "under the sun"? This has been addressed elsewhere, and is likely to mean something like "in all creation". What is the contextual meaning of "nothing new"? Aside from context, at one extreme this could mean something like a 'Groundhog Day' ...


3

1. Question Restatement Does Eccl. 1:15 suggest that ALL cannot be made straight, including the nature of men? Or is this phrase limited only to "The Works of Man"? Eccl 1:13, NASB - And I set my mind to seek and explore by wisdom concerning all that has been done under heaven. It is a grievous task which God has given to the sons of men to be ...


3

The verse appears as follows in the Masoretic Text. Ecclesiastes 7:27 (MT) 27 רְאֵה זֶה מָצָאתִי אָמְרָה קֹהֶלֶת אַחַת לְאַחַת לִמְצֹא חֶשְׁבֹּֽון׃ The word קֹהֶלֶת is the same grammatical form as the feminine singular qal active participle, which is based on the triliteral root קָהַל, which means to assemble or call together (people or sayings). ...


3

The Masoretic Text appears to imply (Eccl 1:1) that the author is the son of David, the King of Jerusalem. Based in the wider genre of the Ketuvim (or Writings), the reader would then infer the son of David to be Solomon, the author. In this regard, Jewish tradition reflects the same. For example, the Targum Qohelet makes explicit mention that Solomon was ...


3

The following commentary from the Jewish Publication Society provides one suggested response to this very difficult question. Fox, Michael V. (2004). Ecclesiastes. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 52-53.


3

The Idea in Brief There are three Jewish sources which relate that this particular passage in Ecclesiastes is not about misery resulting from wisdom: that is, the Babylonian Talmud, the commentary of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki ("Rashi"), who is also found in the Talmud, and finally Targum Qohelet each relate that the context of Ecclesiastes is not about misery ...


2

Ecclesiastes is notoriously difficult to map. Many outlines have been proposed, none gaining consensus. Many commentators abandon the search for coherence altogether and conclude that the book is “a string of unrelated meditations” (Eaton), that "in general no progression of thought from one section to another is discernible" (Whybray).1 The book’s ...


2

The Idea in Brief The comments of Rabbi Shlomo Yitzchaki ("Rashi"), Jewish aggadic midrash (Qohelet Rabbah), the Targum Qohelet (Aramaic translation of the Hebrew Bible), and the structure of the Masoretic Text provide the picture of how Jewish scholars over the millennia had viewed the current passage at hand. That is, Solomon immersed himself in the ...


2

In Ecclesiastes 2:26, the Preacher (son of David) says that God gave to those he considered good, the gifts of wisdom and knowledge. In this passage, at verses 1:17-18, the author talks about how he set out to know wisdom, madness and folly. He learnt that this also is vexation of spirit "For in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge ...


2

Rashi sets forth two reasons for the connection, and other commentators have other interesting ideas. Rashi states first that the verse "Divide a portion into seven, and even into eight for you don't know what troubles shall be upon the earth" (Eccl. 11:2), refers to Succot, referring to a Midrash, Kohelet Rabbah 11:2, which quotes one opinion that the ...


2

The Book of Ecclesiates, known in Tanach as Kohellet and attributed to King Solomon, was controversial even before it was canonized by the rabbis. Many verses troubled them because they contradicted fundamental concepts in the Torah. In the end, the rabbis decided that the every less-than-holy statement in Kohellet was ultimately undone by Kohellets ...


1

R. N. Whybray says in 'The social world of the wisdom writers', published in The World of Ancient Israel (edited by R. E. Clements), page 242, that Ecclesiastes is one of the latest, if nor the latest, of the books of the Old Testament, as indicated above all by the language in which it is written, which, though unique in various ways, has close affinities ...



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