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10

I think the best answer is summed up by Peter Leithart (who admits to borrowing liberally from James Jordan on this): To get the point of Ecclesiastes, we have to ignore the usual translations of several key words or phrases. The Hebrew hebel has been translated as "vanity" (NASB, KJV, ESV, ASV) or "meaningless" (NIV, New Living Translation). The ...


7

Ecclesiastes 7:27 unusually records: "says Qohelet" (אָמְרָה קֹהֶלֶת = ʾāmĕrâ qōhelet), notable for more than one reason. The problem here is the gender of the verb (which is, in the MT, 3rd feminine singular). The title "Qohelet", usually translated (when it is translated) as "the Preacher" or the like, only occurs in Eccl. 1:1, 2, 12; 7:27; 12:8, 9, 10 - ...


7

The word 'return' Yes, 'return' is an accurate translation. The Hebrew verb is shūb (שוב), and means 'to turn back'. But what is 'spirit' referring to? Ecclesiastes 12.7 uses a handful of certain words and ideas: the body is made of dust and returns to the earth upon death; the spirit is from God and returns to him upon death. We're in the same realm of ...


7

Based on the uses in Eccl 1:2 the use of the word vanity in English was likely built on the Latin Vulgate use of "Vanitas Vanitatum". It was then translated Vanity of Vanities in a number of English translations including ESV, NASB(U), KJV, NKJV, ASV, RSV, Darby, Douay-Rheims, Noah Webster's, World English Bible and Young's Literal Translation. The idea of ...


7

I guess I prefer the "on earth" reading because the "life without God" reading requires a bit more pressing. I also wonder if the sun plays such an important role in Ecclesiastes because they may represent a common set of wisdom that was not specific to just Qoheleth. There are apparently some interesting parallels between Eccl. and Egyptian literature and ...


7

There does seem to be some confusion early on: Ecclesiastes 3:21 (NASB) Who knows that the breath of man ascends upward and the breath of the beast descends downward to the earth? Later, though, we see that the author of Ecclesiastes believes in the place called "Sheol" Ecclesiastes 9:10 (NASB) Whatever your hand finds to do, do it with all ...


6

As I've looked into it further, I think we have something along the lines of connotation verses denotation. The denotative meaning of the phrase "under the sun" in Ecclesiastes is "on earth," and this is neutral in meaning. Something being "under the sun" just means it is on the earth. Indeed, "within the realm of God's dominion" would fit there. ...


6

One of the themes of Ecclesiastes is the ignorance of the 'Preacher' and his intended audience, especially when it comes to the future, eg in chapter 2: 18Thus I hated all the fruit of my labor for which I had labored under the sun, for I must leave it to the man who will come after me. 19And who knows whether he will be a wise man or a fool? Yet he will ...


6

Absurd, as in this school of philosophy, does a good job of capturing what the book is all about. Chapter 1 3. What do people gain from all their labors at which they toil under the sun?  4. Generations come and generations go, but the earth remains forever. 5. The sun rises and the sun sets, and hurries back to where it rises...7. All streams ...


6

According to The Interpreter's Bible, the language is written in a late form of Hebrew and so: As judged by it's language, the book of Ecclesiastes is much later than the work of the Chronicler and later than the book of Esther (ca. 300 B.C.). If you agree with the 3rd century B.C. dating of Ecclesiastes, then perhaps it could be seen as an analogy, ...


6

Metaphors are a pithy way to express truth, and as such are heavily employed in proverbs such as this one, and indeed in all of wisdom literature. This metaphor should communicate strongly to anyone familiar with rope (or, interestingly, in our own day, cable). A rope woven from two strands is so easily unravelled that its disintegration is automatic—even ...


6

Ecclesiastes is a contemplation of meaning by the philosopher king (notionally Solomon), who calls himself Qoheleth. Unlike most wisdom literature in the Bible, which is phrased as dialog between the wise teacher and the student reader1, this text is semi-autobiographical meditations that dwell on the vanity of various aspects of life. The crux of the book ...


5

I found this obvious, and I can't resist referencing my own translation work that you can find posted on Wikisource: Cast your bread onto the waters, because in the many days, you shall find it. Give a part to seven, even to eight, because you will not know what evil will be on the Earth This is saying if you have bread, share it, let it "drift out on ...


4

The NET Bible notes: The meaning of קֹהֶלֶת (qohelet) is somewhat puzzling. The verb קָהַל (qahal) means “to assemble, summon” (HALOT 1078-79 s.v. קהל), and is derived from the noun קָהָל (qahal, “assembly”; HALOT 1079-80 s.v. קָהָל). Thus קֹהֶלֶת might mean: (1) convener of the assembly, (2) leader, speaker, teacher, or preacher of the assembly, or (3) ...


4

The book is not a book of negative wisdom exactly, it is a complementary, but realistic philosophy, composed by a person who struggles for wisdom in a state of complete doubt. This is the position of a Greek scholar (or a modern scientist). The book is a warning to Jewish scholars --- don't read too much and don't think too much--- you'll be a lonely ...


4

Well, it's certainly has to be taken as wisdom, since it's in the Bible it says it is wisdom (Ecc 7:23) it was written by the wisest man on the earth up to his time (Ecc 1:16, 1 Kings 4:29) While it is on the cynical side, that's because he relates his whole journey which also includes the learning experiences before he fully recognized the sovereignty ...


4

The Short Answer The word "evil" in context is best translated "injustice," although "evil" is a fine translation. Here are some variations in versions: ESV,NASB + others - "evil" NET - "injustice" ISV - "troublesome" HCSB - "wrong" Contextual Analysis Some features to notice: The passage describes more than one outcome, the opinion of the ...


4

There are two exegetical questions to consider in the phrase "nothing new under the sun": What is the scope of "under the sun"? This has been addressed elsewhere, and is likely to mean something like "in all creation". What is the contextual meaning of "nothing new"? Aside from context, at one extreme this could mean something like a 'Groundhog Day' ...


4

The LXX could be construed to support either 'eternity' or 'the world' but not 'ignorance'. The relevant bit: καί γε σὺν τὸν αἰῶνα ἔδωκεν ἐν καρδίᾳ αὐτῶν (LXX, Rahlfs) indeed, he granted eternity in their heart (NETS) he has also set the whole world in their heart (Brenton) Both make sense as renditions of: גַּ֤ם אֶת־הָעֹלָם֙ נָתַ֣ן בְּלִבָּ֔ם ...


3

Your link is behind a login. Here's an alternative source. The short answer to your question is "No".1 1 If I am wrong, the person on the planet who will know is Stuart Weeks. See his very recent paper on the interpretation of Qohelet (unpublished). His contact details are on his staff page, and if you sent him a short, polite request on Graetz, he might ...


3

The verse appears as follows in the Masoretic Text. Ecclesiastes 7:27 (MT) 27 רְאֵה זֶה מָצָאתִי אָמְרָה קֹהֶלֶת אַחַת לְאַחַת לִמְצֹא חֶשְׁבֹּֽון׃ The word קֹהֶלֶת is the same grammatical form as the feminine singular qal active participle, which is based on the triliteral root קָהַל, which means to assemble or call together (people or sayings). ...


3

This verse you are noticing is within the overall concept of a peaceful contentment in the moment which is not really a human ability but is a spiritual attitude that can only come from God. This simple contentment, such as the simple relaxed enjoyment of our daily eating and drinking as part of the essentials of living is contrasted with a meaningless ...


3

The following commentary from the Jewish Publication Society provides one suggested response to this very difficult question. Fox, Michael V. (2004). Ecclesiastes. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 52-53.


3

The Masoretic Text appears to imply (Eccl 1:1) that the author is the son of David, the King of Jerusalem. Based in the wider genre of the Ketuvim (or Writings), the reader would then infer the son of David to be Solomon, the author. In this regard, Jewish tradition reflects the same. For example, the Targum Qohelet makes explicit mention that Solomon was ...


3

1. Question Restatement Does Eccl. 1:15 suggest that ALL cannot be made straight, including the nature of men? Or is this phrase limited only to "The Works of Man"? Eccl 1:13, NASB - And I set my mind to seek and explore by wisdom concerning all that has been done under heaven. It is a grievous task which God has given to the sons of men to be ...


2

Under the sun—how beautiful is the poetry of the Old Testament! The swasheck and Frank Luke's answers, as well as the question itself, all contain some helpful thoughts. However, I think they have still failed to capture the full sense of the phrase. I would argue that its meaning is somewhere between in the physical world and life without God: more ...


2

The Book of Ecclesiates, known in Tanach as Kohellet and attributed to King Solomon, was controversial even before it was canonized by the rabbis. Many verses troubled them because they contradicted fundamental concepts in the Torah. In the end, the rabbis decided that the every less-than-holy statement in Kohellet was ultimately undone by Kohellets ...


2

Rashi sets forth two reasons for the connection, and other commentators have other interesting ideas. Rashi states first that the verse "Divide a portion into seven, and even into eight for you don't know what troubles shall be upon the earth" (Eccl. 11:2), refers to Succot, referring to a Midrash, Kohelet Rabbah 11:2, which quotes one opinion that the ...


2

In Ecclesiastes 2:26, the Preacher (son of David) says that God gave to those he considered good, the gifts of wisdom and knowledge. In this passage, at verses 1:17-18, the author talks about how he set out to know wisdom, madness and folly. He learnt that this also is vexation of spirit "For in much wisdom is much vexation, and he who increases knowledge ...



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