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I Sam 15:3 makes it pretty clear: "Now go and attack Amalek, and utterly destroy all that they have, and do not spare them. But kill both man and woman, infant and nursing child, ox and sheep, camel and donkey." This is pretty hard for us to accept, that even newborn babies would be slaughtered. But Samuel condemned Saul for even saving animals to ...


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This is a call to genocide, as the wording states, not hyperbole. Krish Kandiah refers to this as 'The Joshua Paradox'. Scott Hahn, Curtis Mitch (The Gospel of Mark, page 35) point out this is one of the many laws distinctive to Deuteronomy that are absent from earlier Mosaic legislation. First of all, a lesser fate applies in verses 20:10-15 to cities ...


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This is explained in the Samaritan Pentateuch In Exodus 23:19 which contains the following passage after the prohibition: כי עשה זאת כזבח שכח ועברה היא לאלהי יעקב This roughly translates to that one doing this as sacrifice forgets and enrages God of Jacob. This obviously makes this verse relevant to sacrifices only and thus these dietary ...


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Sacred prostitution was practised widely throughout the Mediterranean world and probably originated as a fertility ritual. The prostitute, whether male or female, could charge a fee on behalf of the temple for which he or she worked. These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. The practice ...


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The text of Deuteronomy 30 is a prophecy that the exiled descendants of Israel would one day take to heart " The Blessings and the curses" and turn back to the Lord and keep his commandments ( repentance) and he would circumcise their hearts and the hearts of their descendants. And it shall come to pass, when all these things are come upon thee, the ...



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