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18

No, it isn't an accurate translation. At a number of points it strains or simply falsifies the meaning of the Hebrew text. I'll take it phrase by phrase, but first, here's a key for the layout I'll use -- I hope it's clear. MT: The Masoretic text (Hebrew) Translit.: and its transliteration LXX: the Septuagint (ancient Greek translation) Translit.: and its ...


13

The question rests on a severe anachronism, in that many or most ancient cultures in contact with Israelite culture did not have a conceptualization of 'monotheism' or 'henotheism' until well after the biblical books were written. Just to illustrate this, the Greek word 'atheism' was used to describe the Jewish people, because from a Greco-Roman perspective ...


12

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his ...


11

Whether it's an accurate interpretation of the verse is something I'm not qualified to answer. But the article claims it to be a "literal" translation, and that appears quite obviously false. Translations No major Bible translation looks at it that way: Young's Literal Translation: "The habiliments of a man are not on a woman, nor doth a man put on ...


11

Here are the verses of relevance to this question in the BHS Hebrew text: לֹא־תִהְיֶ֥ה קְדֵשָׁ֖ה מִבְּנ֣וֹת יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וְלֹֽא־יִהְיֶ֥ה קָדֵ֖שׁ מִבְּנֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ לֹא־תָבִיא֩ אֶתְנַ֨ן זוֹנָ֜ה וּמְחִ֣יר כֶּ֗לֶב בֵּ֛ית יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ לְכָל־נֶ֑דֶר כִּ֧י תוֹעֲבַ֛ת יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ גַּם־שְׁנֵיהֶֽם׃ (Deuteronomy 23:18-19, which ...


7

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


5

My answer here will borrow from an essay by Michael Heiser (who I see left a comment on the page you linked to): Variants in Deuteronomy 32.8-9 Sons of Israel The Masoretic Text (MT) says בני ישראל, 'sons of Israel' 'Several later revisions' of the Septuagint (LXX) say sons of Israel Angels of God 'Most witnesses' of the LXX say αγγελων θεου, ...


4

It means just what it sounds like, a regular prostitute. The commandment means that a person of ill repute (male or female) may not take their wages for such an act and offer it to G-d as a sacrifice, if it is of the type which may be offered. The previous answer is incorrect in stating that this means "sacred prostitutes", and the example that he brings ...


4

I wanted to clear up the ambiguities the other answers have left around. Moses is reviewing the laws that were originally given in Exodus and Leviticus. This law is originally found in Exodus 22:16-17 (NKJV): If a man entices a virgin who is not betrothed, and lies with her, he shall surely pay the bride-price for her to be his wife. If her father ...


4

Prelims. Just for comparison, the three synoptic texts from UBS4: Mt 22:37 ὁ δὲ ἔφη αὐτῷ, Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· Mk 12:30 καὶ ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ψυχῆς σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς διανοίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ἰσχύος σου. Lk 10:27 ... ...


3

As to #1 - Different Quantity of Objects No reconciliation needed across the gospels, because if it is true that Christ said four things, he also said three things. There is no untruth in noting the lesser amount, just a shift in emphasis. Now as far as reconciling four things in the Greek with the three things of the Hebrew text, the Hebrew word לֵבָב ...


3

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


3

Using the reference at hand: JPS Torah Commentary on Deut, page 273, note on the verse: Mekelburg and some modern commentators suggest reading ho-`oniyyot as "in mourning, in a lamentful condition." They understand `oniyyot as `anniyyot, an abstract plural of `anniyah, 'mourning, lamenting'. The footnote, in turn, reads: Meklenburg; NEB; Mayes: ...


3

These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. We see in Genesis 38:15 that Judah had sex with Tamar because he did not recognise her with her face covered and thought her to be a sacred prostitute (kedeshah). The Book of Genesis contains some much older traditions, such as that quoted here, but ...


2

You might be helped with my answer to the following question: Why Moses ordered to keep virgins alive but kill all non-virgins and males in Numbers 31:17-18? In some ways your question is similar to the one I just cited. First, God commanded Israel to annihilate completely the inhabitants of Palestine/Canaan (specifically the "tribes" and "nations" ...


2

Bagpiipes, Consider that long before the Mosaic law, Cain was cursed because he killed Able. Notice also the account in Genesis 9:4-7 4 But you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. 5 And for your lifeblood I will surely demand an accounting. I will demand an accounting from every animal. And from each human being, too, I will ...


2

From Adam Clarke's commentary, *Most commentators are of opinion that Ezra was the author of the last chapter of Deuteronomy; some think it was Joshua, and others the seventy elders, immediately after the death of Moses; adding, that the book of Deuteronomy originally ended with the prophetic blessing upon the twelve tribes: 'Happy art thou, O ...


1

And the Lord shall become King over all the earth; on that day shall the Lord be one, and His name one.(Zech. 14:9) Rashi's commentary reads, *"shall the Lord be one: For all the nations shall abandon their vanities and acknowledge Him, that He is one, and [that] no strange deity is with Him,and His name one: That His name shall be mentioned ...


1

Deuteronomy 6:7: and you must inculcate them in your sons and speak of them when you sit in your house and when you walk on the road and when you lie down and when you get up. Essentially God commanded his people to teach their children his ways. Deuteronomy 31:12, which says: ‘Congregate the people, the men and the women and the little ones..., in ...


1

The classic Jewish commentator Rashi says [Scripture] is speaking of [someone who causes harm to his fellow Jew through] slander quoting Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer 53.


1

In fact it was an (ancient?) common war usage because males are usually consider more dangerous. Jugurtha, king of Numidia, in 112 BC killed all the adult males of Cirta. Thucydides reports an interesting debate about the fate of the Mytileneans during the Peloponnesian War there were two different position: Kleon wanted to kill all the Mythilenens adult ...


1

What is meant by being brought "back in ships to Egypt"? Did this happen historically? I find no reason from the text in question to assume that the Lord's threat to "send you (national Israel) back to Egypt in ships" is anything but literal. I take it to mean specifically the nation as a whole because the entire address regarding the Blessings and the ...



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