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16

No, it isn't an accurate translation. At a number of points it strains or simply falsifies the meaning of the Hebrew text. I'll take it phrase by phrase, but first, here's a key for the layout I'll use -- I hope it's clear. MT: The Masoretic text (Hebrew) Translit.: and its transliteration LXX: the Septuagint (ancient Greek translation) Translit.: and its ...


12

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his ...


11

Here are the verses of relevance to this question in the BHS Hebrew text: לֹא־תִהְיֶ֥ה קְדֵשָׁ֖ה מִבְּנ֣וֹת יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וְלֹֽא־יִהְיֶ֥ה קָדֵ֖שׁ מִבְּנֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ לֹא־תָבִיא֩ אֶתְנַ֨ן זוֹנָ֜ה וּמְחִ֣יר כֶּ֗לֶב בֵּ֛ית יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ לְכָל־נֶ֑דֶר כִּ֧י תוֹעֲבַ֛ת יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ גַּם־שְׁנֵיהֶֽם׃ (Deuteronomy 23:18-19, which ...


10

Whether it's an accurate interpretation of the verse is something I'm not qualified to answer. But the article claims it to be a "literal" translation, and that appears quite obviously false. Translations No major Bible translation looks at it that way: Young's Literal Translation: "The habiliments of a man are not on a woman, nor doth a man put on ...


7

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


5

My answer here will borrow from an essay by Michael Heiser (who I see left a comment on the page you linked to): Variants in Deuteronomy 32.8-9 Sons of Israel The Masoretic Text (MT) says בני ישראל, 'sons of Israel' 'Several later revisions' of the Septuagint (LXX) say sons of Israel Angels of God 'Most witnesses' of the LXX say αγγελων θεου, ...


4

It means just what it sounds like, a regular prostitute. The commandment means that a person of ill repute (male or female) may not take their wages for such an act and offer it to G-d as a sacrifice, if it is of the type which may be offered. The previous answer is incorrect in stating that this means "sacred prostitutes", and the example that he brings ...


4

Jacob Milgrom considers four theories about how the command came about: Maimonides suggested that it was a reaction to a specific Canaanite practice. Philo suggested the practice was inhuman for the same reason killing a young animal and its mother on the same day or killing an animal before it's weaned. Beginning with the work of Émile Durkheim, it has ...


4

The commingling of life and death was sacrilegious in the Hebrew Bible. For example, animals that are scavengers (lobster, shrimp, swine, dogs, vultures, lions and tigers, etc.) may thrive by habit on waste (garbage, refuse, scum, and/or other dead and decayed creatures), and thus they are unclean. Such animals could not be used for human consumption or ...


4

The three festivals (Pesach, Shavuot, Sukkot) were times when everybody was commanded to assemble in Jerusalem. They were celebrated with festive meals, including some of the meat that had been offered on the altar. (These offerings are listed throughout Exodus, Leviticus, and Numbers.) The rabbis of the talmud understood that Shabbat should also include ...


4

Technically, Deuteronomy is written in third person. The first five verses are in third person, ending with "Moses began to expound this law, saying:" Moses speaks from chapter 2 through chapter 30, and the main narration begins again with chapter 31 with occasional dialogue Moses recites a poem/song in chapter 32:1-43, and then the narration begins again ...


4

Prelims. Just for comparison, the three synoptic texts from UBS4: Mt 22:37 ὁ δὲ ἔφη αὐτῷ, Ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ καρδίᾳ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ ψυχῇ σου καὶ ἐν ὅλῃ τῇ διανοίᾳ σου· Mk 12:30 καὶ ἀγαπήσεις κύριον τὸν θεόν σου ἐξ ὅλης τῆς καρδίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ψυχῆς σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς διανοίας σου καὶ ἐξ ὅλης τῆς ἰσχύος σου. Lk 10:27 ... ...


3

As to #1 - Different Quantity of Objects No reconciliation needed across the gospels, because if it is true that Christ said four things, he also said three things. There is no untruth in noting the lesser amount, just a shift in emphasis. Now as far as reconciling four things in the Greek with the three things of the Hebrew text, the Hebrew word לֵבָב ...


3

Blotting out the memory of Amalek can't mean completely eliminating any memory of same, because the torah itself tells us about Amalek and there is no indication that humans have permission to alter the text of the torah. So blotting out Amalek must mean something else. The medieval commentator Rashi (Rabbi Shlomo ben Yitzchak) wrote on Deut 25:19: you ...


3

In Gen 15:5 God promises Avram that his seed shall be as numerous as the stars. It doesn't say "his seed living at any one time"; the straightforward reading is that it means all of them. The 603,550 men counted in the desert census (Num 1:46) are from but one generation. Since descendants of Avraham continue to be born to this day, we have not yet ...


3

The passage here includes the phrase: לֹא תָחוֹס עֵינֶךָ You shall not have pity. This same text also appears in Deut 19:21: וְלֹא תָחוֹס, עֵינֶךָ: נֶפֶשׁ בְּנֶפֶשׁ, עַיִן בְּעַיִן שֵׁן בְּשֵׁן, יָד בְּיָד, רֶגֶל בְּרָגֶל. And thine eye shall not pity: life for life, eye for eye, tooth for tooth, hand for hand, foot for foot. We ...


3

Although Niobius' answer is good, it misses a bit of the point. G-d gives a childless Avram two metaphors to understand (a) that he would have a lot of progeny, and (b) that they had both tremendous potential to achieve great heights and also to suffer great lows. First, let me give you a fascinating look into how the Jewish Midrashic tales from the Torah ...


3

Using the reference at hand: JPS Torah Commentary on Deut, page 273, note on the verse: Mekelburg and some modern commentators suggest reading ho-`oniyyot as "in mourning, in a lamentful condition." They understand `oniyyot as `anniyyot, an abstract plural of `anniyah, 'mourning, lamenting'. The footnote, in turn, reads: Meklenburg; NEB; Mayes: ...


3

These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. We see in Genesis 38:15 that Judah had sex with Tamar because he did not recognise her with her face covered and thought her to be a sacred prostitute (kedeshah). The Book of Genesis contains some much older traditions, such as that quoted here, but ...


2

You might be helped with my answer to the following question: Why Moses ordered to keep virgins alive but kill all non-virgins and males in Numbers 31:17-18? In some ways your question is similar to the one I just cited. First, God commanded Israel to annihilate completely the inhabitants of Palestine/Canaan (specifically the "tribes" and "nations" ...


2

Bagpiipes, Consider that long before the Mosaic law, Cain was cursed because he killed Able. Notice also the account in Genesis 9:4-7 4 But you shall not eat flesh with its life, that is, its blood. 5 And for your lifeblood I will surely demand an accounting. I will demand an accounting from every animal. And from each human being, too, I will ...


1

The classic Jewish commentator Rashi says [Scripture] is speaking of [someone who causes harm to his fellow Jew through] slander quoting Pirkei d’Rabbi Eliezer 53.


1

Deutoronomy or Debarim (The Words) is, what Moses spoke to Israel towards the end of their travels through the wildernis and deserts of Arabia, and it were his final words to them before he died and before they entered the land. So much of it is direct speech it would have been unnatural, had he spoken of himself in third person after all these (almost 40 ...


1

In fact it was an (ancient?) common war usage because males are usually consider more dangerous. Jugurtha, king of Numidia, in 112 BC killed all the adult males of Cirta. Thucydides reports an interesting debate about the fate of the Mytileneans during the Peloponnesian War there were two different position: Kleon wanted to kill all the Mythilenens adult ...


1

According to Jacob Milgrom: Both ideas inhering in the kid prohibition—the reverence for life and Israel's separation from the nations—are also present in the dietary laws, the former in the blood prohibition and the latter in the animal prohibitions. Thus the kid prohibition was automatically locked into Israel's dietary system. Therefore, ...


1

There is no contradiction between Dt 5:9 and 24:16. As with so many things, the answer to your question is not an "either/or" but a "both/and." I also agree with this answer that "visiting" is not exactly the same as "punishing," even though the NIV uses the word "punishing." Sin is an insidious thing. Since no man or woman is an island, our sinful ...


1

What is meant by being brought "back in ships to Egypt"? Did this happen historically? I find no reason from the text in question to assume that the Lord's threat to "send you (national Israel) back to Egypt in ships" is anything but literal. I take it to mean specifically the nation as a whole because the entire address regarding the Blessings and the ...



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