Hot answers tagged

11

The word used in verses 14, 17, and 18 is bətûlîm, “evidence(s) of virginity.” This is from bətûlâ, “virgin”, which is used in verse 19 to describe a woman thus evidenced. It refers to the custom of retaining a blood-stained sheet or cloth from the bed where a marriage is consummated. The blood (dam betulim) is said to “prove” the bride’s virginity as it ...


7

The Hebrew term here is טַף (ṭaf), a noun always used as a collective. The hint of a specific age limit for this group comes from Numbers 14:29-31. Here Yahweh tells the people that those over the age of twenty will die in the wilderness and not enter the promised land, a punishment for their complaints and disobedience. Your dead bodies shall fall ...


6

Within the surrounding dialogues various parties (the Pharisees and Sadducees) try to entrap Jesus, but this skeptical scribe listens and affirms the truth when he hears it. We would expect the scribe to believe Jesus' answer to be a basically agreed upon interpretation of what is the greatest commandment, but we would not expect him to add in, "...is ...


5

In the article Hebrew Henotheism: Challenging the notion of Biblical Monotheism, the case is made that the Shema was to be understood relationally with Israel. The 1985 edition of the Jewish Publication Society translation of the TaNaKH portrays this when they translate the verse as “Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD alone.” This reading ...


5

The comment of the Apostle Paul that “The worker deserves his pay” appears to have been the prevailing interpretation of this verse according to the oral traditions of the Jews during the First Century and beyond. For example, in regard to this passage from Deuteronomy, the Jewish historian Flavius Josephus wrote the following in his compendium on the ...


5

These reference the words of Jesus, found in Luke 10:7 (emphasis mine): 7 And remain in the same house, eating and drinking such things as they give, for the laborer is worthy of his wages. Do not go from house to house. Peter calls Paul's writings Scripture as well: 14 Therefore, beloved, looking forward to these things, be diligent to be found by ...


5

The Tetragrammaton (YHWH, pronounced Yahweh) was a name for God, but is often written as LORD in English translations. 'Elohim is a plural form of 'El and therefore means gods, except when used with a singular verb or in a singular context, when it becomes a name for God. Here, the verb is singular and the context is reference to YHWH, so the correct ...


5

Broad comments on Deuteronomy's theology Deuteronomy is known for containing the Shema, which reads: Hear, O Israel: Yahweh our God, Yahweh is one. You shall love Yahweh your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might. This has traditionally been taken as an explicit proclamation of monotheistic belief. Deuteronomy also ...


4

Deuteronomy 32:1-43 is known as the Song of Moses, as we see by the following verse: Deuteronomy 32:44: So Moses, together with Joshua, son of Nun, went and recited all the words of this song for the people to hear. That does not mean that we necessarily have to believe that Moses really sang this song to the Israelites. We can not say with any ...


4

The verse begins by referring to "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" ("chicks or eggs"). It then refers to "בָּנִים", which, while translated as "young", literally means "sons", and here means "children". Since both the chicks and the eggs are the children of the mother, the terms "אֶפְרֹחִים אֹו בֵיצִים" and "בָּנִים" are equivalent, and one may eat both the chicks ...


3

At issue is the meaning of three Hebrew words or phrases: חָרַם, charam: ‘to exterminate’ or ‘destroy completely’; יָרַשׁ, yarash: ‘to destroy’ or ‘dispossess’; and לֹא תְחַיֶּה כָּל־נְשָׁמָֽה: “not keep alive any breathing” (e.g. De.20:16, YLT). Within the genocide stories in Deuteronomy, the meaning of these words is clear and literal. As in ...


2

I wouldn't necessarily read a direct reference to Deuteronomy 32. The statement in 1:9 is a negation of the common language of covenant. The positive phrasing is common in Scripture: Exodus 6:7 I will take you as my own people, and I will be your God. Leviticus 26:12 And I will walk among you and will be your God, and you shall be my people. ...


2

Jewish law interprets this as an enjoineder against using undue force in a confrontation. If the action were justified, there'd be no punishment. In addition, the Talmud considers 'cutting off the hand' as indicating the payment of a fine--one's hand seen as figuratively as the recipient of (financial) gain. In Jewish penal law there may be a death ...


1

Deuteronomy 32 and 33 sounds so schizophrenic because, as Jeff S. Anderson says (The Blessing and the Curse: Trajectories in the Theology of the Old Testament, page 65), the blessing in Deuteronomy 33 is considered by critical scholars to be a likely insertion into the Deuteronomic material. Deuteronomy 32:48-52 and 34:1-4 are so closely related that, when ...


1

Most scholars who believe that Ancient Israel was henotheistic also accept some for of the Documentary Hypothesis and therefore assume that Deuteronomy, including the Shema, was written at a later date, after the Israelites had switched from henotheism to monotheism. (The DH does not assume that the theology is consistent across different parts of the Hebrew ...


1

I'd like to make three preliminary points, then answer the original question. First, a passage that was not mentioned commands the Israelites to completely destroy fellow Jews, should they turn to idolatry: 12“If you hear someone in one of your cities, which the Lord your God gives you to dwell in, saying, 13‘Corrupt men have gone out from among you ...


1

I Sam 15:3 makes it pretty clear: "Now go and attack Amalek, and utterly destroy all that they have, and do not spare them. But kill both man and woman, infant and nursing child, ox and sheep, camel and donkey." This is pretty hard for us to accept, that even newborn babies would be slaughtered. But Samuel condemned Saul for even saving animals to ...


1

Sacred prostitution was practised widely throughout the Mediterranean world and probably originated as a fertility ritual. The prostitute, whether male or female, could charge a fee on behalf of the temple for which he or she worked. These are not common prostitutes, but sacred prostitutes, for which the Hebrew language uses different words. The practice ...


1

The Hebrew word "טַף" is translated to Aramaic as "טפלא" (taphla) which also means "dependent", "needing the care of others". Young children obviously qualify for this, but also the sick, elderly, etc. In the context of war, it means that only the war men should be killed, while the weak and dependent population should be kept alive.


1

The Amalekites represent the forces of evil in the world. This explains why they must be fought in each generation. It also explains the ferocity of the hatred shown to the Amalekites in the Bible. In the Book of Esther, for instance, we learn that Haman was a direct descendant of Agag, King of the Amalekites. This same Haman was plotting the destruction of ...


1

I'm not too familiar with Koine Greek (except getting a grade C for introductory Koine Greek in Bible school). As well as, since the septuagint is not dependable translation, and should not be used authoritatively. I can only comment better on the Hebrew. Deut 32:21 (I placed a hyphen to separate the pronouns) הם קנאו-ני בלא אל The word-literal ...


1

The issue described is not a joke. I believe when properly understood, this passage should be seen as one of the most significant in the Old Testament. There is no written record of what is described ever being done. That is one of the reasons it is difficult to determine the meaning. Lacking a real event to demonstrate how this should be applied, we are ...


1

Does this passage describe the crime of rape? Yes, Deuteronomy 22:28-29 describes what's known today as rape. If so, does this passage describe the all punishment the man will endure? Yes. The man just has to pay a fine to the virgins father for lowering her property value. She's now 'used goods'. If so, how does this represent justice for ...


1

Let's not complicate the why of this. Remember how Jesus said that I give you 2 new commandments? One was to Love God and the other was to love people. He also stated that on these 2 hang all the law. In summary, He was simply saying, if you love me, obey these 4.(1st Tablet) If you love others obey these 6.(2nd Tablet)



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible