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28

In the 1950s, a guy named Ras Shamra unearthed tablets which may describe a Ugaritic pagan ritual of a kid being cooked in milk. You can read all about Ras Shamra's discoveries in this PDF document (info on this topic on p.5). In the above article and in countless others I've read, this ritual is described as historical fact and assumed without any ...


25

One of the principles of talmudic reasoning is that there are no unnecessary words in torah -- so since this law is stated three times, we must be able to learn something new from each statement. Tractate Chullin (113-116) explains that there are three prohibitions: cooking meat and milk together eating such a mixture deriving benefit from such a mixture ...


16

No, it isn't an accurate translation. At a number of points it strains or simply falsifies the meaning of the Hebrew text. I'll take it phrase by phrase, but first, here's a key for the layout I'll use -- I hope it's clear. MT: The Masoretic text (Hebrew) Translit.: and its transliteration LXX: the Septuagint (ancient Greek translation) Translit.: and its ...


12

I will show three things: 1) The law has no retroactive force: a man is not condemned for breaking a law which did not exist until later. 2) Moses did not break the law you quote. 3) God did not defend Moses' marriage, but his person. 1) THE LAW HAS NO RETROACTIVE FORCE Abraham married his half-sister. Lev 20:17 ‘If a man takes his sister, his ...


11

RJ Rushdoony in his Institutes of Biblical Law vol 1 Pg 300 says: The Ras Shamra tablets indicate that such seething was a Canaanite sacred ritual. It would appear that the fertility cults believed that they could either stimulate or destroy fertility at will, since it was under their control. It is speculated that this law was implemented as an act of ...


11

Here are the verses of relevance to this question in the BHS Hebrew text: לֹא־תִהְיֶ֥ה קְדֵשָׁ֖ה מִבְּנ֣וֹת יִשְׂרָאֵ֑ל וְלֹֽא־יִהְיֶ֥ה קָדֵ֖שׁ מִבְּנֵ֥י יִשְׂרָאֵל׃ לֹא־תָבִיא֩ אֶתְנַ֨ן זוֹנָ֜ה וּמְחִ֣יר כֶּ֗לֶב בֵּ֛ית יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ לְכָל־נֶ֑דֶר כִּ֧י תוֹעֲבַ֛ת יְהוָ֥ה אֱלֹהֶ֖יךָ גַּם־שְׁנֵיהֶֽם׃ (Deuteronomy 23:18-19, which ...


10

Whether it's an accurate interpretation of the verse is something I'm not qualified to answer. But the article claims it to be a "literal" translation, and that appears quite obviously false. Translations No major Bible translation looks at it that way: Young's Literal Translation: "The habiliments of a man are not on a woman, nor doth a man put on ...


9

I decided to build a canonical answer to this question, since it seemed that all three answers had something to offer. Greek and Hebrew The Hebrew word yare (Strongs H3372) carries a number of meanings. There is both the definition being "terrified" or "afraid" along with the definition of having "reverence", "awe", or "respect". In Greek, the word ...


9

According to classical Jewish interpretation, Dt 22:22-29 all deal with various situations of forcible and statutory rape as well as extramarital relations. The differences in the cases are mainly: the woman's marital status the woman's virginity the degree of consent or lack thereof that can be inferred from the geography Verse 22:28 deals with only one ...


9

Dr. Meshulam Margaliot points out that Midrashic tradition is divided about what was written on which tablet. The options seem to be: 1–5 on one and 6–10 on the other. (This is the tradition interpretation that is most common in art and synagogue decoration.) All 10 on each tablet. Even numbered on one and odd on the other (as suggested by ...


8

Probably not. The word used for Rahab in Joshua 2 is zanah <02181>. According to Wikipedia: The Hebrew Bible uses two different words for prostitute, zonah (זנה)‎ and kedeshah (קדשה)‎. The word zonah simply meant an ordinary prostitute or loose woman. But the word kedeshah literally means "consecrated (feminine form)", from the Semitic root q-d-sh ...


8

Could not the Lord have "instigated" the people to spy the land through indirect means, and therefore solve the conundrum? For example, Satan incited David to number the Israelites in a census (1 Chr 21:1), but in 2 Sam 24:1 it is the Lord who is the subject of the Hebrew verb סוּת, and therefore in the immediate grammatical context it was the Lord who had ...


7

Deut. 32:20 and Hab 2:4 both contain the Hebrew word emun (Heb: אמון), translated in the KJV as "faith." Emun is H529 in Strong's where it's defined as "faithfulness, trusting." However, the word emun derives from the root word aman (Heb: אמן), which is a very common word in the Bible. Aman is strong's H539 where it's defined as: "to support, confirm, be ...


7

I've often heard that 'fear' as in 'fear the LORD' should not be understood to be 'fear' as in 'afraid', but rather 'awe' and 'reverence'. But myself, I want to be cautious about watering down the 'fear' as in 'afraid' side, because: I feel a sort of cultural pressure to do so which I think I then read back into the bible There are usages that clearly ...


7

...I am the Lord, and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will deliver you from their bondage, and I will redeem you with an outstretched arm, and with great judgments; and I will take you to Me for a people, and I will be to you a God; and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God, who brought you out from under ...


7

Gen 22:17 That in blessing I will bless thee, and in multiplying I will multiply thy seed as the stars of the heaven, and as the sand which is upon the sea shore; God promised Abraham that his descendants would be as the sand of the sea, and as the stars of heaven. These two metaphors are in direct apposition to each other, and explain each other. The ...


6

The exact reason for Ruth being introduced to the transaction is undetermined in scholarly literature (Expositor's Bible Commentary Introduction to Ruth). Here is one possibility that isn't explicit from Scripture, but I can see the law being interpreted this way. Not only must the land stay in the clan, but it must stay as close within the family as ...


6

Levirate marriage in the Bible predates the legal source you reference in Deuteronomy 25: And Judah said unto Onan: 'Go in unto thy brother's wife, and perform the duty of a husband's brother unto her, and raise up seed to thy brother.' (Genesis 38:8 JPS) Therefore, Boaz's concern with levirate marriage and the keeping of property in the family ...


6

There is an obvious implied rule from the actual listed forbidden birds, that you can use to infer the rules: birds that eat seeds or insects are fine, birds that eat meat, fish, or carrion are not. It's basically an injunction against birds of prey, sea-birds, and carrion birds, and (I believe) this is how it is interpreted. So that if you ask is an emu ok, ...


6

There does not seem to be any way to narrow the gap. This might be intentional, the intent being to establish a generally negative moral value to kings gathering harems, but allowing for the necessity of politically expedient marriages with foreign royal families. The term "many wives" is as specific as the OT gets. Kings 11:4 is clearly an indictment of ...


6

The word in Exodus 20:21 which you translate as 'tool' is the Hebrew חרב which most literaly means 'sword'. Rashi there explains that a sword is designed to shorten life, while an altar is designed to lengthen life by being used to achieve atonement. It makes sense, therefore, that one should not be used in the formation of the other.


5

The NET Bible note reads: Heb “the sons of Israel.” The idea, perhaps, is that Israel was central to Yahweh’s purposes and all other nations were arranged and distributed according to how they related to Israel. See S. R. Driver, Deuteronomy (ICC), 355-56. For the MT יִשְׂרָאֵל בְּנֵי (bÿney yisra’el, “sons of Israel”) a Qumran fragment has “sons of ...


5

Well, how you reconcile contradictions in the Bible depends largely on your orientation to reading and interpreting the Bible. :) My own belief is that the Bible speaks with multiple voices, and so it is essentially disingenuous to pretend that "the Bible says" one thing about a particular topic. Different parts of the Bible express different perspectives ...


4

According to the Sages of the Talmud, "entering into the assembly" means marriage. Maimonides codifies this law of the four nations as follows: Any gentile who converts to Judaism and accepts upon himself all the commandments of the Torah and slaves who are freed from slavery, attain the status of a Jew as the verse says: 'As for the congregation, ...


4

Jacob Milgrom considers four theories about how the command came about: Maimonides suggested that it was a reaction to a specific Canaanite practice. Philo suggested the practice was inhuman for the same reason killing a young animal and its mother on the same day or killing an animal before it's weaned. Beginning with the work of Émile Durkheim, it has ...


4

The commingling of life and death was sacrilegious in the Hebrew Bible. For example, animals that are scavengers (lobster, shrimp, swine, dogs, vultures, lions and tigers, etc.) may thrive by habit on waste (garbage, refuse, scum, and/or other dead and decayed creatures), and thus they are unclean. Such animals could not be used for human consumption or ...


4

It isn't necessarily a contradiction; perhaps "visiting the iniquities of the fathers on the children" doesn't mean punishing the children for parental sins. The text doesn't say "punish", after all. This was explained to me by analogy with alcoholism: the children of alcoholics are more likely than average to become alcoholics themselves, so in a sense ...


4

Calvin, Gill citing Maimonides, and Mathew Henry all give the reason as the prevention of idolatry. Drawn from them: Such an altar is easily thrown down to prevent idolatry associated with it. This would remove the temptation of making it into a sort of graven image. The other nations cut stones for their altars Many holiness laws have them not do things ...


4

(This answer is from a Christian perspective.) Since this question deals with the significance of the imagery, it is helpful to look at other places in Scripture that use similar imagery. 1) 1 Kings 18:30-32 recounts a time when Elijah rebuilt one of these altars after it had been torn down: Then Elijah said to all the people, “Now come to me.” So ...


4

When the Israelites entered the Promised Land the Amalekites had “tripped them up.” That is, they attacked the Israelites at their weak spot, or at their hindermost part or "tail," which was comprised of those who had lagged behind (Deut 25:17). The Hebrew word for the hindermost part of the body is עָקֵב, which is used in the Hebrew Bible to refer to the ...



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