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The Greek word appears four times in the Christian New Testament, and in every case (except Acts 2:24) the reference is to the agony and pain associated with birth pangs. Thus if we read the New Testament in Greek, and we come to this passage at hand, we have this idea that sin somehow sires death; that is the birth pangs of sin are death according to ...


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Be careful not to bring theological and cultural assumptions to the text, namely that Hades and heaven are separate places (and the corresponding ideas about what they are).1 The notions of 'heaven' and 'hell' in Western culture were foreign in the mindset of first-century Judea, and thus reading these ideas back into the text is anachronistic.2 What is ...


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The Devil is considered a prince of a kingdom. To be a prince he must have some kind of power that he wields over his subjects. If we said a king has the power of wealth, we mean he has a lot of money and that he exerts a lot of influence by it. In the same way the 'power of sin' or 'power of death' is something one can have and exert influence with. The ...


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Short Answer: Yes, the "fear of death" refers to being afraid of physically dying, as shown by the context in which it is used. The point is that Christ's solidarity with His people gave His people hope, thereby freeing them up to live the life He was calling them to without concern for what it might cost them. The passage is not about unbelievers and ...


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To an unbeliever, there are two deaths. First the physical death, then the eternal death. An unbeliever will not acknowledge the second and therefore can only fear the physical. "But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth ...



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