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"Hades" is the Greek word for the realm of the dead. In the Greek Septuagint, it replaces the Hebrew word "Sheol". There's not a lot of description of Hades within the main canon - chiefly the parable in Luke 16 - but generally it is considered the holding place for the souls of the dead until the final judgement. It is sometimes thought to be divided into ...


7

While it is true that David was a man after God's own heart, he was also a man who had no scruples about killing. Take, most famously, as an example, Uriah. Uriah was killed for the grievous offense of having a hot wife! In the case of Joab, it was a political revenge killing, pure and simple. David says in 1 Kings 2: 5 “Now you yourself know what ...


5

Differentiating between "Purpose" and "Grounds" You ask: Why would The Lord allow Satan to have the power to take other lives just for the purpose of proving that Job is a loyal servant? The short answer is that God's "grounds" for having those people die is their own sin, not Job's testing. God allowed it to happen when and how it did for the ...


5

Be careful not to bring theological and cultural assumptions to the text, namely that Hades and heaven are separate places (and the corresponding ideas about what they are).1 The notions of 'heaven' and 'hell' in Western culture were foreign in the mindset of first-century Judea, and thus reading these ideas back into the text is anachronistic.2 What is ...


4

The Greek word appears four times in the Christian New Testament, and in every case (except Acts 2:24) the reference is to the agony and pain associated with birth pangs. Thus if we read the New Testament in Greek, and we come to this passage at hand, we have this idea that sin somehow sires death; that is the birth pangs of sin are death according to ...


3

God allows millions of innocent people to die today, probably at the hands of Satan either directly or indirectly (not that those who died were innocent, only that they died NOT because of their sins). So I think the real rub of the question is, "... just to prove that Job is loyal." So perhaps you agree that God allows millions to die at Satan's hands. I ...


2

Martin Luther answered this question well, but in a very general way: "Behold, God governs the external affairs of the world in such a way that if you regard and follow the judgment of human reason you are forced to say either that there is no God, or that God is unjust." (from "On the Bondage of the Will" published 1525) The deaths of Job's sons and ...


2

In Revelation 20:14, what is Death, Hades, and the Lake of Fire? My thoughts on this question: o "Death" is physical death. o "Hades" is the place of the dead (usually used of the wicked dead in the NT). o "Death" and "hades" go together since each one implies the other. o "Death" often occurs in the same verse as "hades" in OT verses (in the ...


1

The Devil is considered a prince of a kingdom. To be a prince he must have some kind of power that he wields over his subjects. If we said a king has the power of wealth, we mean he has a lot of money and that he exerts a lot of influence by it. In the same way the 'power of sin' or 'power of death' is something one can have and exert influence with. The ...


1

Short Answer: Yes, the "fear of death" refers to being afraid of physically dying, as shown by the context in which it is used. The point is that Christ's solidarity with His people gave His people hope, thereby freeing them up to live the life He was calling them to without concern for what it might cost them. The passage is not about unbelievers and ...


1

To an unbeliever, there are two deaths. First the physical death, then the eternal death. An unbeliever will not acknowledge the second and therefore can only fear the physical. "But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth ...


1

...I still don't feel that Joab should have been punished... Feelings. Bah. Remember, this was David passing sentence, not God. Nothing says that David has to feel about things the same way you do, especially considering he lived in a very different and more brutal age. For that matter, even if it was God, at no time should we ever be so arrogant to ...



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