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5

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


3

The answer is no, because there is no real evidence that King David wrote any of the psalms attributed to him. James Luther Mays says in Psalms, page 9, that the personal identities of the authors of the Psalms are unknown. He says the quest for the origin of individual psalms leads to occasions in Israel's public exercise of religion, not to their authors. ...


3

Note that when it comes to literal versus figurative use of language, it does not matter what the language is. In other words, there is nothing inherent in the Hebrew language versus the English language that helps determine if a word, phrase, or clause should be taken literally or figuratively. Rather, context of a statement, in any language, is primarily ...


2

King David certainly has a greater role in Jewish tradition, and is more revered in modern Judaism. However, it was King Josiah who introduced religious reforms now known as the Deuteronomistic reforms, including monotheism and the requirement that sacrifices could only be made in the temple in Jerusalem. The Book of Kings (which centuries later was divided ...


2

The example Jesus cites, David getting the showbread, contains two authorities. One is King David over his men and the other is the high priest over the Bread of the Presence: So the priest gave him holy bread; for there was no bread there but the showbread which had been taken from before the LORD, in order to put hot bread in its place on the day when ...


2

In doing some research on this subject, this is what I found. According to the ISBE She [Abhishag], had an intimate knowledge of the condition of David, and was present at the interview of Bathsheba with David which resulted in the placing of Solomon on the throne. If that act had been questioned she would have been a most important witness. By reason of ...


1

As @seedy3 already concluded, Abishag was a wife of King David, though he never had intercourse with her (1 King 1:1-4). But it would not have been adultery to marry the wife of King David in this case. David was already dead. It's even possible Salomon later took Abishag as his wife as the King's wifes were part of the crown posession. Lev 20:11 talks ...



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