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5

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


4

The 6th century BC is when some scholars believe the story of David and Goliath was written, not when it actually took place. For example, Jacob L. Wright, Associate Professor of Hebrew Bible at Emory University, has written that the most popular legends about David, including his killing of Goliath, his affair with Bathsheba, and his ruling of a United ...


2

In doing some research on this subject, this is what I found. According to the ISBE She [Abhishag], had an intimate knowledge of the condition of David, and was present at the interview of Bathsheba with David which resulted in the placing of Solomon on the throne. If that act had been questioned she would have been a most important witness. By reason of ...


2

The example Jesus cites, David getting the showbread, contains two authorities. One is King David over his men and the other is the high priest over the Bread of the Presence: So the priest gave him holy bread; for there was no bread there but the showbread which had been taken from before the LORD, in order to put hot bread in its place on the day when ...


2

Dr. Robert Chisolm, Jr., Professor of Old Testament, Dallas Theological Seminary, answered this VERY question in his article, “Cracks in the Foundation: Ominous Signs in the Davidic Narrative” (Bibliotheca Sacra, April-June 2016, pp. 154-176). That is, he addresses the moral aspects which led to the practical event of seeing Bathsheba from the roof of his ...


2

Your question seems to be "How is this possible?" as a question of total incredulity, that a godly man like David could fall into such a sin. I'll come back to this. Your next question is, "Why would a woman bathe before the king's royal palace or somewhere a king could see her?" She may have assumed that since the army was out to war, as was her husband ...


1

As @seedy3 already concluded, Abishag was a wife of King David, though he never had intercourse with her (1 King 1:1-4). But it would not have been adultery to marry the wife of King David in this case. David was already dead. It's even possible Salomon later took Abishag as his wife as the King's wifes were part of the crown posession. Lev 20:11 talks ...



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