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Leonard J Greenspoon, in 'Between Alexandria and Antioch: Jews and Judaism in the Hellenistic Period', published in The Oxford History of the Biblical World, page 322, describes the book of Daniel as a novel. As long as we see the book in this light, we can read into Daniel 9:24 whatever we believe the author intended, although we should be cautious of ...


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An edit above asked''"Edit: By asking if this is "good hermeneutics", I'm asking if rendering seventy weeks to mean 490 years is what the author meant (or in this case, what Gabriel meant). I'm also curious if there is anywhere else in the Bible where this type of day → year conversion occurs. Yes, there is another place where the day-year conversion ...


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Please allow me offer an answer that is different than you may have heard, but goes beyond what we can see outwardly and requires faith to see many things together from the "new" and the "old" as one. Have you noticed the following? In Daniel 2:1, exactly who had the dreams? Now in the second year of the reign of Nebuchadnezzar, Nebuchadnezzar ...


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The Idea in Brief The Jewish (and pre-Christian) understanding of the abomination of desolation was the desecration of the Jewish temple reconstructed by Zerubbabel. The abomination of desolation (or, with more literalness: the abomination of what precipitates the vacating [of holiness]) had the primary Jewish understanding through Antiochus IV Epiphanes, ...


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Here's an idea that came to me a while ago and perhaps could help: Some translations of Leviticus 20:13 qualify that act as "abomination." So, there's one of the words involved (at least according to some translations). As for that which "causes desolation:" Perhaps it is also connected to the lifestyle based on those acts (this last part is my personal ...



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