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8

The Daniel of the biblical book is דָּנִיֵּאל, while in Ezek 14:14 and 28:3 it is דָּנִאֵל and this has led to division of opinion among scholars as to the identification of this particular individual. Prior to more recent discoveries in the ruins of Ugarit that unearthed the "the Story of Aqht" and has led some scholars including Zimmerli to identify this ...


6

I will not specifically reference spelling differences, since names in Scripture often bear different spellings. While such could indicate a different person, it need not, so spelling difference alone is not enough to make a judgment one way or another about who the referent is. Regarding Daniel's Reputation Yes, Daniel was young. But if one follows the ...


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Remaining true to moasiac laws in matters regarding diet has always been a challeng for Jewish people residing in other lands. Consider: Tobit 1:10-12 After I was carried away captive to Assyria and came as a captive to Nineveh, everyone of my kindred and my people ate the food of the Gentiles, but I kept myself from eating the food of the ...


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When compared to the NT, it appears the allusion to the flood is a reference to the suddenness and completeness of the judgment, like a thief in the night. So either wording probably represents the same thing equally well. 2Pe 3:6 Whereby the world that then was, being overflowed with water, perished: 2Pe 3:7 But the heavens and the earth, which are ...


2

The phrase alone, "even if these men were in it," implies that these men are not in this hypothetical country. As you noted, Noah and Job were not Israelites. So Daniel would be out of place if he were an Israelite. However, this instance of Daniel (Dan'el) seems to be a reference to the legendary hero of wisdom featured in a late 2nd millennium myth from ...


2

These sections of scripture belong to a specific genre known as Apocalypse (lit. ἀποκάλυψις: uncovering), and so should be interpreted in line with the conventions of apocalyptic literature. That's not to say that the two are always directly analogic to one another, but rather that their form and conventions will be similar. Related reading Common features ...


1

Translation of this whole verse is a little problematic, as the aramaic ara appears as a noun both here in the middle of the verse and again at the end, again v29 from the NASB: "After you there will arise another kingdom inferior (ara) to you, then another third kingdom of bronze, which will rule over all the earth (ara)." Given the double usage of ...


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Most of Ezra and, interestingly, Daniel are written in the Aramaic. As far as I know, these are the only books in the Bible that are written in the Aramaic. Why? Why the shift from the Hebrew language to Aramaic? It dawned on me that this is an exile language, captivity language, the language of the enemy. The 70 year Exile was one of the major events of the ...



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