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Dan 12,12: לְיָמִ֕ים אֶ֕לֶף שְׁלֹ֥שׁ מֵאֹ֖ות שְׁלֹשִׁ֥ים וַחֲמִשָּֽׁה׃ Literally: to days thousand three hundreds thirty and five The KJV has “five and thirty” instead of “thirty and five” because this was the more common way to express compound numbers in 17th-century English. None of this has anything to do with lunar or solar calendars.


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Daniel 7:27 reads: ומלכותה ושלטנא ורבותא די מלכות תחות כל־שמיא יהיבת לעם קדישי עליונין מלכותה מלכות עלם וכל שלטניא לה יפלחון וישתמעון׃ First of all, this is not Hebrew but Aramaic. The third word from the end (in bold) is l-eh, with the suffix for the third person singular masculine. It could mean “to him” (that is: to the most high one), but since the ...


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The Idea in Brief The third person masculine references in the second half of Dan 7:27 allude to "the Most High." That is, the Masoretic accentuation points to "the Most High" as the exclusive antecedent in the second half of the verse. For the same reasons, the Masoretic accentuation provides for the logical elimination of "the nation (of the saints)" from ...


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The Idea in Brief The Jewish (and pre-Christian) understanding of the abomination of desolation was the desecration of the Jewish temple reconstructed by Zerubbabel. The abomination of desolation (or, with more literalness: the abomination of what precipitates the vacating [of holiness]) had the primary Jewish understanding through Antiochus IV Epiphanes, ...


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I'll take a moment to briefly answer since you stated a previous answer of mine elicited the question, and since by my hermeneutic, there is no problem asking a question such as yours on this site because part of understanding a text is understanding how it relates to other areas of Scripture that discuss similar topics (though you perhaps assume too much by ...


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First of all, the argument doesn't exist between the KJV and the NKJV, but between the NIV and all the other translations. The NIV IS a translation, and not a 'paraphrase', although biblical scholars(including Daniel Wallace) argue that ANY translation is a paraphrase, as idioms and meanings have to 'make sense' in the vernacular they are written in. Daniel ...


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The Idea in Brief The Book of Daniel appears in two chiasms: one in Aramaic and one in Hebrew. Both sets of chiasms appear to be parallel in content and meaning notwithstanding they are not in chronological order (and thus had made forming the chiasms easier to construct). The historian Josephus makes no mention of the Hebrew and Aramaic chiasms, but he ...


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Text critical perspective: The Four Kingdoms Sequence The concept of dividing the world into a sequence of four eras, and even associating those eras with four metals, did not originate with the book of Daniel. In the post-exilic period we find at least one Israelite text specifically using the same four metals in the same order for poetic or symbolic ...


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To answer this question, one must address an underlying presupposition: that somehow the 5 Kingdoms merely represent political entities that were destroyed(or replaced) with future ones. Hence, the conclusion is "it all leads up to Christ", and an arbitrary conclusion that it ends with the Destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, from which time we have entered ...


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Rashi, here, explains that in Daniel's vision, the horns of the goat represent Persia and Media, and the stars it stomps represents Israel. God, speaking to Abraham, also compared the children of Israel to the stars. See, e.g. Gen. 15:5. See also Deut. 1:10 ("the Lord your God hath multiplied you, and behold, ye are this day as the stars of heaven for ...


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This is the verse: "Dan 12:4 But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased." I think the point is being missed. Consider: What are we doing on this site and numerous other sites on the internet? (1) - I am learning from you and you are learning from me, ...


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Thank you Jack and Tau. I will now attempt to qualify my position and will start by acknowledging the definition of the word chronology as a listing of events that occur in order with respect to time. An event may be recorded first followed by the time-period or vice versa. Both methods of recording the chronology is employed in the text. I do not think any ...



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