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Daniel 7:27 reads: ומלכותה ושלטנא ורבותא די מלכות תחות כל־שמיא יהיבת לעם קדישי עליונין מלכותה מלכות עלם וכל שלטניא לה יפלחון וישתמעון׃ First of all, this is not Hebrew but Aramaic. The third word from the end (in bold) is l-eh, with the suffix for the third person singular masculine. It could mean “to him” (that is: to the most high one), but since the ...


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The Idea in Brief The third person masculine references in the second half of Dan 7:27 allude to "the Most High." That is, the Masoretic accentuation points to "the Most High" as the exclusive antecedent in the second half of the verse. For the same reasons, the Masoretic accentuation provides for the logical elimination of "the nation (of the saints)" from ...


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To answer this question, one must address an underlying presupposition: that somehow the 5 Kingdoms merely represent political entities that were destroyed(or replaced) with future ones. Hence, the conclusion is "it all leads up to Christ", and an arbitrary conclusion that it ends with the Destruction of the Temple in 70 AD, from which time we have entered ...


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Text critical perspective: The Four Kingdoms Sequence The concept of dividing the world into a sequence of four eras, and even associating those eras with four metals, did not originate with the book of Daniel. In the post-exilic period we find at least one Israelite text specifically using the same four metals in the same order for poetic or symbolic ...


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The Kingdoms as Often Understood The majority consensus would say: Babylon Media-Persia Greece Rome* The Reasoning The first is identified in the text, Nebuchadnezzar is called the head of gold in Daniel 2:38. Following this, the second and third Kingdom, would be the kingdom of the Medes and Persians, followed by the Greecian Empire, with Alexander ...



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