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10

Read in isolation, 2 Kings 4:38-41 can be understood as a story about a foul tasting soup that Elisha improved by adding a new flavor. However, the context in II Kings is miracles performed by Elisha to save people from death by famine. From within that context it seems that the "death in the pot," was an actual danger that required Elisha's intervention. ...


7

Using a Greek Lexicon, I was able to find that this same word is used in the Septuagint (LXX). This passage makes it seem that it is not offensive (Ecclesiasticus – Sirach): 27:4 As when one sifteth with a sieve, the refuse remaineth; so the filth of man in his talk. 27:4 ἐν σεισματι κοσκινου διαμενει κοπρια οὑτως σκυβαλα ἀνθρωπου ἐν λογισμω αὐτου ...


7

Suzerain covenants Modern contracts typically follow a certain format: the parties of the contract are identified, the terms and conditions are defined, certain penalties are defined, and the parties (and witnesses, if necessary) sign their agreement. There is a similarly formatted ancient Near Eastern contract, called a suzerain covenant, though these ...


6

No, it wasn't a necessary thing to do (in addition to the actual circumcision) because the LORD had not commanded Zipporah to do it. The action and her words ("You [Moses] are a bridegroom of blood to me") certainly had a symbolic meaning, though that meaning, however, may or may not have been derived from "an ancient marital relationship formula recalling ...


4

According to Ezekiel the prophet, the cities of the plain, which included Sodom and Gomorrah, were destroyed because of the neglect of the poor and needy (Ez 16:48-50). In other words, the events in the Book of Genesis regarding Sodom and Gomorrah occurred BEFORE the revelation of the ten commandments and other laws given through Moses. Thus there was some ...


3

I will answer your “Question 1”, as this is not addressed in the earlier question. In Classical Greek πιστεύω means “trust, put faith in, rely on” and takes an object in the dative or accusative; it is never (as far as I can see) construed with the prepositions ἐν or εἰς. This construction is, however, commonplace in LXX and NT, e.g. Ps. 77:22, where ὅτι ...


3

There were many situations where a first century Christian or Jew may have encountered meat sacrificed to idols. Meat was offered to idols before being served in temples’ dining halls (often as part of worship) or being used for communal meals; some of the meat served at the marketplace had been offered to idols. One who ate in a temple would know ...


3

I do not think that obscenities/profanities can be pigeon-holed. There is no point in figuring out if σκύβαλον is an obscenity. From one era the N word is acceptable and the next it is offensive. From one period calling someone a dyke is offensive but in recent years it is celebrated by those who accept a certain life-style. Is it considered offensive to ...


3

The word in Hebrew, verse 40, is maveth. It means death, as in pestilence. It is used in the Bible where death and destruction is conveyed as a meaning. It's not talking about bitterness. The message is, the prophet intervenes for these men due to Yahweh's mercy. Ref.: Gesenius's Lexicon of Hebrew and English and my knowledge of Hebrew.


3

Matthew 23.27-28 actually uses the term γραμματευς, which means 'scribes'. However, the Gospel writers use γραμματευς interchangeably with νομικος, meaning 'lawyers'. Compare Matthew 23.13-39 using 'scribes' with the parallel Luke 11.42-52 using 'lawyers'. More rarely this group is called νομοδιδασκαλος, which actually does mean 'teachers of the Law'. This ...


3

Yes the custom of raising the right hand was a customary gesture of a person taking an oath, implying that he appeals to God as a witness to the truth of his affirmation. From man to God: But Abram said to the king of Sodom, “With raised hand I have sworn an oath to the LORD, God Most High, Creator of heaven and earth, that I will accept nothing ...


2

Firstly, even if the reference to "right" is to the right arm as part of an oath, I'm not sure how one could conclude they raised the arm. Maybe they just held it sideways or against their body or some such. Most Hebrew commentaries (Radak, Ibn Ezra, Metsudat David) explain "right" to be metaphorical - the right being typically stronger than the left, ...


2

A wild gourd is just that. A gourd which grows in the wild. It would be difficult to say which species of gourd it might be though. "There was no more death in the pot" has also been translated "there was no more bitterness in the pot" or "there was no more harm in the pot". Starch, by my understanding, does have the ability to mitigate certain bitterness ...


2

Copied and pasted from http://www.gotquestions.org/hand-under-thigh.html The thigh was considered the source of posterity in the ancient world. Or, more properly, the “loins” or the testicles. The phrase “under the thigh” could be a euphemism for “on the loins.” There are two reasons why someone would take an oath in this manner: 1) Abraham had ...


2

There has been much argument as to whether the relevant word is correctly translated as 'lion' or 'pierced', because the Hebrew words (transliterated as kaari and kaaru) are almost indistinguishable. Both Christian and Jewish scholars have concluded that translating the passage with 'lion' (kaari) is meaningless and kaari is not supported by the earliest ...


2

Since the previous answer quoted Josephus, I would like to draw on this reference also: (Book XII, Chapt. 5:1 (Loeb 12:241) Antiquities of the Jews) And the sons of Tobias took the part of Menelaus, but the greater part of the people assisted Jason; and by that means Menelaus and the sons of Tobias were distressed, and retired to Antiochus, and ...


1

Question Restatement: According to Jewish Tradition, or Mosaic Law, what was happening at the 9th hour? Question Clarification: This is either in relationship to a general day of the week, (like Acts 3:1), or the Preparation Day of the Sabbath, or Sabbath Gadol -- and both answers are very different. Answer, Regarding Jewish Daily Prayers: (A.) ...


1

I find it difficult to understand why people would not read the Hebrew of the Bible at its face value: כי סבבוני כלבים for they turn-around me like dogs for they circumvent me like dogs עדת מרעים הקףוני gathering of companions they encircle me gathering of evil-doers they close-in on me כארי ידי ורגלי as lions of my hands and my feet as lights of my ...


1

The Essenes were a religious sect of Judaism, first appearing after the Hasmonean revolt, up through and during the time of Christ. You can find more about them here. Thus, for the Essenes, the physical act of immersion was insufficient in itself to render the individual fit for participation in community functions. The immersion had to be preceded ...


1

Theologian and author Michael J. Svigel, whom contributor Swasheck provided a hyperlink to (in a comment beneath OP's question), said it well: "We should embrace a translation that conveys the rhetorical effect intended by the author [my emphasis], as crass and base as it may seem to our perhaps overly-pious ears (cf. Eccl 7:16 ['Do not be excessively ...



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