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Genesis 2:5-7 actually shows a lack of any substantial passage of time. and every plant of the field before it was in the earth, and every herb of the field before it grew: for the Lord God had not caused it to rain upon the earth, and there was not a man to till the ground. -Genesis 2:5 (KJV) The emphasis is on the fact that nothing had grown as it ...


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Leon Kass' statements that "the second story is not just a magnified version of the human portions of the first", that "it is utterly distinct and independent", and that "we must scrupulously avoid reading into the second story any facts or notions taken from the first, and vice versa" are quite foolhardy. For if Kass would apply the same rules to ...


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Church Fathers who comment on Genesis 1:11-13 - Basil, Ephraim the Syrian, Gregory of Nyssa - maintain that the vegetation brought forth appeared whole and mature in one instant; it was not simply latent in seeds waiting to germinate. The translation of this passage chooses to render the underlying Hebrew word as "sprout", which implies that some kind of ...


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The question is conflating what are, in the view of nearly all critical scholars, two separate and independent accounts of creation. John J. Collins (The Bible After Babel, page 86) says a well-founded consensus of scholarship distinguishes two creation stories, the Priestly (P) one in Genesis 1:!-2:4a and the Yahwist (J) account in 2:4b-3:24. He says it ...


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According to an answer given by the author of this question, a couple of days had transpired: http://hermeneutics.stackexchange.com/a/23114/10231


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As noted elsewhere, Differences in Genesis creation stories the accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2 are commonly believed to have been written by different sources and as such should be considered in that light. However, if each record of events is examined taking what is described in the other into account, then the two can be combined into a single record ...


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Backdrop to explain my answer The opening chapters of Genesis provides an interesting framework for understanding the rest of the Bible. That is, the creation narrative of chapters 1-2 includes, within its own framework, the introduction of creation, and a "new" creation. That sounds confusing so let me explain. In Genesis 1 we're given an account of the ...


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In the view of modern scholarship this question should be restated: Was woman created on the same day as Adam? “Eve” is a name given at the end of Genesis 3. It is not part of the Genesis 2 record, “woman” is. Also the author of Genesis 2 describes the creation of “Adam.” "Man" is found in Genesis 2:24 in the context of two being one flesh. Setting ...


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In The Beginning of Wisdom: Reading Genesis, Leon R. Kass looks at whether there really are two different accounts in Genesis 1 and Genesis 2. On pages 55-57, Kass discusses the main differences between chapter 1 and chapter 2, and concludes the second story is not just a magnified version of the human portions of the first. He says it is utterly distinct ...


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If this question is answered with the knowledge of God found in Scripture the answer is no, the woman was not an afterthought. An all-knowing God does not have an afterthought during His work of creation (or any other time). Genesis 1 makes clear creating man and woman was a planned action. Nevertheless, it is commonly accepted among contemporary scholars ...


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I believe Genesis 1:1 says... בראשית (In first [there is no definite article, just like John 1:1]) ברא (prepares) אלהים (the gods) את (a-z) השמים (the heavens/space) ואת (and a-z) הארץ׃ (the land/matter) This seems to say that there was something called "the first" which prepared all things. The only thing I've been able to come up with is that ...


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It is clear that the creation of Eve was an afterthought. It is only after God has taken Adam and put him in the Garden, and after he has given Adam instructions to look after the Garden, told him what he can eat but not to eat of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, that God decides to create company for Adam: Genesis 2:15-18: And the LORD God ...


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There is no suggestion that the ancient Hebrews believed in the fire-breathing dragons of medieval lore, but they did believe in supernatural monsters loosely described as 'chaos monsters'. These were mythological creatures that inhabit creation stories and had to be defeated in order to bring order to the world. Behemoth literally means 'great beast' and ...


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in my understanding, the "water" was created in the beginning together with heaven and earth(heaven, earth includincluding water). Because, After this verse we did not read any verse that God said " let there be a water" or that said "God created water"


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It seems the story of temptation can only be explained in one of three ways: a talking snake, Satan disguised as a snake, or the whole story was a creation of man. Snakes are physically and intellectually incapable of speech, yet the biblical serpent was certainly not Satan. For Satan to have used the serpent means that Satan was able to deceive God, because ...


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God made Adam male and female, as attested twice, so Eve is not the first woman but something else female that helps them. I suggest that Eve is the paraclete that Jesus aims to replace -- as a "new" or "another" paraclete John (14:15-27). What other helper or comforter might Jesus have been refering to, other than Eve? The etympological origin of Paraclete ...


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I would point out that the Hebrew text lends itself to the translation "rib." The text in Genesis 2:21 literally reads, "And he [the Lord God] took one ['aḥat] from his side [miṭṭela'] and he closed the flesh after them [taḥtennah]." The "one" would suggest a part of the side, and the "after them" (with a feminine plural suffix) would suggest that the one ...


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CHRIST (ALPHA AND OMEGA): The Spirit of God from the Beginning If we are to understand what "image" means in Genesis 1:26-27, to begin, it is for us to know that the Bible's Creation is unique. Where all other creation narratives rely on allusion and allegory to establish their traditions, which is not unlike what Scripture employs. The difference in what ...



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