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10

Short Answer: No. This is a great question, and I'm glad you asked it. This verse is often used by Christian apologists to show that the Bible was ahead of its times in its scientific claims. While this sounds convincing to modern readers of English translations, it is a very poor argument to use. Exhibit A: The word "stretch" To many, the idea of God ...


10

Interesting question! I'm not sure it admits of a definitive answer, but some observations suggest one possibility. As noted by OP, the typical divine response to each day's acts of creation tends to be "impersonal": וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים כִּי־טוֹב wayyarʾ ĕlōhîm kî-ṭôb and God saw that [it was] good This is the response in Gen 1:10, 12, 18, 21, and ...


9

Good question. While no state of maturity for Adam and Eve at creation is ever explicitly stated in the Bible, there are some texts where we can infer something about their state. Adam is created to work the garden and care for it (Genesis 2:15). He then names the animals (Genesis 2:19, 20). This is not something that an infant could do. Adam and Eve are ...


7

My question is: Is there a place in Scripture from which we can draw a dogmatic conclusion as to whether Adam was created as a fully developed man, or as a new born babe? Based on the nature of the literary genre of Genesis, and comparisons of Gen.1-3 with other origin stories of ancient near eastern literature I would say the answer to your ...


5

The view one takes on the credibility of the assertion is going to depend largely on one's presuppositions and level of allowance for the Bible text to speak for itself. If the Torah (Law, i.e. "teaching" is the idea in Hebrew, not just the actual commands and prohibitions), which includes Genesis, was formed contra what critical scholars claim, and instead ...


5

Assuming a literal reading of the text (which is how the hermeneutic I hold takes Genesis), then in one 24 hour period, the 6th day of creation, Adam (and by extension on some of the points, Eve) was:1 Made fully capable of understanding language, as God spoke to them (Gen 1:28; cf. Gen 2:15-17) Made fully capable of sexual reproduction to multiply on the ...


5

Note: Since some gap theory arguments rely on phrasing in the King James, I will be quoting from the KJV unless otherwise noted. All verses will be examined in the KJV, other versions will be listed if they correct or add to the discussion. The Gap Theory, sometimes called the Ruin and Reconstruction Theory of creation, postulates that an unspecified amount ...


4

John Gill (1) says about two places, a field near Damascus and the Mount Moriah: some say it was a field near Damascus; the Targum of Jonathan is, “he went and dwelt in Mount Moriah, to till the ground out of which he was created;” and so other Jewish writers say (F16), the gate of paradise was near Mount Moriah, and there Adam dwelt ...


4

The Idea in Brief When viewed through the lens of Jewish tradition, the suggested literal translation of the verse would appear as follows: Gen 2:12 And gold of the land is good: there [one finds] the yellow and the red stone. The second clause (after the colon) would modify and expand upon the first clause. In this regard, the Babylonian Talmud ...


4

This theory is pretty credible. There a great deal of scholars which entertain this idea who are collectively known as Panbabylonists. This seems to raise the ire of many purists who would like to believe that Genesis was influenced by God alone. In my opinion, however many fail to consider the idea that perhaps sections of Genesis were not derived from ...


4

Some argue that Job 40:15:24 mentions Behemoth and Leviathan and that these are dinosaurs, however radiometric dating indicates that most or all dinosaurs died out millions of years before Job. On the other hand, Technically Crocodiles are Dinosaurs so the answer is "all of them." It is also possible that the Leviathan is a Plesiosaur and this dinosaur ...


3

With any theory like this its just as credible that the influence goes the other way. The argument that the Sumerians could not influence the Hebrews directly is bunk, in that perhaps they could not directly influence the author of Genesis, but since they would have been contemporary with Abraham they could have influenced the stream of Hebrew thought at an ...


3

Short Answer: Based on the textual evidence, it may not be a third usage, but in fact the same as the second usage. In other words, the land (as opposed to the waters or heavens) was formless and void. There are two key pieces of evidence from the text that support this conclusion: Gen. 1:2 does not merely say the earth was formless and void, but also ...


3

What these verses imply is that, whatever “image of God” implies, sex is irrelevant. In the Jewish view, since God has no physical form at all, it is meaningless to speak of His sex. The various Hebrew words that translate as “God” all have masculine grammatical gender. (The word for “spirit”, ruach, has feminine gender though, so the “spirit of God” which ...


3

The word שָׁמָיִם is always plural in Hebrew; there is no singular. (We call this a plurale tantum). Gen. 1:8 has שָׁמָיִם without the article and the next verse has the same word with the definite article. You can translate it literally as “heavens”, or you can paraphrase it with the English singular “heaven”. But to translate it as “heaven” in one verse ...


3

The Garden of Eden is said to be eastward, in Eden Genesis (2:8); Eastward appears to be either the direction toward the garden, from where the writer of the text was, at the time he wrote it, or the direction God moved from, when he placed Adam into the garden, after creating him. We might assume, God was in Eden, when He created Adam, and could assume He ...


3

The Idea in Brief From the perspective of the Hebrew Bible, there are three apparent reasons why there is a “gap” of indefinite time between Gen 1:1 and Gen 1:2. Discussion First, the Hebrew Scriptures indicate that the Lord did not create the earth formless and void. The word for “create” (בָּרָא) in the following verse is the same word for “create” ...


2

God is laying the foundation for the definition of a day. Notice the flow and progression of the text. Darkness (v.2) - Light had not been created, God creates light (v.3), God sees (of course He already knew) the light is good, God separates the light from darkness (He creates distinction), God names light and darkness (v.5) which defines a day, and then ...


2

The Cosmic Temple Among others, both John Walton (Genesis 1 as Ancient Cosmology) and G.K. Beale (The Temple and the Church's Mission) argue that the cosmos and Eden are constructed in Genesis 1-2 in terminology fitting of a temple. Beale in an article titled, "Eden, The Temple, And The Church's Mission In The New Creation", elaborates at least nine points ...


2

I also think (as in the previous comment) that it is meaningless to speak of the gender of God And it is unwise, in many cases, to try and equate grammatical gender with actual gender. The word for "spirit" is grammatically feminine in the Hebrew, and grammatically neuter in the Greek, but this tells us nothing at all about the actual gender of the Holy ...


2

As modern day Westerners, we forget that middle-easterners from 2 to 5 thousand years ago had a very different picture of the universe. Reading the Enûma Eliš and Eridu Genesis are very revealing in this regard. Here is a pictographic representation of what these people from long ago would have envisioned the universe: When reading Genesis one, is is most ...


1

The Idea in Brief There was an indefinite gap of time between Gen 1:1 and Gen 1:2, in which the prehistoric dinosaurs existed. The picture of salvation in the Christian New Testament suggests that the seven days of creation were seven days of restoration, when the earth was "born again." Therefore the seven days of creation in Genesis describe the ...


1

You have a very interesting question, David. I am not an expert but only a continuing student of the scripture. My answer is solely based on the light of my understanding of other clear verses of scripture. Ge 1:1 In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. NKJV Ex 20:11 11 For in six days the LORD made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and ...


1

The creation account in Genesis is describing cosmic events in terms that ordinary men and women could understand. It is best taken as a straightforward historical account of the events of creation. If this is the case, then the first day began at the start, the beginning. It couldn't start at the end of the day because this was the beginning of time. The ...


1

Genesis 1:1-2, in fact, can be equally translated in two ways; by taking the Hebrew word 'b-reishit' either as a 'construct' or in the 'absolute'. This fact, in itself, renders the possibility of translating the first two verses (Gensis 1:1-2) into two strikingly different but equally valid translations. These two equally valid translations in turn give us ...


1

The NET Bible notes address this question directly, spelling out the two alternative interpretations: sn In the beginning. The verse refers to the beginning of the world as we know it; it affirms that it is entirely the product of the creation of God. But there are two ways that this verse can be interpreted: (1) It may be taken to refer to the original ...


1

This was always a fascinating thing for me, the creation of light. Gen 1:3 (KJV) And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. The best explanation for me of what light is, is what we now call the electromagnetic spectrum. At this stage only the ability for the existence of light was made, there was no energy to to make darkness or light, ...



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