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10

Short Answer: No. This is a great question, and I'm glad you asked it. This verse is often used by Christian apologists to show that the Bible was ahead of its times in its scientific claims. While this sounds convincing to modern readers of English translations, it is a very poor argument to use. Exhibit A: The word "stretch" To many, the idea of God ...


10

Interesting question! I'm not sure it admits of a definitive answer, but some observations suggest one possibility. As noted by OP, the typical divine response to each day's acts of creation tends to be "impersonal": וַיַּרְא אֱלֹהִים כִּי־טוֹב wayyarʾ ĕlōhîm kî-ṭôb and God saw that [it was] good This is the response in Gen 1:10, 12, 18, 21, and ...


5

I think the key to translating Genesis 1:2 is not וְר֣וּחַ (we·ruach, "spirit"), but rather מְרַחֶ֖פֶת (me·rachepheth, "moved"). Better understanding the verb will help us better understand the subject. rachaph (the root) is a rare verb. It occurs just three times in the Old Testament: here, Deuteronomy 32:11: Like an eagle that stirs up its nest, ...


5

Note: Since some gap theory arguments rely on phrasing in the King James, I will be quoting from the KJV unless otherwise noted. All verses will be examined in the KJV, other versions will be listed if they correct or add to the discussion. The Gap Theory, sometimes called the Ruin and Reconstruction Theory of creation, postulates that an unspecified amount ...


4

John Gill (1) says about two places, a field near Damascus and the Mount Moriah: some say it was a field near Damascus; the Targum of Jonathan is, “he went and dwelt in Mount Moriah, to till the ground out of which he was created;” and so other Jewish writers say (F16), the gate of paradise was near Mount Moriah, and there Adam dwelt ...


4

The Idea in Brief When viewed through the lens of Jewish tradition, the suggested literal translation of the verse would appear as follows: Gen 2:12 And gold of the land is good: there [one finds] the yellow and the red stone. The second clause (after the colon) would modify and expand upon the first clause. In this regard, the Babylonian Talmud ...


4

The Idea in Brief From the perspective of the Hebrew Bible, there are three apparent reasons why there is a “gap” of indefinite time between Gen 1:1 and Gen 1:2. Discussion First, the Hebrew Scriptures indicate that the Lord did not create the earth formless and void. The word for “create” (בָּרָא) in the following verse is the same word for “create” ...


4

The Hebrew word for man is אָדָם (adam) or אּישׁ (ish). The "out of man" (מֵאִ֖ישׁ meish, also transliterated me’iysh) in this passage derives from the latter form. Like in Gen 2:23, ish often carries a definite connection with males (as opposed to "mankind"), but has a variety of uses. You can explore the usage of all forms of ish here and meish here. ...


3

The Garden of Eden is said to be eastward, in Eden Genesis (2:8); Eastward appears to be either the direction toward the garden, from where the writer of the text was, at the time he wrote it, or the direction God moved from, when he placed Adam into the garden, after creating him. We might assume, God was in Eden, when He created Adam, and could assume He ...


3

The Hebrews reads הָֽאָדָ֖ם note the article הָֽ ('the') before אָדָם ('man', 'mankind', 'Adam'). Going back to Gen 1:27 we read: So God created man ( אֶת־הָֽאָדָם֙ )in His own image; in the image of God He created him; male and female He created them. ( NKJ) Notice that it is exactly the same term "the man" in both cases (though this is obscured ...


2

The Cosmic Temple Among others, both John Walton (Genesis 1 as Ancient Cosmology) and G.K. Beale (The Temple and the Church's Mission) argue that the cosmos and Eden are constructed in Genesis 1-2 in terminology fitting of a temple. Beale in an article titled, "Eden, The Temple, And The Church's Mission In The New Creation", elaborates at least nine points ...


2

Revelation 22:5 Mentions that God is the source of light in heaven: There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. This indicates that it is possible for God himself to be a source of light. When God said "Let there be light" in Genesis 1:3, he doesn't specify a ...


2

God is laying the foundation for the definition of a day. Notice the flow and progression of the text. Darkness (v.2) - Light had not been created, God creates light (v.3), God sees (of course He already knew) the light is good, God separates the light from darkness (He creates distinction), God names light and darkness (v.5) which defines a day, and then ...


1

Yes.God created the angels.It is written," Who maketh his angels spirits; his ministers a flaming fire"(Psalm 104:4). The heavenly host were created by God through his Spirit and Word as it is written: Psalm 148:1-5 By the word of the LORD were the heavens made; and all the host of them by the breath of his mouth. Psalm 148:1-5 1 ...


1

Genesis 1:1-2, in fact, can be equally translated in two ways; by taking the Hebrew word 'b-reishit' either as a 'construct' or in the 'absolute'. This fact, in itself, renders the possibility of translating the first two verses (Gensis 1:1-2) into two strikingly different but equally valid translations. These two equally valid translations in turn give us ...


1

This was always a fascinating thing for me, the creation of light. Gen 1:3 (KJV) And God said, Let there be light: and there was light. The best explanation for me of what light is, is what we now call the electromagnetic spectrum. At this stage only the ability for the existence of light was made, there was no energy to to make darkness or light, ...



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