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The evidence strongly suggests that when New Testament authors refer to scripture, or say "it is written", they are referring to pre-Christian Jewish sacred writings and not what is now the New Testament. The one possible exception is the author of 2 Peter. (I hesitate to say "Hebrew Bible" for three reasons. First, most of them use the Septuagint ...


5

In Psa. 100:1, the psalmist commands, "All the earth, shout to Yahveh!" Hence, the subject is "all the earth" (כָּל הָאָרֶץ) (cp. Psa. 33:8, 66:4, 96:1, 96:9, etc.). To the same subject, "all the earth," the psalmist commands (Psa. 100:2), "Serve Yahveh with gladness!" (עִבְדוּ אֶת יַהְוֶה בְּשִׂמְחָה) and "Come in His presence with exultation!" (בֹּאוּ ...


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Abstract Paul is making an argument in Galatians that the Gentiles are recipients of God's promise to Abraham via Jesus. The "Old Covenant" is "old" because it has been replaced by the prior covenant. Similarly, the "New Covenant" was given to Abraham first, but only implemented in Christ later. The timeline is: Abram received the promise off ...


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This question is interesting in its own right, but all the more so in light of John's pronouncement in Matthew 3:9 that God is able from stones to raise up children for Abraham. One way we might understand the argument in Exodus 32 is to note that Moses does not ask God to remember his promise so much as to remember his servants to whom he made the promise. ...


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Several things helpful to understanding this: The usage of new in the Bible. It often does not indicate an absolute ontological break with what preceded. A self-explanatory example: [Your mercies] are new every morning; great is your faithfulness. —Lamentations 3:23 Covenant Theology. This is the reason why I had not yet given an answer to this ...


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The law clearly states for most of the nations mentioned in Ezra 9 and 10 that the marriage is illegal (compare the law in Deuteronomy 7:3 to Ezra's own description of the transgression in Ezra 9:12). The response in Ezra 10:3 states explicitly that they will break the marriage covenants "by the law". The marriages never had a legal footing, and are ...


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You are correct in noting that His promises to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob could have been fulfilled through Moses. However, consider verses 11-12. Moses points to two aspects of the Exodus that would be affected by a rejection of Israel: God demonstrated His mighty power in bringing out the Israelites from Egypt. This would effectively be wasted effort on ...


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In v32, after he has been down to witness the sin and returned, Moshe tells God "if you will not forgive them, wipe me out too". Perhaps he had this in mind earlier; he'd already resolved that he wouldn't consent to being the new Avraham if the Israelites were not found worthy to continue? Please note: This answer was written for a neutral, academic ...


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Abraham, at Gen. 22: 16-17 is promised that his descendants would be blessed with an "exceeding multiplication of his seed like the stars of the heaven and the sand upon the seashore." Previously, at Gen. 13:16, God promised Abraham that his posterity would be as numerous "as the dust of the earth." Rabbi Mendel Weinbach writes about this: "Sand, dust ...


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This is clear use of hyperbole. Jesus makes use of similar hyperbole in the sermon on the mount (Matthew 5:21-48) in which he instructs us to cut out our eyes if we even look lustfully at a woman or cut off our hand if we stumble. He doesn't mean this literally, but is using hyperbole to emphasize his point. Likewise, here we have an over-emphasis to drive ...


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What is interesting is that before attending the Last Supper, "Satan entered Judas" (Luke 22:3). Jesus knew that Satan had implanted the betrayal in the heart of Judas (John 13:2), and proceeded to wash the feet of Judas anyway. Then again before the Last Supper ended, "Satan entered Judas" (Jn 13:27). So what is puzzling is why someone who was possessed by ...


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2Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive.3Yea, better [is he] than both they, which hath not yet been, who hath not seen the evil work that is done under the sun.(Eccl. 3:2-3) The author(Solomon) is declaring that "better is the one who is dead, than the one who is yet to be born to see the ...


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In Exodus 6:7, along with Jeremiah 30:22, the Lord is the one addressing others (via "I"). He is speaking to his chosen people. Exodus 6:7 And I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I am the LORD your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians. Jeremiah 30:22 And ye shall be my ...


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"But you must continue in the things which you have learned and been assured of, knowing from whom you have learned them" refers in part to the "new revelation" Paul shared with Timothy, his son in the faith, so no, the OT (Tanakh) was not the only Scripture in Paul's day, and the word Scripture(s) in 2 Timothy 3:16 is not a reference to only the OT ...



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