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Revelation 22:5 Mentions that God is the source of light in heaven: There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. This indicates that it is possible for God himself to be a source of light. When God said "Let there be light" in Genesis 1:3, he doesn't specify a ...


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I think you may be reading this passage without its' goal in mind. The point of the creation story is not to record the exact scientific sequence of creation in a journalistic manner - but instead to teach the people of Israel an important lesson about God. This is not a recipe for creation with the exact ingredients, measurements and baking instructions for ...


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6 day creationists would say that your assertion that the light of the first day was figurative has nothing going for it. Indeed, I'd like to hear what arguments you have for that. In any case, if the days were approximately as long as our days, plants can survive for one day in darkness.


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For those of us who take the first creation account in Genesis (Genesis 1:1-2:4a) literally, every apparent contradiction has an explanation. Perhaps not one that will satisfy the scientist or the sceptic, but one that will satisfy the believer. Simply put, God chose to create another light source on day 1, in verse 1:3, and chose to have it darken on a ...


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To summarise: On the one hand we have the evidence of Stephen's speech and the vuv consecutive (or consecutive preterite) וַיֹּאמֶר of Genesis 12:1. On the other hand, we have the arithmetic demonstrating that Abram left Haran before his father died. If one wishes to reconcile these, it is really very simple. The vuv consecutive is in some versions ...


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Acts 7 New International Version (NIV) Stephen’s Speech to the Sanhedrin "7 Then the high priest asked Stephen, “Are these charges true?” 2 To this he replied: “Brothers and fathers, listen to me! The God of glory appeared to our father Abraham while he was still in Mesopotamia, before he lived in Harran. 3 ‘Leave your country and your people,’ God said, ...


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Because the writer of the Exodus passage believed it, and the writer of the Genesis passages believed differently. While scholars continue to debate its exact shape, source criticism – in Documentary, Supplementary, Fragmentary, or other form – continues to be among the most helpful tools for examining apparent inconsistencies of exactly this sort in the ...


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No, do not think that there is a contradiction because these passages are not speaking of the same day historically or allegorically. Amos was speaking specifically to the house of Israel, the house of Joseph, the northern kingdom of the ten tribes if Israel. (Amos 5) He was writing before their captivity by the Assyrians. Israel's "day" of judgment was ...


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The problem verse is not John 3:13-14. At the time this conversation was supposed to have taken place the OT saints were still supposedly waiting in sheol to be saved because Jesus had not yet died and released them. Thus, the problem verse is actually 2 K 2:11 which specifically says the whirlwind took Elijah into "heaven" (shamayim). Jesus also speaks of ...


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The morning star is the planet Venus, thought to be so beautiful that pagans associated it with the goddess Venus. It is natural that in Revelation 22:16 Jesus compares himself to the most admired star in the universe. Scholars say that Isaiah chapter 14 refers to the king of Babylon, who laid the nations low (Isaiah 14:12). Isaiah talks of the king's pomp ...


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In verses 24-27 Saul is trying to get Samuel and the Lord to forgive him. But it's pointless, the Lord has already made up His mind. IMO, Samuel is explaining that the Glory of Israel isn't into game playing, neither bluff, lying or catering to Saul's vacilations. He's helping Saul to accept the new situation. God's decision to uncrown Saul is the ...



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