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The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


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Let's read back a bit in Matthew 16 starting at verse 13(ESV): 13 Now when Jesus came into the district of Caesarea Philippi, he asked his disciples, “Who do people say that the Son of Man is?” 14 And they said, “Some say John the Baptist, others say Elijah, and others Jeremiah or one of the prophets.” 15 He said to them, “But who do you say ...


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No contradiction There is not really anything contradictory about stating it this way just because Christ is understood to be pre-existent.1 This can be understood looking at it from two perspectives. Human Perspective You make the statement: I would never say "I foreknow my son" if he is sitting next to me. Yet I believe you can imagine a scenario ...


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The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...


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The two records need not be seen as incompatible: Be diligent to present yourself approved to God, a worker who does not need to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of truth. (2 Timothy 2:15 NKJV) It is a matter of belief. If one chooses to believe both records are completely factual, then simply look for the places where the records need to be ...


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Each gospel writer put in those things which further and advance the conclusion to which he is heading toward. Of importance to Matthew is the royal line coming down from king David. Jesus must have a royal bloodline so David is mentioned 6 times in chap. 1. In MATT.1:1 David is mentioned before Abraham who fathered the nation of Israel. This shows Jesus ...


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Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 7, that the nativity accounts in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are, with respect to time, place, and circumstances, a collection of legends. She says (page 11) Luke wants to make the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem plausible by fabricating the story of the census. But since he handles the facts ...


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Paul is actually defending himself here in this second letter to the Corinthians. In this passage when he says "us" he is meaning the people that he has been ministering to as well as the Corinthians, but when he gets to that last line So then, death is at work in us, but life is at work in you, he is telling them, almost forcefully, that they are not alone ...


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One way to approach apparent contradictions is to take the Scripture literally: But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up. Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, ...



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