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1

Whether Haman was a descendant of King Agag whom Saul was suppose to kill or not we really don't know but in 1 Chronicles 4:43 (around 300 yrs after Samuel had killed Agag) it says that 'they defeated the rest of the Amelekites who had escaped'. So it could have been possible that Haman was a descendant of King Agag but no real way to prove it.


2

Since I given have Alan a bit of a hard time, I feel somewhat obligated to provide an answer. :) Context Like all passages, the key to understanding Exodus 32:26-29 is to look at the broader context. In the previous chapters of Exodus, Moses has lead the Israelites out of Egypt through a series of miraculous events. He has now gone up Mount Sinai to get ...


0

The Scripture says: then Moses stood in the entrance of the camp, and said, “Whoever is on the LORD’s side—come to me!”... (Exodus 32:26 NKJV) The offer was made to everyone. The resulting action and message is straightforward. If you are for the LORD, come to Him. At some point all people have to decide: whose side are you on? No one should be ...


-2

Perhaps, you need to read the Hebrew of Exodus 32:25 - 29. Abandon all existing doctrine and interpretation. Read it like your friend wrote you an email. Don't care what "experts" have commented. Just read the Hebrew plainly without religious allegiance. You will notice there is no imperative, no incompletion verb, among the verbs that concern you. You ...


3

The Idea in Brief Eli had done nothing to "tone down" his sons, or to mitigate their behavior. So while on the one hand he had rebuked them in Chapter 2, there is nothing in the text to suggest that he had done anything from that time onward to mitigate their behavior, which is the observation in Chapter 3. Later in the book, Samuel himself comes to have ...


4

Eli's Failure Somewhat regardless of whether the word כָּהָה (kāhâ) should mean "rebuke" or "restrain," at the point which the sons refused to obey their father Eli (1 Sam 2:25), Eli should have had his sons killed on the basis of two, and possibly three points of the Law (quotes from NASB): Dishonoring God's Law—Lev 3 and Lev 4 with Num 15:30-311 ...


1

The Amalekites represent the forces of evil in the world. This explains why they must be fought in each generation. It also explains the ferocity of the hatred shown to the Amalekites in the Bible. In the Book of Esther, for instance, we learn that Haman was a direct descendant of Agag, King of the Amalekites. This same Haman was plotting the destruction of ...


2

Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


2

The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...



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