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7

There are several possible explanations. Your specific belief about the correctness of the Bible or its original sources may limit you to a certain set of these. Paul made a mistake. Chapter 9 describes Paul's encounter. Chapter 22 describes Paul describing the encounter. He mispoke or misremembered or offered his own incorrect understanding of his ...


6

Not All Speech was Removed The Muting Declared and Defined Ezekiel's muting is recorded in chapter 3, verse 26 (NKJV): I will make your tongue cling to the roof of your mouth, so that you shall be mute and not be one to rebuke them, for they are a rebellious house. But the very next verse (v.27) indicates that this muting is not full (emphasis ...


5

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


4

The Idea in Brief The Greek verb ἀκούω means to hear and/or to understand. Discussion In the Greek New Testament, the verb ἀκούω means to hear and/or to understand. For example, in the following verse people can "hear" the voice but they cannot "understand" what the voice is saying. 1 Cor 14:2 (mGNT) 2 ὁ γὰρ λαλῶν γλώσσῃ οὐκ ἀνθρώποις λαλεῖ ἀλλὰ ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


3

Yes, only after Gen 9:3 did God expressed clearly that human may eat meat after they took the life of the animal. Though we can argue that the violent-ness of mankind on Noah's time (Gen 6) included some bloody deeds, like gulping down living animal. Still, it is reasonable to concludes that Adam and family ate only vegetables, as God also ordered him of ...


3

As the judgment was against all those counted in the census commentaries that I have consulted strictly assume the judgment was literally agains only these 'men' excluding the Levites. I think there is not much to add from what you have already listed except one item. The census counted those where were 'able to fight', i.e. men over twenty, not from the ...


3

Synchronisms between the reigns of the northern and southern kingdoms (Israel and Judah) are all affected by an apparent discrepancy of a few years. The case of Joash’s 23rd year is particularly affected, but the basic reason is the same as other kings. It relates to whether a kingdom uses the 'accessional' or 'non-accessional' method of dating. In both ...


2

To summarise: On the one hand we have the evidence of Stephen's speech and the vuv consecutive (or consecutive preterite) וַיֹּאמֶר of Genesis 12:1. On the other hand, we have the arithmetic demonstrating that Abram left Haran before his father died. If one wishes to reconcile these, it is really very simple. The vuv consecutive is in some versions ...


2

While Joseph's answer has much to commend it, I feel it is headed in the wrong direction. I don't think there is a need to suppose two sets of Abiathars and Ahimelechs where one is father-son and the other vice versa. First, 1 Kings 2:26-27 is clear that it was indeed the so-called "good" Abiathar it's talking about since verse 27 notes that his life was ...


2

Because the writer of the Exodus passage believed it, and the writer of the Genesis passages believed differently. While scholars continue to debate its exact shape, source criticism – in Documentary, Supplementary, Fragmentary, or other form – continues to be among the most helpful tools for examining apparent inconsistencies of exactly this sort in the ...


2

Talmud answers the seeming "contradictions" between Numbers and Deuteronomy. The rabbis indicated that the Lord had commanded Moses "to send for himself" (that is, for Moses) the spies into the land. The Talmud mentions Deut 1:23, when Moses indicates that sending the spies had pleased him (that is, not God, but Moses). The following citation comes from ...


2

Regardless of whether Moses initiated the idea of sending spies onto Canaan or whether he did so at God's command, Moses was in practice the one who sent the spies. However, Numbers 13:17b-20, authorship of which is generally attributed to the Yahwist Source, is closer to Deuteronomy 1:21-23 than is Numbers 13:1-17a, in which (Numbers 13:1-2) God told Moses ...


2

And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because thou hast hearkened to my voice." Genesis 22:18 LXX kai eneuloghqhsontai en tw spermati sou panta ta eqnh ths ghs anq¢ wn uphkousas ths emhs fwnhs Note the use of the singular seed (spermati) Paul probably has in mind the LXX translation of the verse . Anyway, offspring can be understood ...


2

The OP presents two arguments used by some in the issue of Elijah being or not taken to heaven. @gutenburgb have already addressed the second one and I'll address the first one. The original verb for the quoted "no man hath ascended up to heaven" (KJV Joh 3.13) is ἀναβέβηκεν, which is the perfect active indicative of ἀναβαίνω, to go up, to ascend, acc. to ...


2

From my study I have come to the conclusion that Elijah wrote the "writing" before he was taken to heaven. It seems pretty clear that by "the prophet Elijah" the writer of Chronicles is not referring to a different Elijah. The Hebrew word miktab (translated "a writing") is also used in 2 Chron. 35:4 which says: And prepare yourselves by the houses of ...


2

Elijah may have been "relocated" by the Lord. This would explain several things. First, as you mentioned, the likelihood of the Elijah mentioned in 2 Chronicles, someone who would have been in the natural life span of Elijah, is significant. The writer of the Kings and Chronicles was either the same person (presumably Jeremiah), or they relied heavily on the ...


2

No Peter does not contradict Amos 2 Peter 3:10-12 "But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night, in which the heavens will pass away with a great noise, and the elements will melt with fervent heat; both the earth and the works that are in it will be burned up. Therefore, since all these things will be dissolved, what manner of persons ought ...


2

With questions like this it is always better to compare the NT with LXX, where you are at least dealing with the same language. The LXX of the Amos passage reads: οὐαὶ οἱ ἐπιθυμοῦντες τὴν ἡμέραν κυρίου As you can see, the verb is different in the two passages. If the author of 2 Peter had intended to contradict Amos one would have expected him to mirror ...


2

Revelation 22:5 Mentions that God is the source of light in heaven: There will be no more night. They will not need the light of a lamp or the light of the sun, for the Lord God will give them light. This indicates that it is possible for God himself to be a source of light. When God said "Let there be light" in Genesis 1:3, he doesn't specify a ...


2

In Gen 10:8-10 we read: Cush begot Nimrod; he began to be a mighty one on the earth. He was a mighty hunter before the LORD; therefore it is said, "Like Nimrod the mighty hunter before the LORD." And the beginning of his kingdom was Babel, Erech, Accad, and Calneh, in the land of Shinar.[NKJV] Notice that we are told that the kingdom of Nimrod ...


2

Genesis 11 is going back and detailing a story that clarifies Genesis 10. Why so many languages? In Genesis 10:5, 20 and 31 we are told that the descendents of each of Noah's sons moved on, "each with his own language, by their clans, in their nations." All being from the same family it would seem odd that they each had their own language so quickly. ...


1

The morning star is the planet Venus, thought to be so beautiful that pagans associated it with the goddess Venus. It is natural that in Revelation 22:16 Jesus compares himself to the most admired star in the universe. Scholars say that Isaiah chapter 14 refers to the king of Babylon, who laid the nations low (Isaiah 14:12). Isaiah talks of the king's pomp ...


1

No, do not think that there is a contradiction because these passages are not speaking of the same day historically or allegorically. Amos was speaking specifically to the house of Israel, the house of Joseph, the northern kingdom of the ten tribes if Israel. (Amos 5) He was writing before their captivity by the Assyrians. Israel's "day" of judgment was ...


1

Even conservative theologians acknowledge that Luke was not with Paul on the road to Damascus so, if Luke was the author of Acts, he must have received all three versions from Paul, or at least one version that he subsequently amended for his own reasons and placed in three different contexts. Rex Wyler says,in The Jesus Sayings, page 43, that historians ...


1

The problem verse is not John 3:13-14. At the time this conversation was supposed to have taken place the OT saints were still supposedly waiting in sheol to be saved because Jesus had not yet died and released them. Thus, the problem verse is actually 2 K 2:11 which specifically says the whirlwind took Elijah into "heaven" (shamayim). Jesus also speaks of ...


1

The chief thing to notice about the reference to ‘the first resurrection’ in Revelation 20, is that it is contrasted, not with a ‘second resurrection’, but with ‘the second death’ (Rev 20:6). Therefore, understanding what constitutes the ‘second death’ in this passage may throw some light on what ‘the first resurrection' actually refers to. The subjects of ...


1

I think it is helpful here to look at how the phrase "high places" is used. The Hebrew word is "bamah". This look will be chronological. 1) Samuel sacrifices at the high places, and many of his contemporary prophets are associated with these high places (1Sam 9, 10:5, 10:13). This is not contrary to Israelite religion, as Jerusalem had not yet been ...


1

I'm not sure there is a contradiction between the two letters, in 1 Thess 5:1 Paul says "But concerning the times and the seasons, brethren, you have no need that I should write to you." (NKJV) in 5:4 he says, "But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief." and 5:6 says, "Therefore let us not sleep, as others do, ...


1

The context is that Miriam and Aaron were gossiping about Moses. God intervenes and tells them that unlike other prophets, including Miriam and Aaron, to whom he speaks via dreams, God speaks to Moses while he is awake and they have entire conversations. Of course, he does not literally speak with him face to face, as God does not have such a face that a ...



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