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9

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


8

In the original post Gen 11:10 is only partially cited, like this - Gn 11:10 When Shem was 100 years old, he became the father of Arpachshad… although in the OP answer, the rest of the verse is quoted: Gen 11:10 ...Shem was 100 years old, and begat Arpachshad 2 years after the flood. Of course, that end phrase ("two years after the flood") solves ...


7

Genesis 5:32 does not say that Noah was 500 years old exactly when he had Shem, it says: And Noah was five hundred years old: and Noah begat Shem, Ham, and Japheth. (KJV) with the colon in there it disconnects the births from his age. The five hundred years is there to note when God gave him his marching orders. It shows us in concert with Genesis ...


7

We cannot read NT passages into the Old Testament to explain difficulties - each passage must be understood in its own context. Otherwise I would read the second half of 2 Pet 3:8 into Genesis and say that Methuselah was almost a day old when he died. Instead, I'll give an OT example with similar wording to try to understand the meaning behind the Hebrew ...


6

I Personally Believe Peter Denied Christ Exactly Six Times I did a study of this exact problem in my seminary studies for my M.Div., and just looking at the textual details and collating the accounts came to the conclusion that the answer is best resolved as seeing it as two sets of denials of three each, with each group of the three occurring prior to a ...


6

One issue is that some Greek manuscripts take the Greek phrase και εσταθην επι την αμμον της θαλασσης ("and I stood upon the sand of the sea") and number it as Rev. 12:18, whereas other make it as the beginning of Rev. 13:1. The Greek text produced by Robert I Estienne (1550) states, 12:18 και εσταθην επι την αμμον της θαλασσης 13:1 και ειδον εκ της ...


6

Short Answer: Paul wanted the Corinthians to address blatant immorality in the congregation, and to be able to work through legal disputes within the context of the Church, but he didn't want them going around criticizing people and fault-finding. Words have a semantic range, so it is always important to look at what the author was attempting to communicate ...


6

Short Answer: The Israelites were enslaved in Egypt for 400 years. There is nothing in the chronologies that indicates anything different. Here's the chronology as provided in the Hebrew Scriptures: The easy calculations: When Abe was 100 he had Isaac When Isaac was 60 he had Jacob When Jacob (Israel) was 130 he and his sons went to Egypt NOTE: Jacob ...


6

Not All Speech was Removed The Muting Declared and Defined Ezekiel's muting is recorded in chapter 3, verse 26 (NKJV): I will make your tongue cling to the roof of your mouth, so that you shall be mute and not be one to rebuke them, for they are a rebellious house. But the very next verse (v.27) indicates that this muting is not full (emphasis ...


5

I believe the better explanation is the common practice of rounding numbers. Shem was ca. 100 years old when the flood began, though his exact age may have been 98. Similarly, David reigned 7 1/2 years over Judah, 33 years over all Israel, and 40 years total (2Sam 5:5): unless one assumes one of these numbers are rounded, one has a serious problem. ...


5

It is commonly believed that Job's original 10 children are in Heaven. The texts do say that Job received a "twice as much", and that he had "more": Job 42:10 And the LORD turned the captivity of Job, when he prayed for his friends: also the LORD gave Job twice as much as he had before. Job 42:12 So the LORD blessed the latter end of Job more ...


4

This question is too good to have no answers, but I fear my answer will not do it justice. I hope others will take a shot at it as well - even if for no other reason than to prove me wrong. 1) Paul is converted on the way to Damascus (let's call this year 0) Acts 9:8 Then Saul arose from the ground, and when his eyes were opened he saw no one. But they ...


4

I agree in large part with both Niobius's answer and Joseph's answer, but have a particular disagreement with Joseph's that I feel must be noted, and a particular missed opportunity from Niobius's answer to help explain Gen 2:17. My Two Agreements Both answers acknowledge that in not all instances does that phrase refer to actually dying on the same day ...


4

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


3

About Time Does not need to be "the same" time, and is not the same time Notice that the Mk 15:25 (3rd hour) is stated as "when they crucified him." In the Jn 19:14 passage (6th hour) the reference is to when Pilate sat in his place of judgement for the final condemnation of Christ to the cross. There are time differences The easy way to state it is that ...


3

In Biblical Hebrew the infinitive absolute functions as an "absolute complement" or adverb to indicate intensity. So in Gen 2:17 the infinitive מֹות modifies the imperfect verb תָּמוּת, and of course the context indicates the future. That is, literally that day Adam "...was surely to die..." Another example of this verb/adverb arrangement are the ...


3

Samuel lived around 1100-900 BC. Esther lived around 475 BC (Assuming Xerxes I is the king referred to in that account). I wouldn't trust Wikipedia to offer an analysis proceeding from the assumption that the Bible is true and reliable. I can't speak about modern Jewish tradition, but Deuteronomy 25:17-19 is about the Amalekites attacking Israel after they ...


3

This is not precisely an answer to the question, but it is a requisite concept. (It also didn't fit into a comment well.) Margin of Error When Linking "When X was Y years" Statements When I say "error" here, I'm not referring to errors in the text, only inaccuracies in measuring lengths of time. Linking ages statements together has a necessarily large ...


3

In the last 5 verses of Genesis it seems Joseph’s age at death of 110 is given twice. Joseph dies at about 110 That isn’t done for anyone else and made me think the authors might be defining “life” as one thing and “years old" ("age" and "lifetime") as another. Looking at the question above from a math perspective and assuming “life” is a synonym for ...


3

Marriage Prohibitions The two references you give (Dt 7:3, Ez 9:12) explicitly help answer your question (though the Ezra one is technically irrelevant since it was centuries after the time of Samson). Both passages list an explicit set of people when a slightly expanded context is shown: Deut 7:1-3 (KJV) 1When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into ...


3

As the judgment was against all those counted in the census commentaries that I have consulted strictly assume the judgment was literally agains only these 'men' excluding the Levites. I think there is not much to add from what you have already listed except one item. The census counted those where were 'able to fight', i.e. men over twenty, not from the ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


2

While Joseph's answer has much to commend it, I feel it is headed in the wrong direction. I don't think there is a need to suppose two sets of Abiathars and Ahimelechs where one is father-son and the other vice versa. First, 1 Kings 2:26-27 is clear that it was indeed the so-called "good" Abiathar it's talking about since verse 27 notes that his life was ...


2

The following comments add very little, if anything, to Jas 3.1's fine answer. They may, however, have some relevance to the "judgment phobic" culture in which we live today in America. Christians are to use good judgment in the appropriate circumstances, whether the context is church discipline, or the context is applying wisdom and discernment to a ...


2

I believe there were not more than three denials, based on the Two Sources hypothesis accepted in one form or another by the majority of New Testament critical scholars. This hypothesis states that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel, with some further material, mainly sayings attributed to Jesus, from the hypothetical ...


2

In Revelation 20:14, what is Death, Hades, and the Lake of Fire? My thoughts on this question: o "Death" is physical death. o "Hades" is the place of the dead (usually used of the wicked dead in the NT). o "Death" and "hades" go together since each one implies the other. o "Death" often occurs in the same verse as "hades" in OT verses (in the ...


1

The Genesis commentary by Keil and Delitsch, though reprinted in English translation in 1996, was in fact written in 1861. It is doubtless still a valuable work, but it must be said that there has been some advance (perhaps not much) in Old-Testament studies in the last century and a half. Specifically to this issue there is a well-known book by Edwin ...


1

Most commentaries (actually all of them) that I looked up do not try and create an argument that would escape a copyists mistake in the manuscripts that are available to us today. It seems that it was quite easy to make a copyists mistake with Hebrew Numerals that would go undetected by other copyists due to the confusion of reckoning dates. Here is one ...


1

Although the Jews began their days at dusk and Romans began their days at midnight, that is not how either civilisation measured the passage of time. Simply speaking, the mechanical clock had not yet been invented. E. G. Richards describes in Mapping Time how shadow clocks were used to divide the hours of daylight up into exactly 12 hours of variable length ...



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