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9

Regarding "key differences": When one battles, one has also encountered - no issue. When one engages, one has also met - no issue. When one is said to have been killed "by" a commander of troops, that does not mean one was necessarily killed directly by that commander. It can just as easily have been by the troops that were under his command. For example, ...


7

There are several possible explanations. Your specific belief about the correctness of the Bible or its original sources may limit you to a certain set of these. Paul made a mistake. Chapter 9 describes Paul's encounter. Chapter 22 describes Paul describing the encounter. He mispoke or misremembered or offered his own incorrect understanding of his ...


6

I Personally Believe Peter Denied Christ Exactly Six Times I did a study of this exact problem in my seminary studies for my M.Div., and just looking at the textual details and collating the accounts came to the conclusion that the answer is best resolved as seeing it as two sets of denials of three each, with each group of the three occurring prior to a ...


6

It is commonly believed that Job's original 10 children are in Heaven. The texts do say that Job received a "twice as much", and that he had "more": Job 42:10 And the LORD turned the captivity of Job, when he prayed for his friends: also the LORD gave Job twice as much as he had before. Job 42:12 So the LORD blessed the latter end of Job more ...


6

Not All Speech was Removed The Muting Declared and Defined Ezekiel's muting is recorded in chapter 3, verse 26 (NKJV): I will make your tongue cling to the roof of your mouth, so that you shall be mute and not be one to rebuke them, for they are a rebellious house. But the very next verse (v.27) indicates that this muting is not full (emphasis ...


5

The Idea in Brief According to the Hebrew Bible, there are at least two people who have ascended into heaven: Enoch and Elijah. In the Christian New Testament, Jesus made the emphatic statement that no one (οὐδεὶς) had ever ascended into heaven with the exception of the one who had descended from heaven: that is, Jesus himself, who was to be "lifted up" ...


4

I agree in large part with both Niobius's answer and Joseph's answer, but have a particular disagreement with Joseph's that I feel must be noted, and a particular missed opportunity from Niobius's answer to help explain Gen 2:17. My Two Agreements Both answers acknowledge that in not all instances does that phrase refer to actually dying on the same day ...


3

The Idea in Brief The Greek verb ἀκούω means to hear and/or to understand. Discussion In the Greek New Testament, the verb ἀκούω means to hear and/or to understand. For example, in the following verse people can "hear" the voice but they cannot "understand" what the voice is saying. 1 Cor 14:2 (mGNT) 2 ὁ γὰρ λαλῶν γλώσσῃ οὐκ ἀνθρώποις λαλεῖ ἀλλὰ ...


3

I believe there were not more than three denials, based on the Two Sources hypothesis accepted in one form or another by the majority of New Testament critical scholars. This hypothesis states that the Gospels of Matthew and Luke were substantially based on Mark's Gospel, with some further material, mainly sayings attributed to Jesus, from the hypothetical ...


3

There is no problem here. Jesus is speaking to Nicodemus. Jesus knows that Nicodemus has great knowledge of the scriptures. Jesus pulls from Proverbs 30:4 to speak of the lack of understanding Nicodemus is having. 4 Who has ascended to heaven and come down? Who has gathered the wind in his fists? Who has wrapped up the waters in a garment? Who has ...


3

As the judgment was against all those counted in the census commentaries that I have consulted strictly assume the judgment was literally agains only these 'men' excluding the Levites. I think there is not much to add from what you have already listed except one item. The census counted those where were 'able to fight', i.e. men over twenty, not from the ...


3

Marriage Prohibitions The two references you give (Dt 7:3, Ez 9:12) explicitly help answer your question (though the Ezra one is technically irrelevant since it was centuries after the time of Samson). Both passages list an explicit set of people when a slightly expanded context is shown: Deut 7:1-3 (KJV) 1When the LORD thy God shall bring thee into ...


3

About Time Does not need to be "the same" time, and is not the same time Notice that the Mk 15:25 (3rd hour) is stated as "when they crucified him." In the Jn 19:14 passage (6th hour) the reference is to when Pilate sat in his place of judgement for the final condemnation of Christ to the cross. There are time differences The easy way to state it is that ...


2

While Joseph's answer has much to commend it, I feel it is headed in the wrong direction. I don't think there is a need to suppose two sets of Abiathars and Ahimelechs where one is father-son and the other vice versa. First, 1 Kings 2:26-27 is clear that it was indeed the so-called "good" Abiathar it's talking about since verse 27 notes that his life was ...


2

Talmud answers the seeming "contradictions" between Numbers and Deuteronomy. The rabbis indicated that the Lord had commanded Moses "to send for himself" (that is, for Moses) the spies into the land. The Talmud mentions Deut 1:23, when Moses indicates that sending the spies had pleased him (that is, not God, but Moses). The following citation comes from ...


2

Regardless of whether Moses initiated the idea of sending spies onto Canaan or whether he did so at God's command, Moses was in practice the one who sent the spies. However, Numbers 13:17b-20, authorship of which is generally attributed to the Yahwist Source, is closer to Deuteronomy 1:21-23 than is Numbers 13:1-17a, in which (Numbers 13:1-2) God told Moses ...


2

And in thy seed shall all the nations of the earth be blessed, because thou hast hearkened to my voice." Genesis 22:18 LXX kai eneuloghqhsontai en tw spermati sou panta ta eqnh ths ghs anq¢ wn uphkousas ths emhs fwnhs Note the use of the singular seed (spermati) Paul probably has in mind the LXX translation of the verse . Anyway, offspring can be understood ...


2

The OP presents two arguments used by some in the issue of Elijah being or not taken to heaven. @gutenburgb have already addressed the second one and I'll address the first one. The original verb for the quoted "no man hath ascended up to heaven" (KJV Joh 3.13) is ἀναβέβηκεν, which is the perfect active indicative of ἀναβαίνω, to go up, to ascend, acc. to ...


2

From my study I have come to the conclusion that Elijah wrote the "writing" before he was taken to heaven. It seems pretty clear that by "the prophet Elijah" the writer of Chronicles is not referring to a different Elijah. The Hebrew word miktab (translated "a writing") is also used in 2 Chron. 35:4 which says: And prepare yourselves by the houses of ...


2

Elijah may have been "relocated" by the Lord. This would explain several things. First, as you mentioned, the likelihood of the Elijah mentioned in 2 Chronicles, someone who would have been in the natural life span of Elijah, is significant. The writer of the Kings and Chronicles was either the same person (presumably Jeremiah), or they relied heavily on the ...


1

I think it is helpful here to look at how the phrase "high places" is used. The Hebrew word is "bamah". This look will be chronological. 1) Samuel sacrifices at the high places, and many of his contemporary prophets are associated with these high places (1Sam 9, 10:5, 10:13). This is not contrary to Israelite religion, as Jerusalem had not yet been ...


1

I'm not sure there is a contradiction between the two letters, in 1 Thess 5:1 Paul says "But concerning the times and the seasons, brethren, you have no need that I should write to you." (NKJV) in 5:4 he says, "But you, brethren, are not in darkness, so that this Day should overtake you as a thief." and 5:6 says, "Therefore let us not sleep, as others do, ...


1

The context is that Miriam and Aaron were gossiping about Moses. God intervenes and tells them that unlike other prophets, including Miriam and Aaron, to whom he speaks via dreams, God speaks to Moses while he is awake and they have entire conversations. Of course, he does not literally speak with him face to face, as God does not have such a face that a ...


1

The story of Samson is difficult for some because he was clearly very 'fleshly' in some ways, but in reality very holy and the best example of a body Israelite in his generation. With respect to the verse in question I think this quote begins a proper sorting: Samson, in the old fleshy nature, was seeking his own self-gratification: but the higher ...


1

The Genesis commentary by Keil and Delitsch, though reprinted in English translation in 1996, was in fact written in 1861. It is doubtless still a valuable work, but it must be said that there has been some advance (perhaps not much) in Old-Testament studies in the last century and a half. Specifically to this issue there is a well-known book by Edwin ...


1

Most commentaries (actually all of them) that I looked up do not try and create an argument that would escape a copyists mistake in the manuscripts that are available to us today. It seems that it was quite easy to make a copyists mistake with Hebrew Numerals that would go undetected by other copyists due to the confusion of reckoning dates. Here is one ...


1

Although the Jews began their days at dusk and Romans began their days at midnight, that is not how either civilisation measured the passage of time. Simply speaking, the mechanical clock had not yet been invented. E. G. Richards describes in Mapping Time how shadow clocks were used to divide the hours of daylight up into exactly 12 hours of variable length ...


1

According to Jewish tradition, the Sages of the Great Assembly -- the minor prophets and other leaders, including Ezra and Daniel, who left Babylon to rebuild the Temple 70 years after the destruction of the 1st Temple -- condensed Mordechai's original letter to the Jewish people into the book we now know as the Book of Esther. See Babyl. Talmud Bava Basra ...


1

At the outset let me state that I am Jewish, not Christian. That being said, Gal 3:16-17 is line with the Oral Tradition (that Orthodox Jews believe provides authoritative interpretation of the Old Testament). Abraham is told that his children will sojourn in "a land that is is not their own" for 400 years (Genesis 15:13). Egypt is not specified and neither ...


1

Annas had been elected high priest by the Jews, but subsequently deposed by the Romans, who appointed various successors before settling on his son-in-law, Caiaphas (Josephus, Antiquities, book XVIII 2.2). Not only was Annas highly regarded, but the Jews resented Roman interference in their religious affairs, so they still regarded him as the unofficial high ...



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