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9

The phrase "seven children" in the poem is almost certainly poetic and not intended to indicate that Hannah actually bore seven children. The number seven was a number of completion in the ancient Near East. It is readily seen elsewhere: Ruth 4:15 — He will renew your life and sustain you in your old age. For your daughter-in-law, who loves you and ...


9

The Hebrew text of Gen. 1:1-2 states, א בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ ב וְהָאָרֶץ הָיְתָה תֹהוּ וָבֹהוּ וְחֹשֶׁךְ עַל פְּנֵי תְהוֹם וְרוּחַ אֱלֹהִים מְרַחֶפֶת עַל פְּנֵי הַמָּיִם First, notice that v. 2 commences with a disjunctive vav, i.e. וְהָאָרֶץ. One website explains the disjunctive relationship as follows: The ...


8

'Clean' (טָהֵר) in Leviticus 16 The Hebrew verb טָהֵר / taher is used consistently throughout the Hebrew Bible in terms of cleansing or purifying, and so in the context of Leviticus 16 the stated meaning is that by performing the described ritual, the High Priest would have his sins cleansed and he would become pure. This ritual purification was required ...


6

A rhetorical response question would be, "Why would one think Act 2:36 is referring to Jesus being 'made Lord and Christ after the resurrection'?" This idea is reading more into Act 2:36 than is there. The ESV, and most translations, make the aorist indicative ἐποίησεν into "has made" (a perfective idea, a completed action). That is an interpretative move, ...


6

Clarification on Terms My definitions for clarification. Evening: The period of the Sun descending toward the horizon to set. Sunset: The exact time the Sun is no longer visible above the horizon. Evening Twilight: The period of decreasing light between Sunset and Dusk. Dusk: The exact time all sunlight is no longer visible in the western sky. Night: The ...


5

Interacting with Frank Luke's response, I like the theory proposed by E.W. Bullinger, however it does not seem to fit with what immediately follows in Chapter 18. First of all I believe that Bullinger is correct in his analysis of the construction of the passage. I agree that the intent is to contrast the Spirit coming upon David and leaving Saul, and ...


5

Eli's Failure Somewhat regardless of whether the word כָּהָה (kāhâ) should mean "rebuke" or "restrain," at the point which the sons refused to obey their father Eli (1 Sam 2:25), Eli should have had his sons killed on the basis of two, and possibly three points of the Law (quotes from NASB): Dishonoring God's Law—Lev 3 and Lev 4 with Num 15:30-311 ...


4

Since I have given Alan a bit of a hard time, I feel somewhat obligated to provide an answer. :) Context Like all passages, the key to understanding Exodus 32:26-29 is to look at the broader context. In the previous chapters of Exodus, Moses has lead the Israelites out of Egypt through a series of miraculous events. He has now gone up Mount Sinai to get ...


4

The Idea in Brief Eli had done nothing to "tone down" his sons, or to mitigate their behavior. So while on the one hand he had rebuked them in Chapter 2, there is nothing in the text to suggest that he had done anything from that time onward to mitigate their behavior, which is the observation in Chapter 3. Later in the book, Samuel himself comes to have ...


4

Frequently, an "Angel of the LORD" will appear in passages throughout the Bible to bring a message to an individual. In these instances, the speech used is always that of God himself. Tradition held that messages came with the full authority, weight, and force of the person who sent it. This messenger was an extension of the originator of the messenger ...


4

I recently answered a similar question, so I will repost my answer here with a few edits: The problem with your interpretation of the word "void" is that it proceeds from a false premise of "Creatio Ex Nilho" (Creation from Nothing) which was a concept that arrived on the scene with Platonic philosophy. This is not to say that this philosophy is wrong ...


4

No, there is no contradiction here. Even without tearing into the details of what each concept means, a plain reading of the text introduces no contradiction. First of all, your characterization of the first passage as Jesus "abdicating" isn't quite accurate as that word would imply he completely removed himself from the position of authority. That's not ...


4

Relationship of the texts To determine how to reconcile the Gospels accounts, we first need to determine the relationship between the different accounts. The best way to do this is to look at the original Greek. Below are the verses in question. Since a few Biblical scholars also think Luke 10:4 is related, I went ahead and included it too. The Greek ...


4

Then he [John] said to the multitudes that came out to be baptized by him, “Brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? -Luke 3:7 (NKJV) Luke 3:7 says the multitude came out to be baptized by John. Luke then proceeds with John rebuking pretty much everyone, with Luke specifying exactly how much John rebuked people, even up to the ...


3

Since the stories are incompatible, can we conclude that at least one of them was invented? How can we tell which is true, if any? I would like to challenge the assumption that the the two narratives of the birth of Jesus are incompatible. Roman Catholic scholar Raymond Brown writes: This leads us to the observation that the two narratives are not ...


3

The simple answer is, of course they are different, they are describing actions that happened on two separate occasions. One narrates from His birth until 40 days later; while the other tells of events that happened around the age of two. First you have to remember that there were no chapter and verse markers in the original Greek; you can’t always assume ...


3

No contradiction There is not really anything contradictory about stating it this way just because Christ is understood to be pre-existent.1 This can be understood looking at it from two perspectives. Human Perspective You make the statement: I would never say "I foreknow my son" if he is sitting next to me. Yet I believe you can imagine a scenario ...


3

Uta Ranke-Heinemann says, in Putting Away Childish Things, page 7, that the nativity accounts in the Gospels of Matthew and Luke are, with respect to time, place, and circumstances, a collection of legends. She says (page 11) Luke wants to make the birth of Jesus in Bethlehem plausible by fabricating the story of the census. But since he handles the facts ...


3

Let's take both scriptures and look at them. Jn 15:13: Greater love has no one than this: to lay down one's life for one's friends. Mt 5:44,46-47: But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, [..] If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet ...


3

It was not uncommon for people in the Bible to go under multiple monikers. Abram was also known as Abrham (Gen 17:5), Sarah was also known as Sarai (Genesis 17:15), Jacob was also known as Israel (Genesis 35:10) and so forth. This simply appears to be another one of those instances. Names in Hebrew culture often had significance and names were often ...


3

There are two possible explanations. One is that the individual Gospel writers did not arrange events in a chronologic order; each one organized the events in a way that made the most sense to their audience or to best fit their theological emphasis. The second is that Jesus did this on more than one occasion and John records the first which took place ...


3

I believe you are missing the fact that chapters 17 through 21 of the book of Judges are out of chronological sequence. According to the time line provided at BibleHub, the incident recorded in Judges 18, concerning the Danites, happened only about 25 years after the land had been allotted to the tribes. Robert Jamieson says this: The Danites had a ...


3

Jewish culture during the Second Temple period was heavily influenced by the Babylonians. E. G. Richards says in Mapping Time, pages 221-222, that the seven-day Jewish week, although of great antiquity, was possibly of Babylonian origin. During the Babylonian Captivity the Jews adopted the Babylonian calendar and began to use month names that were based on ...


3

Because God is both immanent and transcendent. He is omnipresent and not bound by the confines of His creation (transcendent). He is uniquely separate from His creation; thus He is not "hanging out in the clouds". But for those who are in Christ (to whom the scripture is addressed) He is also immanent--with them at all times through His indwelling. In ...


3

Answer: At that time of Spring, (the Vernal Equinox), the hours of the day would have corresponded with each other - regardless of the System used. Temporal vs. Fixed Hours: The first problem in using the day is to decide when it begins and ends – its phase – so that events may be assigned to a day without ambiguity. Some nations decided to begin their ...


2

The problem is that John 15:13 is out of context. If you look at it in context, what is Jesus talking about? His fellowship with one another. NASB Translation: Note, this is shortly before he even lays down his own life for them at the cross. 12 “This is My commandment, that you love one another, just as I have loved you. 13 Greater love has no one ...


2

Paul is actually defending himself here in this second letter to the Corinthians. In this passage when he says "us" he is meaning the people that he has been ministering to as well as the Corinthians, but when he gets to that last line So then, death is at work in us, but life is at work in you, he is telling them, almost forcefully, that they are not alone ...


2

There are no serious manuscript or textual issues with this verse (Jerome's Vulgate notwithstanding). The English translation of “the twelve” appears to represent the original text and the author’s intention. Commentators have offered various explanations for this number which appears to fail to account for Judas’ death and Thomas’ absence. A popular ...


2

The accounts in Mark 5:1ff and Matthew 8:28ff are clearly the same story, in spite of Matthew having two demon-possessed men, to Mark's one. Jesus had crossed the Sea of Galilee, there was a herd of swine and the many demons implored Jesus to release them into the herd of swine. It is the strong consensus of scholars that Mark's Gospel was written first and ...



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