Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

11

A literalistic reading of the aforementioned passage in Mathew teaches that under a certain circumstance, namely "your eye causes you to sin," one most poke out his or her own eye. A literary (non-literal) reading of the passage sees the usage of hyperbole and a vivid visual image to communicate the horrifying and traumatic nature of sin. The former reading ...


10

First, let's fix up some of your terminology. The thing you are calling "chapters" are generally referred to as "books". The Bible is composed of many different books written at different times at the hands of several human authors (although all inspired). Each book is then divided up into chapters and verses for easy reference. Secondly the "first few" ...


7

Disclosure: This represents an Eastern Christian perspective (yet its applicability is not confined solely to Eastern Christians). I've met many very intellectually gifted Protestants who share their hermeneutical approach to scripture and yet come up with widely varying positions on the interpretation of various passages. Hence 23,000+ Protestant ...


6

"Propitiation" is the preferred choice of the two since it addresses both the context and the theology of the act. The meaning of propitiation is actually more forceful than how it is normally translated, as "appeasing." Instead, it's more in line with specifically being the object of the direct wrath of the deity in question (in the Greek mind) for ...


6

I was taught in seminary 2 foundational rules to remember before all others. Pay attention to the text. Pay attention to the context. While you won't see these rules stated verbatim in Scripture, you will certainly see them applied. Notice throughout the NT how the phrase, "It is written" and similar phrases appear. These are always used with quotes of ...


5

I would suggest that propitiation, expiation and mercy seat are all viable options. My reasoning is based on theological and linguistic insights. I subscribe to the linguistic theory of signs and signification. Words are considered signs and their meaning is derived (signified) by the real word entities they point to. When we communicate using the word ...


5

My answer might not be in line with the question if you only mean technical methods. However there is the obvious notion of prayer and reliance upon the Holy Spirit to open our eyes to what He has written to us. After all if the Spirit is the true author and men only the medium, we have more advantage in understanding the words by the Spirit than we would if ...


4

The Tetragrammaton, or "YHWH" which is often pronounced "Yahweh" or "Jehovah", is the proper name of the God of the Bible. The word "Elohim" or any variation thereof ("El", "Eloh", "Elah".. etc) is a title which means simply "God" or more precisely, "Mighty Ones" (in the case of "Elohim", or in the singular for all the others) and not a proper name. Just as ...


4

Yes, I would suggest pay a lot of attention to the context, start basically when Jesus started, the exegetical rules of His time. One of the major hermeneutic approach of His time descends from the principles that Rab. Hillel recorded. The Seven Rules of Hillel: They are as follows: Ḳal (ḳol) wa-ḥomer: "Argumentum a minori ad majus" or "a majori ...


4

I find this to be a little bit of a loaded question; it makes a broad assumption that I don't fully agree with. But let me illustrate: Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may ...


3

Joh 5:39 Search the scriptures; for in them ye think ye have eternal life: and they are they which testify of me. An orthodox Christian site says: "A Biblical Christian is the one who, wherever he looks, on every page of Scripture, finds everywhere Christ." The fundamental rule is that all the scriptures speak of Christ, and until you see him in ...


2

Establishing the most foundational rule of hermeneutics is a bit like choosing your favorite child. The reality is that exegesis is a combination of methods to arrive at the best exposition of the true meaning of a passage. These methods include a variety of principles or rules, some of which are justified by the internal claims of the Bible itself, and some ...


2

Content of the Galatian False Gospel The main feature of this other gospel in Galatians is a compulsion to be circumcised. More generically, though, it can be expressed as a requirement to adhere to Jewish customs. In other words, there was an insistence that Christians live and act as Jews in order to share in the blessings given to Abraham. More ...


2

Hermeneutics: Scripture has two "senses": a literal (historical) and a spiritual (the message God is trying to get across to us). (See here for further explanation of this.) The Bible is completely true in both senses. Literal: Jesus literally said that "if your eye causes you to sin, tear it out and throw it away." This statement should be taken as an ...


2

The answer is in verse 13:11, "In all this, remember how critical the moment is...". That generation lived in a state of heightened Messianic expectation, of final judgement, a kind of unscheduled Yom Kippur. Paul's exhortations are in this context. He is telling people to "put their houses in order" as Tacitus would say, square their books, avoid ...


2

Except for the comment of Novatian (d. 258), comments I've seen on 1 Cor. 12:3 by the Ante-Nicean Fathers appear off-topic. Novatian might have been the only such proto-Orthodox writer to have addressed this seeming curse, alluding that: Established in this Spirit [of God], "none ever calleth Jesus anathema" (A Treatise of Novatian Concerning the Trinity ...


2

There is a parallel to between the passage in question and Galatians 4:8, which talks about the unbeliever who is impelled to idolatry. Galatians 4:8 (NASB) 8 However at that time, when you did not know God, you were slaves to those which by nature are no gods. The parallel is that the unbeliever is "led astray" toward idolatry (1 Cor 12:2), and the ...


1

What is interesting is that before attending the Last Supper, "Satan entered Judas" (Luke 22:3). Jesus knew that Satan had implanted the betrayal in the heart of Judas (John 13:2), and proceeded to wash the feet of Judas anyway. Then again before the Last Supper ended, "Satan entered Judas" (Jn 13:27). So what is puzzling is why someone who was possessed by ...


1

2Wherefore I praised the dead which are already dead more than the living which are yet alive.3Yea, better [is he] than both they, which hath not yet been, who hath not seen the evil work that is done under the sun.(Eccl. 3:2-3) The author(Solomon) is declaring that "better is the one who is dead, than the one who is yet to be born to see the ...


1

Paul is making a subtle reference to the Ten Commandments. He refers to the command to make no idols, and then the command against taking the Lord's name in vain. Thus, it is "word-and-response." The spoken Word comes from God (idols are dumb) and His people "take His name" upon them through the Covenant oath, a legal, public profession. "Amen" seals the ...


1

The significance of the various uses of the names Yahweh and Elohim can be better understood when we realise that often when the author uses the name Yahweh, the focus is on Judah, and whenever he uses the name Elohim, the focus tends to be on the northern kingdom of Israel. When the author uses the name Yahweh, he is speaking of an anthropomorphic God with ...


1

I see what you are getting at and think Paul is using extremes to show that falling under the leading and influence of the Holy Spirit is not a morally neutral experience separate from true doctrine. In other words if a person is claiming to encounter the Spirit, yet they deny Christ, such a person is not experiencing the Spirit. On the other hand if a ...


1

By making these seemingly simple statements a matter of speaking by the holy spirit or not, the Apostle is telling the Corinthian ekklesia that their emphasis on intellectuality misses the more important thing: to be filled by the Spirit of God. The joy of the Spirit is not the tickling of ears. It is the respect for what is holy and true that leads to a ...


1

Short Answer: Yes, the "fear of death" refers to being afraid of physically dying, as shown by the context in which it is used. The point is that Christ's solidarity with His people gave His people hope, thereby freeing them up to live the life He was calling them to without concern for what it might cost them. The passage is not about unbelievers and ...


1

To an unbeliever, there are two deaths. First the physical death, then the eternal death. An unbeliever will not acknowledge the second and therefore can only fear the physical. "But the fearful, and unbelieving, and the abominable, and murderers, and whoremongers, and sorcerers, and idolaters, and all liars, shall have their part in the lake which burneth ...


1

That chapter is a rather miscellaneous compendium of law. You might equally ask what the law about rape has to do with the law about returning lost property. "Treat marriage in a respectful way" is an awfully cleaned-up formulation for the law that concerns violations of the marriage contract, with potentially fatal consequences. Anyway, if you skip the ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible