Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Was the Luke of Colossians the author of Luke/Acts? Probably. As the two volumes do not themselves include the author's name, we can't be sure that the author was named Luke at all. However, Luke is only mentioned 3 times in Paul's letters and there is no indication there that he was a particularly prominent personage. Therefore, any external evidence ...


9

I think it is important that he doesn't say something like "what is lacking in the atonement of Christ" or even "in the cross of Christ" but "what is lacking in the suffering of Christ." Here's the most relevant portion of what Calvin says on this verse: We know that there is so great a unity between Christ and his members, that the name of Christ ...


5

Col 1:24 Who now rejoice in my sufferings for you, and fill up that which is behind of the afflictions of Christ in my flesh for his body’s sake, which is the church: The KJ is more comfortable: what lacks are the afflictions of Christ in Paul's flesh. He has not yet had what he is going to get. He is taking the brunt of it so that others in the ...


5

Likely polyptoton based on the ancient Hebrew prayer Nishmat that ends "shir ushvaha, hallel v'zimra" translated into Koine, in which case it would not necessarily be appropriate to look for a distinct meaning for each term. Attributed variously to the Apostle Peter and to Shimon ben Shatah, I guess depending on which side of the fence you are on, and ...


5

First I checked that the same phrase appears in both Col 3:16 and Eph 5:19. It does. psalmois, humnois, kai odais pneumatikais I then checked those words out in the lexicons and compared the words they translated in the LXX. psalmois - often for neginah, which means song, or mizmor, also meaning song. Used 92 times in the LXX but mostly in the title ...


4

The NET Bible translates this as: In him you also were circumcised—not, however,1 with a circumcision performed by human hands, but by the removal2 of the fleshly body,3 that is, 4 through the circumcision done by Christ. That's four footnotes in one verse, all related to translation issues: tn The terms “however” and “but” in this ...


4

Vines has oikonomos (οἰκονόμος, 3623) primarily denoted "the manager of a household or estate" (oikos, "a house," nemo, "to arrange"), "a steward" (such were usually slaves or freedmen), ...; in Rom. 16:23, the "treasurer" of a city (see CHAMBERLAIN); it is used metaphorically, in the wider sense, of a "steward" in general... oikonomia (οἰκονομία, ...


4

Hard Question, Soldarnal Peter O'Brien says of this verse in his Colossians commentary: This verse has been described as one of the most contested passages in the NT, presenting great difficulties in language and content. And Douglas Moo, in his: This verse furnishes the most important evidence about the false teaching, but it is also arguably the ...


4

"And I rejoice in the sufferings that are for your sake and I fill up the want of sufferings of The Messiah in my flesh for the sake of his body, which is the church" Aramaic Bible in Plain English (©2010) Might I offer a humble suggestion that Paul speaks of a deficiency of suffering in himself compared with the immense sufferings Christ took on. In ...


3

I think that a strong case could be made for "covetousness." I've also seen it rendered as "avarice," but this doesn't fit into the 8th grade reading level goal of most biblical translations, and it effectively conveys extreme greed, which isn't much better anyways. The sentence makes it clear that this "covetousness is idolatry" (πλεονεξιαν ητις εστιν ...


3

Household codes were common in Greco-Roman culture, going back to at least Artistotle in his book Politics. In these Greco-Roman household codes, the father has an effectively absolute rule over his household (which includes his wife, children, and slaves), and in comparison to the household codes from the New Testament, they are definitely much harsher in ...


3

It seems the opening of the letter to Philemon gives us the best probability of who Archippus was. “To Philemon our beloved fellow worker and Apphia our sister and Archippus our fellow soldier, and the church in your house:.” J.B. Lightfoot ponders quite a bit about this person, first he concludes with fair certainty that he was the child of Philemon and ...


3

Short answer Paul has heard from Epaphras of beliefs the Colossians held which got in the way of their relationship with God. We can't know very much about them beyond what Paul says about them because there isn't anything else recorded about them. At most, we can speculate. Long answer Paul starts his letter praising the Colossians for their faith and ...


3

I think it is helpful to consider a somewhat parallel verse, Gal 6:2, where Paul writes, "Bear the burdens of one another, and thus fulfill the law of Christ." The term fulfill (anapleroo) carries the idea of filling up something that is otherwise incomplete. At the same time, the burden-bearing in view has Christ as its primary exemplar; it is Christ "who ...


2

I see Paul using two separate, but interlocking images in this section. Both turn on the verse left out of the question. Colosians 1:21 (NIV): Once you were alienated from God and were enemies in your minds because of your evil behavior. Restore Creation The first is restoring creation, which fits well with Paul's portrayal of Jesus as creator. ...


2

For God was pleased to have all his fullness dwell in him, and through him to reconcile to himself all things, whether things on earth or things in heaven, by making peace through his blood, shed on the cross. But now he has reconciled you by Christ’s physical body through death to present you holy in his sight, without blemish and free from ...


2

The various options are: A. Paul's sufferings serve to atone for the sins of the Church B. Paul's sufferings serve to bring to mind the price paid by Christ, who suffered so that the Church would be reconciled to God. C. Paul's sufferings serve to fill up the suffering that all apostles need to bear, Christ-like sufferings. In this article , Prof N T ...


2

"Principalities" and "powers" are separated in the original language. The structure is similar to the ESV rather than the KJV. I will, therefore, treat them separately. Principalities The underlying word here can carry a range of meanings. In Romans 13:3, for instance, it refers to a human magistrate. In Ephesians 6:12 it is instead contrasted with "flesh ...


2

Possibly there are a few more words about slaves because the relationships within family are already settled matters in the Old Testament. There are no instructions in the Old Testament that I have noticed about how slaves should behave with respect to their masters. There is another dimension to this though that makes the slave/master issue important. If ...


1

The particular pairings of the three mentioned texts find parallels in Aristotle where he writes, "Now we should begin by examining everything in its fewest possible elements; and the first and fewest possible parts of a family are master and slave, husband and wife, father and children." (Politics I.3) However, these pairings lack any of the ethical ...


1

The Great Intrusion into creation was sin, which was accompanied by its handmaiden, death (which is both physical and spiritual). It was therefore the work of Christ that had "reconciled" to the Father what sin and death had taken away. In the epistle to the Ephesians there is a parallel verse that sheds light on the passage in Colossians - Ephesians ...


1

This answer is complementary to Jon's. Having thought about this and researched it a good deal more and discussed it with friends, I have decided to render the phrase the whole mass of the sinful nature. This rendering fits well with Colossians 3:5: So kill the parts [of you] which are worldly: sexual immorality, impurity, lust, evil passions, and greed, ...


1

James 2 v24 says the promise which God made to Abraham in Genesis 16 was fulfilled in Genesis 22 when he offered Isaac. Only when Abraham suffered the anguish of laying down his son was the scripture fulfilled. Like Abraham we fulfil scripture - bring it to fullness - when we act on it in faith. Until then it is just words. Perhaps in Colossians 1 Paul is ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible