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19

@Richard offered a decent but limited exegetical understanding of the text (he emphasized the definition of the verb but not the grammar behind it), albeit with a strong complementarian doctrinal bias. @Soldernal offered a good contextual study of the text, and made it clear that Paul permits women to speak elsewhere which is helpful to this discussion ...


11

This passage is not easy to understand, not least because certain interpretations offend many modern sensibilities. There are some (relatively minor) issues of textual criticism and of translation. There are some difficult referents, like "law" in verse 34. Moreover, the "crystal clear" line of total silence for women is difficult to adopt because in 1 ...


10

Looking at the verse, we can see that the command is crystal clear for woman to not speak in church. In fact, it mentions this four times in four different ways: The women are to keep silent they are not permitted to speak let them ask their own husbands at home it is improper for a woman to speak in church To further illustrate the point of silence, ...


6

The Greek is unambiguously referring to the church, not God. The word church (ἐκκλησία) is nominative case; the word God is in the genitive case (modifying the word church). The two words pillar (στῦλος) and ground (ἑδραίωμα ) are also nominative case, showing that they are in apposition to the church, not God. The Greek cases match each other when in an ...


5

Here is the text of Matthew 16:18 set out in Greek of Nestle-Aland 27 and English of ESV (as above): κἀγὼ δέ σοι λέγω ὅτι σὺ εἶ Πέτρος, kagō de soi legō hoti su ei Petros And I tell you, you are Peter, καὶ ἐπὶ ταύτῃ τῇ πέτρᾳ οἰκοδομήσω μου τὴν ἐκκλησίαν kai epi tautē tē(i) petra(i) oikodomēsō mou tēn ekklēsian and on this rock I will build ...


4

Contextually, Isaiah 49 is describing the return of Jacob/Israel from exile. Verse 49.5: 'And now YHWH says ... to bring Jacob back to him, that Israel might be gathered to him' This includes the rebuilding of the city Jerusalem/Zion. Beginning in verse 14: But Zion said, 'YHWH has forsaken me, and my Lord has forgotten me.' [YHWH's ...


4

In order to answer such a question, we must first put away our theological preferences, whether pre-, post-, or amillennial. Only then can we objectively consider the textual evidence: According to the NA-28 apparatus, the first half of the verse is missing in codex Sinaiticus, the byzantine manuscripts, and to a few much less significant manuscripts. ...


2

It seems more likely that this is a separate thought. God not being the God of confusion fits more naturally with what has preceded the statement, namely that the spirits of the prophets are subject to other prophets. The next set of thoughts begins "As in all the churches of the saints, the women must be silent." The present imperative can carry inceptive ...


2

This repetition seems to me to be more about being specific and emphatic than anything else - (I'm not making any statement about a modern application here!!). e.g. as in all churches, ... so in your Corinthian churches.


2

When Paul (1Cor 14:33) was refering to the Law he may have used the term in its wider sense as the whole Torah including the 1st Book of Moses where it is stated that (as a consequence of the transgression in Eden) the man would from then on rule over the woman. (Without conflict there would have been no such order.) The Law itself expands on the matter of ...


1

The book of Acts is a historical description of the formation of the church (called out assembly (ἐκκλησία)), who were mostly Gentiles, but were also Jews who were convicted and believed, like those in the day of Pentecost. The book of Acts describes how the church demonstrated their coping with the persecution and perseverance in the newly found faith. ...



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