Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Short Answer: Yes, it is definitely possible for John's chronology to be reconciled with that of the Synoptics. As the following chart shows, the sequence of Passion events recorded in John is in perfect harmony with the sequence in the Synoptics. When John's terminology is properly understood, it becomes clear that John's chronology does not contradict that ...


8

"Anachronism" is not a distinctive technical term in biblical hermeneutics, nor does it have a nuance which would distinguish it from its meaning in English more broadly. The Wikipedia article catches it nicely: "anachronism" is ...a chronological inconsistency in some arrangement, especially a juxtaposition of person(s), events, objects, or customs from ...


8

Short Answer: Abram did indeed depart from Haran after his father died, as the Old Testament indicates, and as the New Testament explicitly claims. (Terah was 130 years old when Abram was born.) Good question. (This happens to be one of the most commonly asked -- and addressed -- "discrepancies" in Scripture.) The problem is in the modern Western reading ...


7

As the text says, Avram was 75 when he left Haran. So, either Terach was 130 when Avram was born, or Avram left while Terach was still alive. The medieval commentator (and compiler), Rashi, argues for Avram leaving during Terach's lifetime, based on Gen 12:4: and Terah died in Haran: [This happened] after Abram had left Haran and had come to the land ...


7

Though I don't know of a Bible published that way, there are some reading plans on the web that work as you describe. A couple of options for reading plans can be found here. This site is the closest I found to what you wrote about. It has several plans available which may benefit you such as the historical and chronological plans. You'll want to watch ...


6

Abstract John's Gospel does not stick to a chronological narrative that Mark and the other Synoptics adhere to. In fact, the text often makes forward references that indicate it was intended to be read with knowledge of the whole story. One reason the author does this is to use particular events in a person's life to define their character. John ...


6

A few sources that might be helpful on this are as follows: Andreas Köstenberger A Theology of John's Gospel and Letters: The Word, the Christ, the Son of God D. A. Carson The Gospel According to John Mark Strauss Four Portraits, One Jesus Köstenberger argues extensively for the historicity of John's gospel. He surveys the history of scholarship in ...


5

Short Answer: The Israelites were enslaved in Egypt for 400 years. There is nothing in the chronologies that indicates anything different. Here's the chronology as provided in the Hebrew Scriptures: The easy calculations: When Abe was 100 he had Isaac When Isaac was 60 he had Jacob When Jacob (Israel) was 130 he and his sons went to Egypt NOTE: Jacob ...


4

In fact, Paul Verhoeven actually leans this way: Palm branches are typical of Sukkot, as they were brought to Jerusalem from the Jordan Valley in September and used to construct the tabernacles (skēnai). X. Léon-Dufour writes, "We can take it as assued that Jesus once visited Jerusalem in the autumn, at the feast of Tabernacles," and M. Goguel agrees. R. ...


4

     I propose that the variations seen in the genealogies of Genesis arose from an effort to praise or villify certain patriarchs. Specifically, there is evidence of a motivation to praise the first five generations from Adam to Mahalalel, and to villify Jared, Methuselah, and Lamech. I refer to the Wikipedia chart given above in ...


4

I looked at your chronology charts from the other question to understand the context of your question here. There is certainly no linguistic or exegetical reason that v.6 could not be a "summary" statement about the age of Noah during the flood. Verse 6 simply states a fact: Noah was six hundred years old when the floodwaters were on the earth. He may ...


3

Contextualizing a text is fraught with all kinds of pitfalls. Distancing ourselves (the act of distanciation) from our preconceived ideas of what words mean to us today whenever interpreting a text from ancient history is at times difficult, but it pays rich rewards in the hermeneutical process. Think what happens, however, when we fail to do so. Think of ...


3

If such scholarship exists, I don't know about it. But there is a slightly nuanced position that suggests that the material in the Fourth Gospel has at least as much, if not more, historical weight than the Synoptics. What you seem to be asking for is scholar who takes John's chronology over, say, Mark's every time. That seems a tall order since the ...


3

Leviticus 23 begins with the definition of the Sabbath day, and then equates the Sabbath with the "appointed times," which are the holy convocations (or the feasts and festivals). In other words, most (but not all) of the Jewish feasts and festivals were declared automatic Sabbath days in the Law of Moses, which means that even though they may not fall on ...


2

I find your question a little perplexing, though I assume--rightly I hope--that your question has to do with the apparently conflicting descriptions of the events which occurred after Jesus' death and before He resurrected and appeared to His disciples, starting with Mary Magdalene. In attempting to come up with an answer, I consulted Orville E. Daniel's ...


2

Gal 3:16-17 says that the law came 430 years after Abraham received the promise of blessing (in Gen 12). 25 years passed before he got his son Isaac, who lived 60 years until he got his son Jacob, who was 130 years old when he entered Egypt. That is, 215 years passed between Abraham received the promise, and Israel entered Egypt. Israel received the law ...


2

Short Answer: There is no contradiction. John is not claiming that Jesus went into Galilee immediately after His baptism -- he is claiming that Jesus went into Galilee immediately after the day recorded in 1:29-34 -- a day in which John the Baptist testified to the Jews that he had already baptized Jesus some time prior. So, to answer the question directly, ...


2

The way the date is given is perfectly in keeping with how dates are cited in Biblical Hebrew: first the year (described in relation to a significant figure), then the month and day. So for example, Haggai 1:1, "In the second year of Darius the king, in the sixth month, on the first day of the month." It is clearly not the sixth month/first day of Darius' ...


2

בִּשְׁנַת שֵׁשׁ־מֵאֹות שָׁנָה לְחַיֵּי־נֹחַ בַּחֹדֶשׁ הַשֵּׁנִי בְּשִׁבְעָה־עָשָׂר יֹום לַחֹדֶשׁ Literally: In year 600 of the years (belonging) to the life of Noah, in month two, in (the) 17(th) day (belonging) to the month. "Year 600 of the years (belonging) to the life of Noah", means the year ending with his 600th birthday, i.e., the year when he was ...


1

I would say the answer is contained right in both verses. Gen 7:6 says Noah was 600 "when the flood of waters was upon the earth," while 8:13 says "the waters have been dried off the earth" (emphasis added in both verses). The waters cannot be both "upon" and "dried off" at the same time. Gen 7:6 is about a year before 8:13. Update from Comment The Hebrew ...


1

Noah’s age is not the only detail in the story that gets repeated. In fact many of the points of the story are repeated. The parallels between 7:6 and 7:11 may not be anything specific to Noah’s age. For example, the story repeats: The number of animals taken into the ark (7 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:2f, then 2 clean and 2 unclean in verse 7:8f) ...


1

I believe the other answer is not a good understanding of the historical event in context. One thing we should not do is try to read into the text what we know from tradition. The tradition I am speaking of is Good Friday. We should not try to fit the text into man made traditions because it simply doesn't work and it does not match with the written ...


1

I would propose the following approach: For the time before the flood: Primacy of the Massoretic numbers. They have the greatest variance and most support by the Samaritan text (and in the three differing cases - Jared, Methuselah, Lamech - the Masoretic agrees or comes close to the Septuagint). For the time after the flood: Primacy of Septuagint and ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible