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8

The "two" in some translations is an interpretative addition. It does not exist in the Hebrew of Gen 18:22, which is simply הָֽאֲנָשִׁ֔ים ("the men"). The word "two" is added in those translations for "clarity" (which clarity can inadvertently create confusion, such as evidenced in your question). The idea is added because it is understood by many ...


7

I don't know the method that Wayne Grudem used. On possible method is Levenshtein Distance, which measures the number of insertions, deletions, and subsitutions needed to convert one text to another. In order to test the method and compare it with the 92% found in the chart, I ran the first chapter of Genesis (without verse numbers) through an online ...


6

The Hebrew of the Masoretic text states, כִּי יֶלֶד יֻלַּד לָנוּ בֵּן נִתַּן לָנוּ וַתְּהִי הַמִּשְׂרָה עַל שִׁכְמוֹ וַיִּקְרָא שְׁמוֹ פֶּלֶא יוֹעֵץ אֵל גִּבּוֹר אֲבִיעַד שַׂר שָׁלוֹם כִּי (ki) : a conjunction, meaning "for." יֶלֶד (yeled): a noun that can refer to "a child" (cp. Gen. 21:8; Exo. 1:17-18, 2:3, etc.) or even "a young man" (cp. Gen. ...


3

I'm not sure why you contrast Hebrew and Jewish versification; they are one and the same. In Hebrew/Jewish Bibles, Genesis 31:54 is "ויזבח יעקב זבח בהר ויקרא לאחיו לאכל לחם ויאכלו לחם וילינו בהר". In the translation of the NRSV, this is rendered: "and Jacob offered a sacrifice on the height and called his kinsfolk to eat bread; and they ate bread and tarried ...


3

All the differences between the Hebrew/Aramaic Old Testament and the LXX are in a helpful pdf (of Appendix E from SBL's Handbook of Style) which a person named Denise has posted on this page: http://community.logos.com/forums/p/67596/470753.aspx


2

The Bible does not explicitly say "two men" at Gen. 18:22, simply saying "the men" (האנשים). The translators, like the rabbis, infer that two men were there because of the transition at Gen. 19:1 ("And the two angels came to Sodom..."). Rashi, citing the Jewish tradition recorded in the Babylonian Talmud at Bava Metzia 86b) reflects that there were three ...


2

The number "666" or "616" is taken from the passage in Rev. 13:18, Here is wisdom. Let him that hath understanding count the number of the beast: for it is the number of a man; and his number is Six hundred threescore and six. and has been arguably the most contested verse of the New Testament. The source of the problem is whether it is to be ...


2

In Aramaic of Peshitta this word for winter is ܒܣܬܘܐ and it can also (apart from winter) mean tempest, foul weather, stormy weather (according to Lexicon to the Syriac New Testament by William Jennings and J. Payne Smith's A Compendious Syriac Dictionary). You could think about interpreting Matthew 24:20 as referring to a stormy weather.


2

Winter refers to what climate According to ISBE, Winter is the "rainy season." The rainy season ushers in a marked change in temperature from highs during the summer ranging from 85°F to triple digits. The "winter" months have both hard frosts and snow each year. Apparently the biblical writers were not focused as much on "seasons" as they were on ...



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