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14

To answer your first question, we should not simply accept Sinaiticus as the source of the truth for the New Testament. It has great weight in debates from its age, but age is not the final arbiter in textual considerations. Codex Sinaiticus was made in the 4th century on parchment using capital letters (a manuscript in all capitals is called an "uncial"). ...


13

The Hebrew Bible is primarily in Biblical Hebrew (the term given to the Semitic language that the Bible was written in from which modern Hebrew descends) with some Aramaic in various places (Ezra 4:8-6:18; 7:12-26; Jeremiah 10:11; Daniel 2:46-7:28; and two words in Genesis 31:47). The New Testament is in Koine (common) 1st-century Greek. Koine Greek ...


8

The source texts for the NT include various Greek manuscripts and sometimes the Latin Vulgate. The source texts for the OT include the Masoretic text (Aleppo Codex, Leningrad Codex), as well as the Latin Vulgate, Greek Septuagint, and Dead Sea Scrolls. Translators of new English translations often use some or all of those source texts when producing a new ...


7

Can do either, obviously. If they edit an existing translation, this is called a "rescension" (The Living Bible was one, a paraphrase of the KJV). However, most of the time, they use Hebrew, Greek, and Aramaic text. As an example, The New Living Translation does this. But they don't stop with just one manuscript. They compare different manuscripts of a ...


7

Though I don't know of a Bible published that way, there are some reading plans on the web that work as you describe. A couple of options for reading plans can be found here. This site is the closest I found to what you wrote about. It has several plans available which may benefit you such as the historical and chronological plans. You'll want to watch ...


6

There really isn't a body that controls what is called a Bible and what isn't. There are groups that put their stamp of approval on translations and study Bibles though. For instance, the Assemblies of God funded the study notes for the Life in the Spirit Study Bible which has notes and essays (set aside from the text and marked as additions) specifically ...


6

The word "Bible" is derived from the Greek word "biblio", meaning "book". In that sense, just about any book can be called a bible. But because Christians believe the Bible is the authoritative source for doctrine, the word "Bible" has taken a connotation meaning "authoritative". So sometimes books will include the word "Bible" in their title to imply that ...


6

The Hebrew of the Masoretic text states, כִּי יֶלֶד יֻלַּד לָנוּ בֵּן נִתַּן לָנוּ וַתְּהִי הַמִּשְׂרָה עַל שִׁכְמוֹ וַיִּקְרָא שְׁמוֹ פֶּלֶא יוֹעֵץ אֵל גִּבּוֹר אֲבִיעַד שַׂר שָׁלוֹם כִּי (ki) : a conjunction, meaning "for." יֶלֶד (yeled): a noun that can refer to "a child" (cp. Gen. 21:8; Exo. 1:17-18, 2:3, etc.) or even "a young man" (cp. Gen. ...


6

Although Frank has a great answer above, I thought I'd add a couple of things. The question of the proximity of a text to the original depends on a number of factors, age being an important one, but certainly not the only one. To think about this, it is necessary to think about the process of manuscript manufacture in the early years of the church. ...


4

Although the gospel accounts generally evidence the fact that Jesus was fully literate, including this account in John: 6This they said to test him, that they might have some charge to bring against him. Jesus bent down and wrote with his finger on the ground. 7And as they continued to ask him, he stood up and said to them, “Let him who is without sin ...


4

The preface on their site includes the list of translators and editors down toward the bottom: Pentateuch: Richard E. Averbeck, Ph.D. (Dropsie College) Robert B. Chisholm, Th.D. (Dallas Theological Seminary) Dorian Coover-Cox, Ph.D. (Dallas Theological Seminary) Eugene H. Merrill, Ph.D. (Columbia University) Allen P. Ross, Ph.D. (Cambridge University) ...


4

No translation can be all things to all readers, so this version ought to be supplemented with other translations. As you note, the Dead Sea Scrolls were not widely available in 1966 and there has been other advances in scholarship since publication. For that reason, it makes sense to consult more recent translations, such as the English Standard Version, ...


2

For a detailed discussion of this, I recommend A History of New Testament Lexicography by John A. L. Lee. It specifically explores how translators have relied heavily on lexicons, which in turn rely heavily on earlier translations and other lexicons.


2

I'm not sure why you contrast Hebrew and Jewish versification; they are one and the same. In Hebrew/Jewish Bibles, Genesis 31:54 is "ויזבח יעקב זבח בהר ויקרא לאחיו לאכל לחם ויאכלו לחם וילינו בהר". In the translation of the NRSV, this is rendered: "and Jacob offered a sacrifice on the height and called his kinsfolk to eat bread; and they ate bread and tarried ...


1

Winter refers to what climate According to ISBE, Winter is the "rainy season." The rainy season ushers in a marked change in temperature from highs during the summer ranging from 85°F to triple digits. The "winter" months have both hard frosts and snow each year. Apparently the biblical writers were not focused as much on "seasons" as they were on ...



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