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Short Answer: Paul was not in any way endorsing their action. On the contrary, Paul was bringing this up as evidence of their absurdity. The Corinthians were denying that the dead would be raised... but then they were turning around and getting baptized for them! His point is that they are being ridiculous. Context: The flow of the passage First, Paul ...


6

Yes, Baptism is well attested in Jewish sources dating from both before and after Christ. These are both for mainstream Judaism and sectarian. From before Jesus, one finds clear references to baptism in the Dead Sea Scrolls. See for example, 1QS (The Community Rule) and 4Q274-276 (The Purity Texts). From sources dating after Jesus (but portraying ...


5

Context is king and the context suggests judgement: As the people were in expectation, and all were questioning in their hearts concerning John, whether he might be the Christ, John answered them all, saying, “I baptize you with water, but he who is mightier than I is coming, the strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie. He will baptize you with ...


5

I believe Paul used the phrase "Baptism for the dead" vs 29, in the context of a spiritual war. I think it means those who "stand in the gap" for (or in the place of) fallen Christian brothers and sisters. I know that sounds a bit odd so let me explain. The Apostle Paul frequently used military terms to describe the Christian's ongoing spiritual battles ...


4

I have found it quite difficult to find any commentaries, ancient or modern, that state that the "us" is not Jesus and John the Baptist. Your question however has challenged me to look outside my orthodoxy, and so I present two interpretations: 1. Jesus was referring to himself and John the Baptist First, Jesus himself had to be baptised, and he was aware ...


4

There have been various theories throughout the years as to what this refers. Martin Luther believed it was an ordinary baptism of a living person, but that it occurred over the tomb of the dead. John Calvin saw this as a normal baptism of someone when they were close to death. Another interpretation is that this is a metaphor and someone being baptized ...


3

Notice the context of this phrase in Matthew 3: But when he saw many of the Pharisees and Sadducees come to his baptism, he said unto them, O generation of vipers, who hath warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bring forth therefore fruits meet for repentance: And think not to say within yourselves, We have Abraham to our father: for I say unto ...


3

To understand these passages, it is necessary to understand the way covenant functions in relation to individuals and groups in the Scripture. The Biblical mindset does not seem to be troubled by the same stark one/many dichotomy that plagues Western philosophy. Read through the Scriptures and you will find many instances that are unsettling to our Western ...


2

Short Answer: Jesus was going to baptize people with the Holy Spirit. This cleansing, purifying, regenerating work of the Holy Spirit in a person's life is referred to in a number of ways throughout Scripture, including baptism with the Holy Spirit and fire. Long Answer What Jesus came to do: Jesus' mission was to go to the cross, die, rise from the dead, ...


1

The Essenes were a religious sect of Judaism, first appearing after the Hasmonean revolt, up through and during the time of Christ. You can find more about them here. Thus, for the Essenes, the physical act of immersion was insufficient in itself to render the individual fit for participation in community functions. The immersion had to be preceded ...


1

NOT WATER BAPTISM THAT SAVES YOU: It becomes immediately apparent, when reading this verse, that the ritual of water baptism, though symbolising a spiritual change that has taken place, is not the principal subject here. Peter informs us that he is NOT referring to "the physical removal of dirt from the flesh" (i.e. water baptism) but a spiritual reality of ...


1

That verse is in the context of a larger argument on resurrection. It's largely in response to the question posed in verse 12: "Now if Christ is proclaimed as raised from the dead, how can some of you say that there is no resurrection of the dead?" Paul goes on to prove resurrection. In v29, Paul is NOT arguing for the practice of the baptism of the dead. ...


1

The Bible has a long history of using plurality and singularity interchangeably. You have already keyed in on one verse, but another is Deuteronomy 6:4. "Sh'ma Yisrael, Yahweh Eloheinu, Yahweh Echad" or translated - "Hear, O Israel, the LORD is our God, the LORD is One! ". In Elohenu and it's root Elohim are plural in form. As such, most modern Christian ...



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