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The New Bible Dictionary states: For centuries both Judaism and Christianity accepted without question the biblical tradition that Moses wrote the Pentateuch. Ben-Sira (Ecclus. 24:23), Philo (Life of Moses 3. 39), Josephus (Ant. 4.326), the Mishnah (Pirqê Abôth 1. 1), and the Talmud (Baba Bathra 14b) are unanimous in their acceptance of the ...


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A book which is not finished at the time a writer dies does not alter his status as the author of the rest of the work. Some extra-Biblical examples: “Bill Budd” was written by Herman Melville; “A Moveable Feast” by Ernst Hemingway; “A Death in the Family” by James Agee. These were finished by someone other than the author; yet all are considered as written ...


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Although my initial reaction to this question was (not unlike the response in another answer here) that obviously this day-of-the-week superscription (DWS) reflects the Jewish liturgical background of the translator, this conclusion depends on several assumptions: The phrase "τῆς μιᾶς σαββάτων" is original to the Old Greek translation of the Psalms ("LXX")...


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The question: What does the inclusion of τῆς μιᾶς σαββάτων in the LXX of Psa. 24:1 demonstrate about the religious identity of the translator(s) of Psa. 24:1 into the LXX? Forgive me if I'm oversimplifying, but doesn't the inclusion (or addition) of a phrase from the Hebrew Talmud logically suggest a Jewish religious identity? I don't see how it could ...


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All the books of the Pentateuch have traditionally been attributed to Moses, who is the leading character in four of them, excluding Genesis. It is thought that only Moses could have known the events in those four books, and also that God must have told him what to write in the Book of Genesis. Then, as early as 1520, the German theologian Andreas Rudolf ...


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Eusebius, writing in the fourth century, referred to Papias as having written about Matthew as an author of what may be the Gospel that now bears the name of Matthew: Church History 3:39:16: But concerning Matthew he writes as follows: “So then Matthew wrote the oracles in the Hebrew language, and every one interpreted them as he was able. Assuming ...


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I believe the scholarly view is still mainstream among critical scholars - see Wikipedia. However, some scholars could potentially be led by to this conclusion by any preconceptions they have, including that multiple authorship solves the problem of Isaiah being able to predict the future, just as a reverse of this is a potential preconception among ...



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