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While reading links to add to this question, I ran across Gesenius’ explanation (§129 c.), which seems to be too much of an answer to incorporate into the question. I therefore offer it as an answer, although I have a sense that it’s up for disputing, and I’d love to see other answers incorporating more recent scholarship. Gesenius labels this lamed ...


3

James 1:1 In James 1:1 we read: James, a bondservant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, To the twelve tribes which are scattered abroad: Greetings. (Jam 1:1 NKJ) This introductory greeting informs the readers that the writer is called 'James' and he considers himself to be a slave of both God and the Lord Jesus Christ. In itself, this greeting ...


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This is only a partial answer against the idea that the author inserted the 'we' references to give a false sense of closeness to the action. There are five passages which are written in the first person: 16:10-17, 20:5-15, 21:1-18, 27:1-29, 28:1-16. Of these, 16:10-12, 20:5-6, 20:13-16, 21:1-8, 21:15-16, 27:1-29, 28:11-16 are travel narratives, not ...


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The answer is no, because there is no real evidence that King David wrote any of the psalms attributed to him. James Luther Mays says in Psalms, page 9, that the personal identities of the authors of the Psalms are unknown. He says the quest for the origin of individual psalms leads to occasions in Israel's public exercise of religion, not to their authors. ...



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